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Full text of "Quincy Sun Jan - June 1990"

Inaugural Photos, Other 



■i:.'} 






4, 15 





vol.. 22 No. 15 



Thursday, January 4, 1990 



THOMAS CRAf4£ PUBUC LIBRARY 
40 WASHINGTON ST. 



UU I WC t , MA 0g1t S 9 




A New Mayor, A New Era 




MAYOR JAMES ANDREW SHEETS, left, takes the oath of office from City Clerk John 
Gillis during Tuesday's inauguv^ion ceremony inside the Quincy Vocational-Technical School 
Gymnasium. 

(Quincy- Sun photo by C.harlet Flaffg) 

New City Council President 

DeCristofaro Pledges 
To Work With Sheets 



Ward 2 Councillor Ted 
DcCristolaro was sworn-in as 
the new City Council 
president, pledging to work 
closely with the James Sheets 
administration to preserve 
and improve the quality of life 
in Quincy. 

DeCristolaro. who was 
unanimously elected Council 
President, also said he will 
continue to address what he 
referred to as "detrimental" 
issues to the entire city: the 
Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority and 
Clean Harbors. Inc. 

"With regard to the 
MWRA and Clean Harbors, 
these arc two situations that 
are detrimental not only to 
Ward Z but to the entire city 
of Quincy and the South 
Shore. 

"Be assured that I will 
continue to do all that I can to 
protect the health and well- 
being ol all ol our cit/ens." he 
said. 

DeCristofaro. who succeeds 
Councillor Patricia loland as 
president, called his election 
"a distinct honor and 
privilege." He also thanked 
his fellow councillors for their 
vote of confidence, adding. "It 
will be both challenging and 
rewarding to work with 
Ihcm." 

Ilic new president noted 
that the council begins its new 
session with two members: 
Ward I Councillor Peter 
Kolson and Ward 4 
Councillor lorn Kabri/io. 

"I am pleased in welcome 
them and hope they will 
enjoy ihcir years on the 




WARD 2 COUNCILLOR Ted DeCrbtofaro delivers his 
acceptance speech after iMing elected the new City Council 
president. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Horman) 



council as much as I have." 
said IXrCristofaro. who was 
first elected to the council in 
l9Kt and is beginning his Hfih 
two-year term. 
"I am grateful to the people 



of Ward 2 for re-electing me 
to represent them and I will 

continue to address their 
concerns to the very best of 
my abUity." 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

James Andrew Sheets began his term as Quincy's 3 1st mayor Tuesday 
pledging his administration will search for solutions to the present economic 
problems the city faces while improving the quality of life here. 



After taking the oath of 
office from City Clerk John 
Gillis, Sheets, in a 20-minute 
inaugural address acknow- 
ledged tough times are ahead 
mostly because of financial 
restraints but added through 
hard work and unity, Quincy 
will successfully meet the 
challenges ahead. 

Inaugural Address 
Text On Page 5 

"We will search for 
solutions to our economic 
problems. We will grapple 
creatively with those quality 
of life issues. 

"As the old mariner would 
say. whether we succeed or 
fail will depend, not on the 
force of the gale, but the set of 
the sail. Not on the intensity 
of our problems but on our 
response to them. 

"We will succeed because 
we have learned the secret of 
leadership - that the hopes 
lor our future rests not on the 
grandness of our plans but the 
character of our people ... Wc 
will succeed because we know 
that trust is more important 
than the exercise of power, 
that leadership must be 
conscientous and accountable, 
because we will listen before 
we act. 

"We will succeed because 
we will drink at the well- 
spring of public lite - caring 
about others. I.ei us begin 
together right now." the new 
mayor told spectators inside 
the Quincy Vocational- 
lechnical (jymnasium. 

Sheets, who succeeds lt)ur- 
term Mayor Francis X. 
McCauley.. who was not a 
candidate for re-election, 
announced several courses of 
action to deal with a projected 
$I.V5 million deficit in fiscal 
1991 and to impro\e the 
quality of life here. 

Regarding finances. Sheets 
said he will: 

• Suggest sources of new 
revenue but was unspecific as 
to what these sources will be. 
He also hinted that new 
revenue sources might not be 
enough and therefore budget 
cuts may be necessary. 

• Issue an executive order 
freezing the filling of all 
vacant positions as an 
additional cost sa\ing 



Sheets' Major Points 

• Will Suggest New 
Revenue Sources 

• Will Freeze Filling Vacancies 

• Will Make Recommendations 
Regarding HospitaPs Future 

• May Use Landfill 
For Recreation 

• Rezone The City 

• Create Planning Review Board 

• Go To Court To Block MWRA 
Sludge Facility 

• Initiate "Adopt- A- Park" 
Program 

• Continue Fight Against 
Clean Harbors 

• Continue Downtown 

Revitalization 

• Expand Downtown Retail 

• Seek Federal Funds For 
Cultural Center 



measure. 

Sheets, who said cutting the 
budget by $l.l5million would 
have a "catastrophic impact" 
on all departments and 
services, said he will not 
recommend a Prop. 2'/: 
override. 

In addition, he said his 
administration will "isolate" 
Quincy flospital and the West 
Quincy landfill which he 
called 'Two additional sources 
of fiscal difficulty." Last year, 
the hospital had a $.12 million 
deficit while the city has been 
court-ordered to pay $4 
million to cap the landfill this 
year. 

"We cannot, and will not. 
allow further deficits." 

As such. Sheets said he will 



place his recommendations 
regarding the hospital's future 
before the City Council within 
the next three months. He 
also noted that his admini- 
stration is "looking seriously" 
at using the landfill for passive 
recreation. 

Confident that budget 
problems will be resolved. 
Sheets pledged to address 
Quincy's quality of life issues 
such as proper zoning, proper 
police and fire protection and 
health concerns. 

In this area. Sheets said he 
will: 

• Instruct Planning 

Director Richard Meade to 

"identify the process through 

which we must go in order to 

(Cont'd on Page 14) 



Sun Suspends 
Video News Report 



The Quincy Sun this week 
is suspending its Ch. 26 Video 
News Report until further 
notice. 

The final telecast was the 
coverage of Mayor James A. 
Sheets inaugural address and 
City Council and .School 



Co mum tec ceremonies 
Tuesday. 

Sun Publisher Henry 
Bos worth said that the Video 
News Report will be 
evaluated during the 
suspension. 

Meanwhile, the regular 24- 



nour news text will continue 
while that phase is also 
evaluated. 

Bosworth said he regretted 
the shon notice about the 
suspension but that due to 
various circumstances he felt 
it should be made without 
further delay. 



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Firefighters Ratify New Contract 



The Firefighters Union has 
voted to ratify a new pay 
contract. 

The Firefighters Union has 
been without a contract for 
more than two years. 

The new contract, voted by 
a wide margin of 155-16, calls 
for retroactive pay increases 
as follows: 

■ Three percent increase on 
July, 1987, a two percent 
increase on July of 1988, a six 
percent increase on January. 



1989, and another six percent 
increase effective Jan. 1, 1990. 

The new contract will 
expire June 30 of this year. 

The contract also includes 
additional payments for 
longevity, clothing allow- 
ances, holiday benefits, and 
educational credits. 

Mayor Elect James Sheets 
said he is happy with the new 
contract. 

"I am pleased that the 
firefighters have ratified the 



contract," he said, "and 
certainly, one of my first 
duties as Mayor will be to 
bring the appropriate order 
before the City Council that 
will enable the firefighters to 
be paid the money that's due 
them, it's been a long and 
difficult time for them and 1 
am very happy that going into 
my administration that that 
issue has fundamentally been 
resolved. I'm sure they're very 
happy." 



Former Mayor Francis 
McCauley said Tuesday 
morning that "the bulk of the 
money" for the Firefighters 
Union has been set aside in a 
special reserve fund over the 
years. 

"There is well over a million 
dollars in that account," 
McCauley said, "and that 
should take care of most of 
it. . .so it won't have an 
adverse financial effect on the 
city at this time." 



McCauley To Receive National 
Financial Leadership Award 



For helping the city regain 
its financial footing. Mayor 
Francis McCauley will be 
honored as this year's winner 
of the Mayor's Financial 
Leadership Award, a nation- 
wide program that recognizes 
sound and innovative fiscal 
management of municipal 
governments. 

He will receive the award 
during the winter meeting of 
the U.S. Conference of 
Mayors in January, which, 
along with New York-based 
AMBAC Indemnity Corp., 
sponsors the annual 
competition, currently in its 
fourth year. 

Quincy received the highest 
honor among America's 
smaller cities, those with 
populations under 150,000. 



McCauley was recognized 
for his emphasis on Quincy's 
investment portfolio and his 
desire to cooperate with the 
private sector during a 
downturn in the city's 
financial history. 

Conceived in 1986. the 
Mayor's Financial Leader- 
ship Award honors mayors 
who have set financial 
management as a priority in 
their administration— as 
evidenced by the introduction 
and management of sound 
fiscal practices, as well as a 
mayoral commitment to 
strengthening fiscal integrity 
within municipal govern- 
ments. 

With city finances 
floundering when he took 
office in 1982, McCauley 



embarked on a plan to restore 
Quincy's financial status. 
Under his leadership, utilizing 
new revenue sources became 
intrinsic to Quincy's financial 
recovery. 

For example, Quincy 
collected more than $5 million 
in delinquent property taxes 
and oversaw the sales of 
unused city assets. 

McCauley also established 
a capital outlay program to 
eliminate a backlog of 
equipment and building 
repair needs in city 
departments. He also 
introduced a sewer user fee 
plan which qualified Quincy 
for state and federal funds for 
new and existing sewer 
projects. 

In addition, the mayor 



established a data processing 
department to computerize 
financial records and 
restructured the budget and 
revenue procedures to 
provide more accurate 
forecasting and better 
control. Several departments 
were also reorganized and 
consolidated. 

During the past eight fiscal 
years, the city budget and 
non-property tax revenue 
accounts were in surplus 
amounting to more than $20 
million. During this time, the 
free-cash deficit was 
eliminated and a surplus ($8.2 
million now) was realized. 

McCauley said the award 
also recognizes the work and 
effort by the City Council and 
city depatments. 



Ward 3 Democrats To Caucus Feb. 3 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 3 will hold a caucus 
Saturday. Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. to 
elect delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 3 will elect 12 
delegates and four alternates 
equally divided between men 
and women to send to the 
convention. I"hc apportioned 
number of delegates has been 
allocated on the basis of a 
formula giving equal weight 
to the Democratic Party 
registration and the average 
vote tor Democratic 
candidates in the last general 
elections for governor and 
president for which figures 
were available at the time 



delegate tabulations were 
prepared. 

Chairman John Lydon Jr. 
will call the caucus at Ciranite 
Place, 125 Granite st.. 
Quincy. Ihe caucus is open to 
all registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to register 
and media representatives. 
The only persons eligible to 
participate in any portion ot 
the caucus are those who are 
registered IX'mocrats in the 
ward or town as of Dec. 29, 
1989. There will be no 
absentee or proxy voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate must also be 
present, \otin}! and give his or 
her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomina- 



tion must be seconded by two 
persons at the local caucus. 

All ballots will be written 
and secret. Ihosc candidates 
receiving the greatest number 
of votes on the first ballot will 
be elected. 

lach candidate will be 
allowed to make a two-minute 
speech and to distribute on 
his her behalf one sheet of 
paper listing qualifications 
and ideas. 

Slate-making is allowed, 
but no special preferences 
shall be given to slates. There 
is no quorum requirement lor 
the caucus. 

There will be no admission 



or expense charge at the 
caucus, although donations 
may be solicited. 

Discrimination on the basis 
of race. sex. age. color, creed, 
national origin, religion, 
ethnic identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic status 
in the conduct ol the caucus is 
strictly prohibited. 



Challenges to the delegate 
selection process can be filed 
in writing wiih the Compliance 
Review Commission, c o ihe 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Party. 45 Bromlicid St.. 
Boston. M,A ():i()S no later 
than I eh. 5. 1990. 



r 



V. 



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• Would a Part-Time College program help you? 

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either days or evenings, in one of our many degree programs. 
With 28 Majors and Concentrations tochoise from you will be able 
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Counselors available to help you plan your course of study 

Classes begin January 22, 1990 

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Elected School Committee Vice-Chairman 

Schools Must Address Social 
Inadequacies Says Santoro 



niunday. January 4, IW« Qulncy Sun Page 3 

Herb Fontaine 
Retiring At WJDA 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Frank Santoro, unani- 
mously elected vice-president 
of the Quincy School 
Committee during Tuesday's 
inauguration ceremonies, said 
cooperation, respect and 
support from the entire 
community is needed to meet 
the educational challenges c 
the 1990s. 

In his acceptance speech, 
Santoro pointed out that 
public schools in the 1990s 
must address not only 
education but also social 
inadequacies. With Quincy 
facing a $13.5 million deficit, 
Santoro noted that the new 
decade brings great demands 
on teachers and the school 
system. 

"When looking at the 
children of the 90s, not only 
are we looking at students 
who need to learn what we 
had to but we are also looking 
at students who need to learn 
what many of today's families 
and society never taught 
them. Schools of the 90s must 
address not only education 
but also the social in- 
adequacies and they must do 
it with budgets that do not 
stay in step with the problems. 

"We would agree that the 
teacher is the primary source 
of our children's learning, yet 
since Proposition 2 and a half, 
this state has laid off over 
13,000 of them." 

Continuing, Santoro said, 
"In the year ahead, we will be 
faced with contract negotia- 
tions with no money to give. 
Our school facilities could use 
S14 million of repair. And 
PTO's are supplementing text 
and supply orders through 
fundraising. 

"Yes, the demands of the 
90s will be great on teachers 
and our school system. That is 
why we call upon the entire 
city for its assistance. Input 
from all aspects of the 
community is needed, wanted 



and valued. 

"Elected officials, business 
leaders, senior citizens and all 
citizens of Quincy need to join 
parents and teachers in this 
drive. Many events this past 
year have enhanced this goal: 
the march on City Hall made 
education a political issue; 
Supt. Dr. (Robert) Ricci's 
business linkage and 
vocational education 
strategies have enlighted 
business interaction; the 
continued support from the 
City Council and the City- 
Wide Parent Council are all 
included in the initiatives that 
must continue and be joined 
by every citizen of Quincy," he 
said. 

Santoro then called upon 
every citizen to ask: "How can 
I help bring education into the 
90s? What can I do to 
guarantee that every child 
feels wanted and learns 
something new everyday?" 

"Together, we must 
embrace and lead our leaders 
and our children into this new 
decade." 

Santoro also welcomed 
Mayor James Sheets, who 
will serve as chairman of the 
School Committee, and newly 
elected members, Mary 
"Jane" Powers and Ronald 
Mariano. 

"It is with you that I and the 
other committee members call 
upon for your help so that we 
may bring our school system 
into the 1990s," he said. 

Santoro, who accepted his 
new position with great pride, 
also acknowledged several 
outgoing members and 
thanked them for their 
support, years of service and 
devotion. 

"I am honored to have 
served with the late Chris 
Kennedy, Peg Nigro, Bob 
Jarnis and Frank McCauley. 
They should all be com- 
mended for the many hours 
they have given the children of 
Quincy." 



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OPEN 9:30 TO 5:30 THURS & FRI. TIL 9 




Veteran radio news 
announcer Herb Fontaine 
will retire as news editor- 
director at WJDA in Quincy 
Friday, March 30. 

Fontaine's radio career 
spans approximately 42 years. 
He was a program director 
and sports announcer at 
WCOU AM and FM in 
Lewiston, Maine, for seven 
and a half years before joining 
WJDA 35 years ago. He has 
been news editor-director 
throughout his career at 
WJDA. 

Fontaine explained that he 
has enjoyed his radio 
broadcasting career but feels 
it is time to step down from his 
full-time position. He noted 
that he may do some part- 
time radio work after his 




HERB FONTAINE 

retirement. 

While at WJDA, Fontaine 
has covered City Council 
meetings as well as six 
mayors: Amelio Delia Chiesa, 
James Mclntyre, Walter 
Hannon, Joseph LaRaia, 
Arthur Tobin and Francis 
McCauley. 



Keep Path To Mailbox 
Clear Of Ice And Snow 



FRANK SANTORO jives his acceptance speech after being 
unanimously elected vice chairman of the Quincy School 
Committee at Tuesday' Inauguration ceremonies. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charles Flagf() 



The U.S. Postal Service 
asks area residents to clear ice 
and snow from walkways and 
steps leading to their mailbox 
so that letter carriers will be 
able to deliver their mail in a 
safe and timely manner this 
winter. 

Letter carriers experience a 
high incidence of injuries 
resulting from slips, trips and 



falls when icy and snowy 
conditions prevail. Many of 
these accidents could be 
prevented if walkways and 
steps were shoveled, salted or 
sanded. 

A safe, clear pathway not 
only benefits your letter 
carrier, but also your family, 
friends and other visitors to 
your home. 




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Pubiish«d w«*kly on Thursday by 

Th« Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Ouincy. Mass 02168 

Hanry W Bosworth Jr . Pubiishar 
Roban H Boswonh. Editor 
Jana C Arana. Assistant Editor 

K* par copy, $11 00 par yaar by mail in OuiiKy 
11200 par yaar by mail outsida Ouincy. $15 00 out of stala 

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02169 



Readers Forum 

Praise For Cerasoli, 
Post Audit Committee 



Editor. The QuiiK> Sun. 

In recent years, under the 
chainnanship d' Rcpnsent3Q\e 
Robert A. Cerasoli ot"QuiiK>, 
the House Comttiittee on Post 
Audit and Oversight has 
provided valuable service to 
the Legislature and the pubUc. 
It is perhaps the single most 
public-orientated legislative 
committee whose goal is to 
promote more effective 
management of state 
government through per- 
formance evaluations 
conducted by the Committees 
audit investigative bureau. 

Requests for an House Post 
Audit review may come from 
a variety of sources; the 1 1- 
member Committee, the 
Bureau, other legislative 
committees, individual 
representatives or concerned 
citizens. Each year many new 
programs are imtiated dealing 
with the problems facing ttK 
Commonwealth. State 
expenditures, as we all are 
aware, have escalated 
dramatically. Consequently. 
Post .Audit's mission focuses 
on: ".Are the funds being spent 
on these programs producing 
tlie desired results' Are there 
better ways to attack and 
s*rfve tbe sute's probfcmsT* 

Chairman Cerasoli has 
been both diligent and 
courageous in maintaining his 
committee's firm stay on 
course. Through Post Audit 
reports, government and the 
public were advised as to the 
fraihies of the Massachusetts 
prison fiiriougfa system, the 
deterioration of the state's 
civil service system, 
exploitation r>*" •>•- 0? 



cv^csuitant sy«em. abuse oi 
special repair and confidential 
vehicle registration plates, 
inappropriate expenditures 
by the Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority and 
many others. It should be 
further noted that these 
reports are usually aa'ompa- 
nied by corrective legislation 
and data, or both, and ha%e 
resulted in millions of dollars 
saved on behalf of ta.xpayers 
and ratepayers. 

However, aggressive 
leadership in the political 
arena can of^en lead to ironic 
consequences. On the very 
evening that those House 
members. . .many of whom 
two years ago were unfamiliar 
with the 03 account. . .voted 
to curb excessive spending for 
consultants, they then 
attacked the messenger, 
cutting S 163.000 from Post 
Audit's S9'5.000 budget. 

We believe this precipita- 
tous action is unwise and 
sends out the wrong signal. 
The purpose, as we 
understand iL of the House 
Post .\udit and Oversight 
Comminee m evaluating state 
programs, is to provide the 
Legisiature with an anal>~sis of 
what happened. . .why it 
happened .. .and what 
alternatives are availaUe for 
future action. 

.Any contnbution toward 
better management proce- 
dures m our state government 
should be su^Mrted. not 
disparaged b> intemperate 
acts. 

John Catti, Jr. 
Legtslatrvc Chairperson 



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hx tha purposa of insunng fttfmture 
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airy, kjrsw siMnaara «>d guns, up to 

iooarapa ia also prowidsd igainiit 

hars tor acodsntai bodMy miury or ' 

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adMna on your inauranca naads talk 

nca at'lTI nnor visit us at 1«S 






Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Passing The Torch 




McCAlLEY 




The torch has been passed at City Hall. 

Francis .\. McCaulcy exited 

Tuesday after four terms as Quincy's 

chief executive. James A. Sheets 

entered and for how long a stay only 

time will tell. 

Ominous fiscal times are forecast 

for the next two years and maybe 

longer. Sheets is coming into office at 

one of the toughest periods any new 

mayor has had to face. 

How many terms await him no 

crystal ball can tell. But Quincy 

voters traditionally give a new mayor 

a second term as long a> he shows 

them he is (A) honest (B) he is trying. 

(C) and not only has intelligence but 

a dash of good old fashioned 

L-i*i-i--r - common sense to season it. 

SHLLTS 

Sheets should quality in alt those categones. 
Sometimes you can't help wonder why anyone would 
want to be mavor. 

The mayor's office down through the years has 
proven a political dead end. Only one of Quincy's 
mayors has gone on to a high office. Charles Francis 
Adams was Secretary of the Navy under President 
Herbert Hoover. And he had the Adams family name 
going for him. 

And from a popularity standpoint ii'> really all 
downhill. 

n a mayor was elected unanimously, he would start 
losing ground the second day m office The first time he 
said ""no" to someone looking for a favor. 

And. by the time he runs for re-election, he can count 
on at least lO.CKX) negative votes out there. Even George 
Washington would probablv have 10.000 votes against 
him as a Quincy mayor running for re-ekction. 

Frank McCauley came into office with a high reading 
on the applause meter. Cioing out. the needle has slipped 
somewhat. 

In those eight years in the olTice where the buck stops 
penixi. McCauley like mayors before him. developed 
his share of critics. And. like mayors before him. gave, 
from time to time, cause — imagined or real — to 
critici/e. 

There are those, for example, who say he should have 
played hardball with General Dynamics over that S\9 
million tax settlement. They forget the court ordered 
him to settle up. 

And there are those who say he should have taken the 
shipyard by emir^nt domain v">r in a joint venture with 
the private sector and developed it into a tax revenue 
bonan/2. 

This, they argue, would also have prevented the 
.MWRA from grabbing off the shipyard and 
carmarkmg it for the sludge facility. 




LKVY 



But that's hindsight. No one 
dreamed that Paul Levy would one 
day sneak into town and snatch the 
yard and the hell with Quincy. 

Some think McCauley should 
have tied Levy and Co. up in a 
straightjacket of legal knots they 
could never wiggle out of 

But. unfortunately, with the court ordering the 
cleanup of Boston Harbor, in what could have been a 
long and expensive run. that may not have worked. 
Whatever the MWRA wants, the MWRA will get. If 
not today, tomorrow . But Sheets says he w ill go to court 
and give it a try. 

The tax settlement — a matter he inherited - the 
shipyard sale and the sludge facility were three of 
McCauley's major frustrations in office. 

But. if he is remembered for them, he should also be 
remembered for his accomplishments. 

The city's financial picture and credit ratings 
improved under him. 

Although he has an image of a tight-wad who pinches 
pennies until .Abe Lincoln turns blue, he established a 
good capital outlay program and spent S2I million for: 
school commputers. eight pieces of new Fire 
Department equipment, communications equipment 
for both the Police and Fire departments, replacement 
of half of the police patrol car fleet each year, new 
snowplows. upgrading public works and forestry 
department equipment. 

And besides that: Si< million on school refurbishing, 
plus a new police station, new hospital and a new animal 
shelter. 

McCauley didn't mind spending money as long as the 
city could afford it and as long as it was for something 
really needed. 

He is one of the few ~ if not the only mayor ~ who 
caught tlak because he came up with a SIO million 
surplus two years ago. Special interests tried to get him 
to part with it. But he held on to it as though it was his 
life's sa\ings. 

That money, he insisted, was for a rainy dav. Well, in 
case you have been on a slow boat to China and haven"! 
seen the papers, it's fiscally raining like hell ir 
Massachusetts and Quincy is in for some oi the storm 

And. those SIO million bucks will help Quincy 
balance this year's fiscal budget through the end ot 
June. The money will look good to Sheets. 

McCauley was a banker and tried to run the city in a 
strict business-like manner. 

To many he was cold and beyond warming up in the 
personality department. 

But he could be warm and he could let his hair down 
among people he knew. His NHh birthday tarewell to 
close friends and associates last week was an example 
when he came up with his own obituary An hilarious 
spoof of his death at age 9.S in the year 202-*> while 
discomg. 

Frank McCauley was an honest mayor His 
administration was clean. He did what he thought was 
right though at times you may lun have agreed with 
him. And he leaves the city in pretty good shape. 

Historx. we think, will treat him well 



Teen Strength Training Research Program 



Beginnmg the week of Jan 
15th, Dr Wayne Westcott, 

Fitness I>rector and National 
YMC.A Strength Consultant. 



will be offenng a Teen 
Strength Training Research 
Program at the South Shore 





Quincy 
Pound 



Adoptables 



Husky, male, red white. 2 years, nice looking. 

ShelTr--t>pf male. I year, tan with black tip on 
nose and ear. long wavy coat. 

Shepherd-cross, female. 5 months, black tan. very 
frietHily . 

Shepherd-cross, female, black tan. 5 months 

Terner male, black. 2 years, tight curly coat. 

Lhasa Apso male. 2 years, tan white. 



Offices rn^i 

773-4297. Ml. 

Eictpt 



DiScfls. 



SJ«aM-4iMpa 



YMCA 

Tbe study will consist of 
teenage responses to sensible 
strength exercise using new 
weight training equipment 
which is known for its safels, 
effectiveness, and e.vereisc 
options. The prv>gram is open 
to males and females. 



Program time will consist 
of .MVM) minutes of strength 
training, three days a week 
between ,^ and 6 p.m. for 10 
weeks 

Participants will be 
eaicfull> tested. Call 4'>}- 
SM)0, extension 1.^: to 
icgister. 



Drug Addiction 



Take the "d" out of Oopc 
And replace it with « "h," 
Kilhng the drug-force with 
Spints of hope, kindliiin a 

positive note 
Of re\ivsd...« powei \\\ 

great .. 

Transforming the Addietoi 

to a born-again 

Chhstuin, through {\w lo\c 

and mercy of 
Our Savior, for now ht> 

"copes in • free-drui" 



I Miolenix, iuUiUing his true 
puipase vu life; 

lo serve CkhI with golden 
dcvHiik \k| action 

I OI luitnkind rewarding 
thf "usei" with a 

Puiilicalion oi biHly. mind 
mihI »ouI 

And « h««ii glowing wiht 
|o\, |H»jiee, 

And *H»nleutnient 

Anna lorn* Anderson 
iWt Simihern Artery 



niursday, Janiuiry 4, I WO Quincy Sun Page 5 



Text Of Mayor Sheets' Address Quincy's 



Following in ihv com/tlele 
text of Mayor Jami's A. 
Shoels InauKural /iddrexs. 

The hopes and dreams, the 
objectives and goals of my 
administration can be 
summed up in the words of 
Sheldon Bennett, Pastor of 
The United First Baptist 
Church, the Church of ' 
Presidents, when he said of 
Quincy: "We want a city of 
greatness, not only in 
prosperity, but especially in 
spirit .. a city in which the 
spirit of brotherhood and 
sisterhood is strong ... a city 
that is not a city of hostility 
but of hospitality ... a city that 
forever remains a city of peace 
and light." 

While these are goals of the 
spirit, they must form the 
foundation for all our 
endeavors. We cannot plan 
together unless we share our 
dreams together; we cannot 
build together unless wc are 
willing to work together. We 
cannot be unified unless we 
trust one another; wc cannot 
be successful unless wc realize 
that we must share our success 
together. We cannot succeed 
unless we put our faith in the 
creator of all men and believe 
we are a nation and a people 
of destiny. That we are mortal 
keepers of a sacred public 
trust. 

The pathway to the future 
for oi-r city will not be easy, 
for we live in both the best of 
times and the worst of times. 
In the best of times because we 
are heir to eight years of 
sound economic planning, 
management and growth. Ihc 
worst of times because wc are 
heir to the state's economic 
blundering and confusion and 
to a philosophical malaise in 
which the most fundamental 
values of our people, namely 
the right to a sound public 
education and the right to be 
safe and secure in their person 
and property arc in jeopardy. 

In this year's city budget 
alone, we face a 10 million 
dollar revenue shortfall. I'his 
deficit is the result of a state 
cut in local aid of 3.2 million 
dollars; it is the result of the 
failure to provide an a\ crage 2 
million dollar increase in local 
aid. It is the result of an 
unexpected and unplanned 2 
million dollar increase in 
employee health insurance 
costs. It is also the result of 
spiraling MWR A assessments 
as well as increases in \\orker's 
compensation costs. All of 
these costs are fi.xed and 
beyond this city's control. 

lorlunately. because of 
frugal management in the 
McCauley administration, we 
are hopeful that our surplus of 
free cash will cover this 
shortfall, and that we will end 
this fiscal year on .lune 3(hh 
with a balanced budget. 

However, the outlook for 
the 1990-1991 budget, which 
takes effect on July I of this 
year, is grim. By all 
projections, we face a budget 



deficit of $I3.5()0.0(M). There 
will be no surplus to help us. 
and this projected deficit does 
not include any newly 
negotiated employee raises. A 
straight reduction of the 1990- 
1991 budget by $13,500,000 
would have a catastrophic 
impact on all city departments 
and services but especially on 
education, fire and police. 

Very soon. I will present to 
the City Council my 
recommendations for meeting 
this fiscal crisis. Those 
recommendations will not 
include a suggestion to 
override Proposition 2'/:. 
They will include suggested 
sources for new revenue. Wc 
must realize that even these 
new revenue streams may not 
be enough to cover the deficit 
and that budget cuts may be 
necessary. 

I will also immediately issue 
an executive order freezing 
the filling of all vacant 
positions as an additional cost 
saving measure. 

In light of the fiscal 
shortfall, we have already 
been working hard over the 
past six weeks to isolate two 
additional sources of fiscal 
difficuhy. Quincy Hospital 
and the court-ordered 
capping of the city landfill 
which will cost $4,000,000. 
Under no circumstances can 
we allow Quincy Hospital or 
the lankfill to negatively 
impact our 1990-1991 budget. 
The hospital deficit for last 
year was $3,200,000 The 
projected deficit for this year 
is $2,000,000. We cannot, and 
we will not, allow further 
deficits. Within the next three 
* months, I will be placing my 
recommendations concerning 
the future of Quincy Hospital 
before the City Council. As 
for the landfill, we are looking 
seriously at the use of the site 
for passive recreation. We 
would keep it open space, but 
use the funding for 
constructing the recreational 
facility to finish the 4 million 
dollar capping of the landfill. 

If we are to meet these 
economic challenges, we must 
meet them together. The next 
two years are going to be 
extremely difficult. Our 
ability to work together, our 
creative talents, our 
willingness to sacrifice, all will 
be tested constantly. We must 
not allow a budget crisis to 
become a crisis of the spirit; 
we must not allow a revenue 

crisis to become a crisis of 
resolve. We must not lose our 
confidence in each other nor 
our willingness to work 
together for a greater 
common good. 

While these fiscal problems 
are painful and real, we will 
successfully resolve them and 
they will pass into history. 
ITieii character is fieeting and 
temporal. The truly lasting 
issues are the quality of life 
issues. Ihcy are not temporal 
and Hcetinu but last for 
generations effecting our 



children and our childrens' 
children. These legacies of 
importance, include sound 
education, clean air, clean 
water, neighborhoods whose 
quality of life is adequately 
protected by proper zoning 
and proper police and fire 
protection. These legacies 
build cities and nations that 
form character and ensure the 
future of all our tomorrows. 

It is to these ends that my 
administration is dedicated. 
We intend to take the 
following actions: First, it is 
important that our neighbor- 
hoods be protected from 
overdevelopment and poor 
development, (iood, well- 
planned and properly located 
development is integral to a 
healthy, growing city. Bad 
development destroys 
neighborhoods, adds to 
traffic woes and encourages 
further bad development. To 
protect the integrity of our 
neighborhoods. I am 
instructing our planning 
director. Richard Meade, to 
identify the process through 
which we must go in order to 
rezone the city and then 
activate that process. Further. 
I will, be executive order, 
create a planning review 
board, which will meet bi- 
weekly to evaluate all 
proposed new development 
and determine its impact on 
city services including water, 
sewer, schools, drainage and 
traffic control. That board 
shall consist of the Planning 
Director, Building Inspector, 
Commissioner of Public 
Works. Commissioner of 
Public Health, Traffic 
Engineer, Mayor and 
President of the City Council 
or his designee. 

Second, we have already 
begun to plan our "Adopt-A- 
Park Program." It is my 
intention to create an 
annualized, private-sector- 
generated fund to help 
maintain, repair and expand 
our park system. Ihis will 
require special legislation in 
order to roll over unexpended 
funds from year to year for the 
same park use. The "Adopt- 
A-Park Program" will 
supplement the McCauley 
"Adopt-An-lsland" program 
and both will become part of 
our overall beautification 
program for the city. That 
program is being crafted and 
will be implemented by my 
Executive Secretary. Tom 
Koch. 

Third, in order to ensure 
environmental safety, we are 
going to continue our fight 
against clean harbors. Bernice 
Mader will head Quincy's 
Environmental Task Force 
which is our major planning 
mechanism in the fight 
against Clean Harbors. I 
would like to publicly 
commend David Smith for 
the outstanding job he has 
done as chairman of the task 
force. Without his prior 
contributions, the road ahead 



would be much more difficult. 
Fourth, the battle against 
the MWRA will continue. 
The city of Quincy will file a 
lawsuit against the MWRA 
before the February 12th 
deadline. We intend to 
vigorously pursue the 
MWRA in court with the 
objective of preventing them 
from using the permanent 
sludge treatment facility at 
General Dynamics. Such 
facilities should never be 
constructed in dense, urban 
areas such as Quincy Point. 
They create odors, result in 
lower property values and. in 
general, discourage meaning- 
ful growth and change. The 
city of Quincy is not going to 
be pushed around by the 
MWRA or any other state 
agent. We will control our 
destiny. 

Fifth, much positive and 
meaningful change has 
occurred in downtown 
Quincy in the last eight years. 
Completion of Hancock 
Plaza and the near com- 
pletion of Presidents Place 
bode well for its future. 
However, much remains to be 
done. A successful downtown 
area is the heartbeat of any 
vibrant city. I intend to move 
forward with plans for the 
further revitalization of the 
downtown area, including the 
construction of a new cultural 
center and the expansion of 
existing retail capabilities. 
Our planning will be 
comprehensive and move 
forward with the support of 
our people and neighbor- 
hoods. Given the present 
economic climate we will 
begin this process by 
identifying federal funding 
sources and apply immediately 
for a planning grant. That 
money is available and we 
plan to get it. 

Sixth. Quincv must 
continue to be a leader in the 
field of public education. We 
should be proud of our 
accomplishments and the fact 
that we have a good public 
school system. Yet. the 
educational challenges of the 
decade of the 9()'s are 
enormous. World progress 
and change will and must be 
education-driven. Barriers 
among nations are crumbling. 
Bridges of economic 
cooperation and change are 
being built, lechnology is 
now the economic corner- 
stone of a new world 
economy, and we must be the 
vanguard of that change. 

We must crafi improved 
learning environments, create 
exciting curriculum changes, 
find different ways of 
challenging young minds, 
build better relationships 
between educational institu- 
tions and business, and 
strengthen parent teacher ties 
creating more meaningful 
links between school and 
home. We must find creative 
((.Hit I'd on I'afif '>) 



Yesterdays 




I >• 'I 






V 



For Your Comenience 

A New Locsition For: 

South Shore 

Evening Medical Care 

500 Congress Street 3-C 

Crown Colony Park • Quincy, MA 02169 

(617) 773-2600 

Reasonable Fees • QualiGed Physicians 
• Insurance Accepted • Adolescent and Adult Medicine 

• Walk In Service • Courtesy Blood Pressure Friday Evenings 

• No Appointment Necessary • Cholesterol Screening 

HOURS: Monday thru Friday: 6 PM - 9 PM; Saturday: 9 AM - 4 PM 
South Shore Evening Medical Care was formerly located at 21 School Street, Quincy 



A Medical Association of Quincy Inc. Affiliate 



Flavin Council 

President On 

41st Ballot 



Jan. 4-10 

1929 

61 Years Ago 



John P. Flavin was elected president of the City 
Council by a 5-4 vote over Angelo P. Bizzozero on the 
41st ballot taken over three Council sessions. 

The first 40 ballots showed w^mmmmmtmmmmmmmt 
Bizzozero with four votes. 
William P. Hughes with three 
and Flavin with two before 
Hughes. Clifton H. Baker and 

Carl H. Leander switched to ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Flavin on the 41st. m^mmm^m^^am^^ 

The Council then named Martin A. King as city 
auditor, ignoring Miss Elizabeth N. Dunn who had 
been appointed by Mayor Thomas J. McGrath to 
succeed the late Henry O. Fairbanks a few months ago. 

The delayed election of Flavin and the appointment 
of King overshadowed the inauguration of McGrath for 
a second two-year term as mayor on his 57th birthday. 
TRACK WALKING HAZARDOUS 

The Massachusetts Safety Council issued a warning 
of hazardous conditions on the New Haven Railroad's 
Old Colony tracks not far from the Quincy station. 

"This is the use of the railroad tracks by pedestrians 
beyond the railroad station in the direction of West 
Quincy," said the Council's warning. 

"On Friday of last week a train was forced to make an 
emergency stop because five children were discovered 
walking on the tracks in front of it. 

"These are the conditions that, if not corrected, 
inevitably lead to an accident." 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Sen. Henry L. Kincaide (R-Quincy)filed a bill in the 
State Legislature calling for a $50,000 appropriation to 
expedite the investigation of pollution in Quincy Bay ... 
Chairman Vrjo Matson of the Park Commission 
recommended five new tennis courts at Faxon Field 
since "tennis is becoming more popular, especially with 
the girls"... Mrs. F. Forrest Pease, chairman of the 
Friendly Cooperation with Disabled Ex-Servicemen 
Committee, reported on hospital visits to the Squantum 
Women's Club in the vestry of the First Church of 
Squantum ... Sirloin roast was 48 cents a pound and 
ham was 32 cents a pound at the Door Division of First 
National Stores on Beale St. near the Wollaston 
Railroad station... Drunken driving increased by 41 
percent in Quincy in 1 928, according to statistics relased 
percent in Quincy in 1928, according to statistics 
released by Police Lt. Edward Johnson ... Boy Scout 
Executive Kenneth B. Canfield left for New York to' 
attend a training course preparatory to taking up duties 
as scouts executive in Middlesex County. Conn ... Roy 
Y. O'Leary was installed as worshipful master of the 
Atlantic Masonic Lodge ... Neil A. MacDonald, 
chairman of the Ward 4 Republican Committee, was 
given a gold watch and $100 at the Republican State 
Committee meeting for obtaining the highest 
percentage increase in Republican registration for the 
past state election ... "The Singing Fool," starring Ol 
Joslon ("The World's Greatest Entertainer in his 
Talking Sensation in the Vitaphonc"), Betty Bronson 
and Josephine Dunn, was playing at the Strand ... A 
new 75-foot express yacht was being built for Roy L. 
Skofield of New York at the F.D. Lawley shipyard in 
Germantown ... Carleton Cook of Washington St., 
Quincy Point, was named manager of the new 
Wollaston Singer Sewing Machine Shop, 649 Hancock 
St ... A Willys Knight five-passenger sedan was selling 
for $790 at Merritt O. White, Inc., 615 Hancock St., 
Wollaston ... The Rev. Edwin Noah Hardy of New 
York, pastor of the church from 1 895 to 191 1, delivered 
the dedicatory sermon for the new Bethany 
Congregational Church ... Amos Loring, former police 
chief of Braintree, assumed his new duties as custodian 
of the Quincy court house ... Eight gallons of wine 
seized at the home of Alexandro Frigosi, 9 California 
Ave., South Quincy, was ordered returned by Judge 
Albert E. Avery, who ruled he possessed it legally ... 
Miss Florence Luscomb, executive secretary of the 
Massachusetts Commission for the Kellogg Pact, spoke 
before the Wollaston Christian Temperance Union ... 
School Committeeman Sturgis H. Hunt was displaying 
one of the world's smallest Bibles, 3/4 inches high, 5/8 
inch wide and less than 3 8 inch thick, printed in 
England in 1895 ... Quincy merchants were pushing for 
an 85-foot aerial fire ladder, noting that the city's new 
skyscraper, the Granite Trust Building, was nearing 
completion and the tallest ladder in the Fire 
Department was only 50 feet. 



ft Q mrn rt 



41m 




Maries 
Kitchen 



St. Joseph's School 
Lists Honor Students 



B\ MARIE J. DOUMPIO 



Scallops Au Gratin 

Ver\ Utile Fat 



ReccntU »i>en m\ brother John 
broufht me some great large scallops. I 
deoded to prepare indixidual serving 
dishes to each famiK member. In this 
CTitree. I used potatoes, so if you enjov 
p<Matoes. you uill rcall\ like this recipe. 
And there is very little fat. since Vw used 
^ira milk for the cream sauce. (^ ou may 
al&o skip the poutoes if >ou hke). 

SCALLOPS AL GRATIN 

1 Lbscalops 

(preferably haft, but any sizie wfll do) 

2 pot»K»es 

I Cap or so of seasoned breadcrumbs 

1 Ct^ ikreddei cheddar cheese (opdonJ) 

2 IVspi nttreerine 
2 Tb^K flow 

1 Ciq» or so of Mik 

1 Tbsp cooking sbory (optional) 

Snh & Pepper to taste 

First of all. boi! the poutoes with the 
skin on or put them in a microuavr. 
Prepare a simfJe cream sauce by melting 
the butter, adding the flour and the milk 



until smooth, (add the sherr> if using and 
salt and pepper). Cut the potatoes in bite 
size portions and add them to the cream 
sauce stirnng until well blended. 

Coat the scallops *ith the bread 
crumbs. In a slightly greased casserole 
dish. la>'er the scallops and then dredge 
them with the cream sauce now blended 
with the potatoes Sprinkle the top with 
the cheese and bake in a 350 degree oven 
for about 20 minutes or until cheese 
melts, (the time alwav-s depends on the 
size of the dish and the ivpe of oven). 1 
doubled this recipe the dav 1 cooked them 
and served 11 with a salad. 

Marie D'Ofimpio is the author of 
*^niply Ittlinn-.And Then Some." a 
coBection of ber on-n redpes. Copies (tf 
Ibe book are avaibMe at That's Italian, 
Franklin St.. South Quincy; Pre^ite's 
Market, Sumner St^ Qoincy Point , 
Samoset Pharmacy, Samosct Ave., 
Mcrrynount and Winfield Gift 
Ejnporium, Hancock St., Quincy Center. 



Forty three students at St. 
Joseph School arc on the 
honor roll for the first 
trimester. 

Grade 2: Brianna Ash, 
Pamela Garnett. Amy Papile, 
Peter Egcrsheim, Ian 
McCarthy and David 
Quinlan. 

Grade 3: Jonathan Brillo, 
Katie Connolly. Sarah 
Fimian, AnnMarie Gasrcia, 
Kristin Giannandrea, Maevc 
Glynn. Jamie Grossi, Stephen 
McArthur, Sarah McQuinn, 
Ashley Peterson, Ryan 
Piccinin. Katrina Skayne, 
and Andrew Sweeney. 

Grade 4: Alicia Bertrand, 
Richard Carbonncau, Bonnie 
Ford. Nicholas Hanratty. 
Caryn Kalell and Erin 
Madden. 

Grade 5: Jason Chagnon, 



O'Neil, l.isa Skayne and Scan 
Joyce. 

Grade 6: Megan madden, 
Jeffrey Baldock, Michael 
Carney and Carolyn 
Giermyski. 

Grade 7: Mandy Chan, 
Katherine Ford, Yasuyo 
Horiyama and Stephen 
Schneider. 

Grade S: Abigail Anastasi, 
Kara Bagen, Chrstit.e 
McDonnell, Amy Madden, 
Patrick Joyce, and Christine 
Curran. 

Thirty six students have 
achieved honorable mention 
for the first trimester, they 
are; 

Grade 2: Danielle De- 
angelo, Courtney Madden, 
Devin McCaughlin, Nicole 
McNamara, Joanne Ver- 
rochi, Jennifer White, Didier 
Althcr. Jame*^ Bennett and 



Christina McLaughlin. 

Grade 3: Lisa Caiifano, 
Stacey Edmonds, Soobhan 
Farrel, Sean Haidul and 
Kevin Regan. 

Grade 4: Kristin DiBona. 
Ronnie Nhu, Andrew 
Sheridan, Joseph Walsh and 
Paul Carney. 

Grade 5: Richard Garcia, 
Nicok Giannandrea. Chris- 
tine Pollara and Nancy 
Rusao. 

Grade 6: Matthew Baldock. 
Stephen Carlson. Daun 
Kalafatas. Justina Leskow 
and John Michael LoPnore 

Grade 7: Carolyn Bngug- 
lio. Tara Callow. Su^an 
Deskins. Tracey Grossi, 
Jeffrev McHugh and Saundra 
Wall. 

Grade S: Michelle Carlson 
and Nicole Kalafatas 



Spring Semester xNon-Credit 
Program Registration At QJC 



Yearbook Signing Reunion 
For QHS-Vo Tech 1989 Class 



A yearbook signing 
reunion for Quiacy High- 
Quincy Vo-Tech Class of 1989 
is scheduled for today. 
Thursday. Jan. 4. at 1 p.m. in 
the Quincy High School 



cafeteria. 

Graduates are to bring their 
copies of the 1989 Goldcnrod 
and a writing implement. 
Those who have not yet 
picked uf their Yearbook 



may do so at this time. Extra 
copies will also be on sale. 

Additional information 
mav be obtained bv calling 
47l'-32I9. 



Registration for the Spring 
Semester non-credit com- 
munity education program at 
Quincy Junior college began 
Tuesday and will continue 
until each course fills. Most 
courses surt the week of Jan. 
29 and continue for up to ten 
w«cks. 

An expanded program of 
140 course offerings will 
include: subjects in the 
following areas: business and 
cntrepreneurship. financial 



planning, management, 
computers, trade and 
vocational, learning and 
communication, home 
improvement, and real estate, 
languages, persona! health 
and growth, social issues, 
creative arts and leisure 
artivities and hobbies. 

A sampling of some of the 
new courses include; 
expanded computer training 
programs, taxpayer survival, 
mutual fund in\estments. 



AIDS education, fiction. 
gram and creati\e writing, 
homebuyer workshops, start 
your own bed and breakfast. 
parenting, atizen law. self 
esteem and guitar instruction 

Space IS limited m each 
course. All courses are located 
at sites in the Quincy area 

For more information, a 
course catalog, or registra- 
tion, call the Cont:nu;r,g 
Education Office at Q\::n:\ 
Junior College at 984-1655 



Maria Richards Attends 
State House Reception 



Sandra Levine Awarded 
81000 NEPA Scholarship 



Maria Richards of Quincy. 
a member of the Boston 
Center for International 
Visitors, recently attended a 
State House reception 
welcoming a delegatioD of 
miemational graduate and 
uudergradTiatc studer.ts 
pBrticmatinf in BCTV's Mid- 



W'inter Community Seminar, 
The reception was hosted 
by BCIN' and Senator Paul 
Harold (D-Quincy), 

The nine-day seminar 
allows 19 group participants 
to explore community 
development issues through 
state Msits to a >-arietv of local 



organizations including the 
Greater Roxbury Neighbor- 
hood Authority. AIDS 
Action Committee, the 
Boston Food Bank and Villa 
Viaoria. 

For more information 
about BCIV activities and 
membership, call 542-8995. 



Sandra Levine of Quincy. a 
senior at Northeastern 
University has won one of six 
$1,000 New England Press 
Association Scholarships for 
1990. 

The scholarships are gi\en 
to students enrolled in 
Northeastern's Journalism 
Program who have demon- 
strated excellence in studies 



and cooperative work and 
have expressed a commitmen! 
to journalism as a career 

The award w ill be presented 
at a luncheon ceremony at the 
New England Press Associa- 
tion's .Annual Convention to 
be held at the Marriott Hotel 
in Cambridge in January 

Levine plans to work for a 
small newspaper after 



graduating In the c .- : 
future she would like t: :e.:..-. 
Engiish or joumaiisrr. 

New England Pre- 
.Association is a Bos!?'-.-ba>ed 
professional newspaper "ace 
association serv:r. ^ j 
membership of app'-.'*- 
imately 55Ct weekly and ?rr-..i 
daily newspapers m s:\ N;'a 
England states. 






lE^tlRV GIFTS 



Rogers 
Jewelers 

•»402 H fvaofc St 

77S-3636 



14 Kt mmaOmg Bvids 
Biiy Or»-G«t 0» f^^^EE 

PHASE II 

Jawalry t QHb 

Oumo* a»ii 4^-tf-ia 



mm 



"I L0VE YOU TRULY' 

wttt 

B4R0MHUG0 
AMD HS ORCHESTRA 



LIWOUSiNES 



HAWKES 
LIMOUSINE 

WEDDINGS 

Starting at MIO,"* 

331-0405 



RECEPTION HALLS 



PHOTOGRAPHER i BRIDAL FASHIONS 



PhoiOQfMphy 



8t^ Hvfvoak 







CATERING 




PRiNTiNG 



Yo»rPTe^rin^ Covers 

or Custom Made 

TNEOUMCYSUN 



Creative Bridals 

54 Billings Rd. 

North QuirK:y 

472-7670 

Hbu«s f,«t «M*< Thuf% 10-9 

**^ r^n a S«! 1&4 VIS* 



BAKERY 



OBRIENS 
BAKERIES 



9BmI» Street 
iiolimoo 



«< 



Have an 

affair with 

Amelia" 

Amelia'^ in Quincy, 
I overlooks M«rin« B«y 
«nth a panoramic vifw ol 
tt» Boston skylio* This 
spacious 120 $e«i 
function room has an 
enltnsivt menu at 
•nwnabtc prices This i$ 
an opan invitation to lOin 
us toi that special 
reception 

Amtlia )s «r»|tii| 
t*rr*»rc«ll! 

A M Fl I AS Jj 



M5y<i«.v5e(M 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Ftowtis ^or AH Occss ons 

SptCUhzmg in W&aHings 
TwepfKvr* 4'l->3772 



QUINTREE 

FLORIST 

Specialising m R«sh & Silks 

Op»n 7 day* •no 6 ntg/r\t% 
444 OuirKv Av» Br»«mrM 

84«-9075 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So Art«ry 
Ouincy 

773-7620 



Barry s 
Flower Shop 

Flowers to' all occasions 

53"-0970 

1000 Washir>gton Street 

Bramtree MA 





Thursday, January 4, 1990 Quincy Sun Paje 7 



MARGUERITE FLAVIN, right, is welcomed as a new 
trustee uf Aquinas Junior College in Milton, by President 
Dorothy Mulcahy Oppenheim. 

(Sam Creenwald phiiio) 

Quincy Women's Club 
Cheers Patients At Hospital 



The Quincy Women's Club 
recently joined the Commun- 
ity Club of Canton, as 
members of the Massachu- 
setts State Federation of 
Women's Clubs in presenting 
a Christmas celebration for 
patients at the Brockton 
Veterans Administration 
Hospital. 

Baked goods and gifts were 
distributed and Christmas 
music given in the activity 
room. 

Directing the festivities 
were members of the Veterans 



Committee. 

The next club meeting will 
be Tuesday, Jan. 9 at 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. Following the noon 
coffee hour, Mrs. John 
Dobbie will conduct the 
business meeting. Book 
reviews will be presented by a 
staff member of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library. 

Hostesses will be the 
American Home Committee, 
Mrs. Arthur Peterson, 
chairman. 



Catholic Daughters 
Recognition Night 



Court Corpus Christi, 
Catholic Daughters of the 
Americas, will honor its past 
grand regents tonight 
(Thursday), at an 8 p.m. 
Recognition Night at St. 
Thomas Aquinas Hall, 
Darrow St. 



The Court, entering its 63rd 
year, will honor eight of its 
former grand regents with 
gifts presented by Dorothy 
Laing, present grand recent. 

Ann Connolly is in charge 
of arrangements. 



Nancy Steeves 
In Students 'Who's Who' 



Nanc\ M. Steeves. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Eugene Steeves of Wollaston, 
has been selected as a national 
outstanding student leader by 
Who's Who Among Students 
in American Universities and 
Colleges. 1990. 

A 1986 graduate of North 
Quincy High School. Miss 



Steeves is a senior political 
science major at .Stonehill 
College. North Easton. 

She joins an elite group of 
students selected from over 
1,400 institutions of higher 
learning. 

Save Gas and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



Social 




MR. and MRS. ROBERT MacKENZIE 



(Mclnlire's Sliiilin) 



Karen Corliss Married 
To Robert MacKenzie 



Karen Corliss, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Corliss 
of Quincy recently became the 
bride of Robert MacKenzie. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
MacKen/ie. also of Quincy. 

The double ring ceremony 
took place at St. Joseph's 
Church. Quincy. with Rev. 
Joseph Raeke officiating. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 
Kathleen Corliss, the bride's 
sister, was her maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Patty 
Corliss of Quincy. the bride's 
sister-in-law; Donna Botsch 
of Hanover, the bride's 
cousin; Patty McLaughlin of 
Hyde Park; Pam MacKenzie 
and Diane MacKenzie, both 
of Abington and both sisters- 
in-law of the bridegroom. 

Scott M3'"'^'""^ie of 



Abington was best man for his 
brother. Ushers were John 
MacKenzie of Abington, the 
bridegroom's brother; 
Tommy Corliss of Quincy, the 
bride's brother; Garry Gillis 
of Dorchester. Kevin Pitts of 
Quincy and George McCarron 
of Middlebury. 

A reception was held at the 
Sons of Italy Hall. 

After a wedding cruise to 
Florida, the couple are living 
in Weymouth. 

The bride, a 1982 graduate 
of Sacred Heart School, is 
employed by the Department 
of Mental Health. 

The bridegroom graduated 
from Quincy Vocational- 
Technical School in 1981 and 
is imployed by Finch 
Engraving. 



ENTRANCE - SCHOLARSHIP 
EXAMINATION 

For New Students Entering 9th & 10th Grades 
JANUARY 13 OR FEBRUARY 22, 1990 

NO FEE IS CHARGED FOR THIS EXAM 

Newman po'[,'nTJ"i745 School 

245 Marlborough St., Boston, MA 02116 

COEDUCATION - GRADES 9-12 

FULL and PARTIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

to be awarded for the term beginning Sept. 10, 1990 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, SEE YOUR 

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR OR CALL 

THE NEWMAN SCHOOL (267-4530) 



ICE SKATING 

CLASSES 

Children 

& Aduhs 

M.D.C. Rinks 

Cleveland Cjcie 

H\ae Parh Dedhar 

Jarnaita -".air 

Meaioro 

Mil I on 

Newiop Bnahior 

North tnd 

Revere 

Wa:riarr, 

IVest Roxburv 

6 Lessons 
$45.00 ■ Child 
$54.00 Aduit 

includes rink .iC'i^siT' 




Starts Mid-Jan. : 

r • 

Lji nou. a 

reijisrrii'iiir i : • 

965-4460 : 

BAY STATE : 

SKATING : 

SCHOOL : 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY | 

■ I Lb WW ^^ ID slightly higher 



TUBS. 4 THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

HIS M3 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

Long hair 
PERM SPECIAL - ^ 

UNIPERM 



GOLDWELL complete 

CCCRn *''9htly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay 

FOAM PERM *55^" - "«- ^- sculptured Na... 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



Cn slightly higher 
Complete 




JOHN "JAKE" COMER, Past National American Ugion 
Commander, presents Kid Kits to Quincy Kindergarten 
teachers. With him uc Dorothy Greene, Assistant Principal 
of the Uncoln-Hancocii School and Georgina Valantef, the 
School's Health Coordinator. 

(Quincy Sun phoio by Tom Gorman) 



Wollaston Mothers Club 
To Hear Pharmacist 



The Wollaston Mothers 
Club will meet Thursday, Jan. 
25 at the Wollaston 
Congregational Church, 
corner of Lincoln and 
Winthrop Ave. Wollaston. 

Guest speaker will be 
Bonnie Seeley, registered 
pharmacist of Blackwood 



Pharmacy, Wollaston. 

Hostesses for the 1 1 :30 a.m. 
luncheon will be the 
Reception Committee chaired 
by Mrs. Pat Spring. 

Reservations and money 
for the sleigh/ hay ride in 
February will be due at this 
meeting. 



Sweet Adelines At 1000 S.A. 



The Sweet Adeline Singers 
will perform in the 
auditorium at 1000 Southern 
Artery on Monday, Jan. 8, at 



8 p.m. 

The women's group of the 
Barber Shop singers is 
directed by Martina Duffy. 



iJA!AJLJJJJL>LX.UJJx^L!J.JJ.!J^X^J.AJJ;>LIJLI^ 




Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Formerly the 

Winfield House Restaurant 



Dapt. 56 Snow Vlllag* 
YankM CandlM 
Nutcracfctra A Smokara 



Basalt Pm8« Gutmann 
Maudt Humphrey 
Auathi Scuiphiraa 



l^mti? 



Open 7 Days A Week 
10:00 A.M. — 10:00 P.M. 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 47^9784 



□mmmmmmmmfflffiffi^^ffl^^ffiffiffl£ 



i l l * m 



^ i'JoucA Of ^/a^ 



\ 



All specials performed by one ol Russell s stall 
Russell Edward s 



Pedicures S22 
Body and Facial Waxing Available" 



0/(/i/l/i//7a: (^'-^le 



OPEN 9-5 DAILY WED. THURS & FRI EVENINGS 
Corner Hancock Chestnut & Maple Sis 1 Maple St . Qumcy 472-1060 




a..":::,o 



h" 



11) 



Senior 

Citizens 

Discount 



S^Knie 



po^ 



SO' 





Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. - 5 30 P M 



p^_^^^^.....^H«>^M^^^ open Thu»s •»t4 irt 8 30 

28 Green Kwood A»e , [ | ' 

woii»jion \ \ 773-5266 

aeon tfOTi ifte MBT A \ X 



VISA 



■MPS! 



Pace 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 



Two Residents Receive 
MBTA Board Awards 



Quincy residents Julie 
Lcvine and James F. Folk are 
two of seven recipients of the 
MBTA Board of Directors' 



Customer Service Awards. 

Levine, a Collector/ Gate- 
person on the Red Line 
stationed at Harvard Square 



AUTO INSURANCE 

There is a difference!!! 

• Free registry service ($10 value) 

• Appointments at your convenience 

• Convenient location and free parking 

• Free review/quote - clarify 1989 
auto changes, receiving all credits 

• Monthly payment plans available 

• We still make house calls 

P.S. FREE Homeowners Insurance review/ 
quotes are also available. 

Kelleher & Mackey Insurance 

The Willord Building 

1266 Furnace Brook Parkway, #208 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617/479-7621 



Station, and Folk, an 
Assistant District Supervisor 
on the Red Line, were 
congratulated by Gov. 
Michael Dukakis at a press 
conference announcing the 
Ts latest Customer Survey, 
which found a 92 percent 
satisfaction rate among T 
passengers. 

"It's hard-working people 
like Julie Levine and Jim Folk 
who have helped us to reach 
this new level of customer 
satisfaction," said MBTA 
General Manager Thomas P. 
Glynn. "They're familiar faces 
to many Red Line passengers, 
and have received many 
commendations from cus- 
tomers for their helpfulness 
and courteous manner. They 
do a great job making people 
feel good about their 
commute, and we value their 
dedication, positive attitude, 
and concern for the people we 
serve each day." 

Levine has worked for the T 
for six years, and Folk 16 
years. 



Save Gas and Money . 
Shop Locally 



Reaction To Sheets 
Inaugural Address 



Reacting to Mayor James 
A. Sheets' Inaugural Address 
Tuesday, several present 
legislators and former Quincy 
officials said the new mayor 
has a realistic approach in 
meeting the challenges ahead, 
most notably city finances. 

Senator Paul Harold: "I 
thought that he gave an 
overview of the major issues 
facing the city, most 
important the role of the state 
as far as local aid and the 
amount of local aid and 
charges that are being levied 
on the community. So I think 
at the state level, the city 
level's main concern, for at 
least the next year and 
probably two years is going to 
be revenues and where those 
revenues are coming from if 
there's a continued shortfall in 
state government which we 
anticipate." 

State Representative 
Robert Cerasoli: "I think Jim 
has a very realistic approach. I 



think Jim has a tough road 
ahead but I think he's going to 
approach it realistically and 
hopefully everyone can work 
together." 

State- Representative Steve 
Tobin: "I wholeheartedly 
agree with his attitude which 
is it's not the force of the gale 
but the set of the sail. 
Everybody's got tough times. 
It's how we handle this 
situation that I think will 
determine how well we'll 
come out of it. I intend to be 
as helpful as I possibly can. I 
think we're in for a solid two 
years of hard work and we're 
going in the right direction 
and that's what's important. 
We got off on the right foot 
today and I'm very pleased to 
be a part of it." 

Attorney and former 
District Attorney and former 
City Councillor George 
Burke: "I was very impressed 
with it. I think he's going to be 
a great mayor. I look forward 



to his administration the next 
two years. I think it will be ;i 
progressive one and I think u 
will be productive of the issues 
that involve the city." 

Norfolk County Treasurer 
and former Ward 2 (it\ 
Councillor Daniel Raymondi: 
"I served with Jimmy on the 
City Council; he's a man ot 
integrity and he has a great 
future ahead of him and he 
has a good vision for the City 
of Quincy. I think his 
combination of talents of his 
education ability, his abilit\ 
to bring people together of 
varied backgrounds is going 
to serve him well. In his 
speech, he referred to the 
problems the city is having 
economically and financialK 
and I think it's going to 
require an awful lot of his 
abilities in order to bring 
together all the aspects, both 
practically and politically, to 
make sure there's a good 
solution to those problems " 



MEAT RAFFLE 

North Quincy 
Knights Of Columbus 

5 Holiis Avenue 

Saturday, Jan. 6th 

Door Prizes Door* op«n at 12.00 Noon Consolation Prizes 
This Ad Re-deemable for 1 ($2.00) Raffle 

RAFFLE START TIME 1:00 P.M. 

FREE ADMISSION FREE COFFEE & SANDWICHES 



Seasonal Employment 

Opportunities At Adams 

National Historic Site 



The Adams National 
Historic Site, Quincy, is 
accepting applications for 
full-time and part-time 
seasonal employment for the 
period April 19, 1990 through 
November 10. 

The National Park includes 
the birthplaces of the second 
and sixth Presidents, John 
and John Quincy Adams. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Also included at the site is the 
Adams Mansion, home to 
John and John Quincy 
Adams, our Civil War 
Minister to England, Charles 
Frances Adams, and two 
literary historians, Henry and 
Brooks Adams. Park Rangers 

greet the public, conduct 
guided tours and protect the 
park resources. 

To be eligible for seasonal 
employment, applicants must 
be at least 18 years of age and 
submit their applications 



(Standard Form 171) to the 
Adams National Historic 
Site, P.O. Box 531. 135 
Adams St., Quincy, MA 
02269, no later than Feb. I. 
1990. Filling positions will 
start the first two weeks of 
March. Applications may be 
obtained by contacting the 
Administrative Office at 
(617)773-1177, Monday 
through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. The Adams National 
Historic Site is an equal 
opportunity employer. 




Quality 
Printing 

at a 

Reasonable 
Price 



Program Books, Brochures, 

Newspapers, Newsletters, Political 

Flyers, Tickets, Stationery, Resumes 

and Typesetting. 

Is Also Our Specialty. 






1372 Hanco<-k St.. Quincy S«|iian' 

471-3100 



AAeradith Salenger in 
Walt Disnty Pictures' 

THE JOURNEY OF 
NATTY GANN 

The exciting sago of a young girl who emborlcs 
on o danger-filled adventure across America in 
search of her father. Also starring John Cusack. 

SATURDAY JANUARY 6 7PM 



The ■5)^^)e^ Channel 

Americas Family Network 



Jewelry 
Workshop 

"The South Shore's Source 
For Jewelry Repair" 

Diamond Setting, Remounts 

Repairs 

Bead Stringing 

Makers of Unique Jewelry 

All Work Done on Premises 

53 Franklin St. Quincy, MA 

328-1961 



Thursday, January 4. 1990 Quincy Sun P«|e 9 




Text Of Mayor Sheets Inaugural Address 



(Cont'd /mm Pane 5> 

ways to utili/c retired teachers 
and administrators whose 
years ot experience, grasp ol 
education fundamentals, and 
understanding ol \oung 
people would add a valuable 
dimension to our public 
school system. It is my 
intention to become deeply 
involved in ail aspects of the 
educational process. Kor 
education must and will 
provide the real dynamics for 
change in the Quincy of 
tommorow. 

In closing. 1 want to thank 
the people of Quincy lor this 
opportunity to serve them, 
and also Mayor Frank 
McCauley for making this 
period of transition from one 



administration to another so 
productive and positive. 

We will search for solutions 
to our economic problems. 
We will graple creatively with 
those quality of lilc issues. As 
the old mariner would say. 
whether we succeed or fail, 
will depend, not on the force 
of the gale, but the set of the 
sail. Not on the intensity of 
our problems, but on our 
response to them. We will 
succeed not because we 
suddenly find $I5,(X)().(K)0 in 
new revenue, nor because we 
have suddenly found the key 
to defeating a toxic waste 
incinerator. We will succeed 
because we have learned the 
secret of leadership -- that the 
hopes for our tutu re rests not 
on the grandness of nur plans 



but in the character of our 
people. It rests not in our own 
self-confidence but in the 
richness of our heritage, in 
roots planted deep in our soil 
by generations of men and 
women who have taught us 
common decency, respect and 
love for others. We will 
succeed because we know that 



trust is more important than 
the exercise of power, that 
leadership must be conscien- 
tious and accountable, 
because we will listen before 
we act. We will succeed 
because we will drink at the 
well-spring of public life ~ 
caring about others. Let us all 
begin together right now. 



3 Residents Honored 
At Wentworth 



BEFORE LEAVING OFFICE Tuesday, former Mayor 
Francis X. IMcCauley hung his official portrait, tup right, 
along with photos of the city's other mayors on the third floor 
of City Hall. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charle* Flang) 

Peter Curley, Jr. Promoted In A.F. 

Peter J. Curley, Jr., son of School, Braim^e. 
Peter and Barbara J. Curley 
of 24 Madison Ave., Quincy, 
has been promoted in the U.S. 
Air Force to the rank of 
airman first class. 

Curley is an apprentice law 
enforcement specialist with 
the 633rd Security Police 
Squadron at Andersen Air 
Force Base, Guam. 

He is a 1988 graduate of 
Archbishop Williams High 



Three Quincy employees of 
Wentworth Institute of 
Technology, were among 51 
honored recently during an 
annual awards ceremonie. 

Gift items were presented 
by Dr. Edward T. Fitzpatrick, 
Wentworth president, to 
marguerite Monahan, West 
Quincy, assistant to the 
registrar, 10 years service; 
Michael O'Connell, lead 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 

Golden Lion Suite 




Sp«ak to Rita ~ iht's our rtnlal ag«nl 
ipaclalliing In complal* wadding 
packaga plant and all ettiar occaalont. 
Tha Goldan Lion SuNa aceomodalea up 
to 300. Tha Vonatlan Room up to 140 
guatta. GIva Rita a call lor an 
appdnlmant lor your raaarvatton. Naw 
brochuraa ara avallaMa. 

(Air CondHlonad) 

CALL 

Quincy Sons of llaly Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER Is 472-5900 



1 



INJURED? 

Over 25 years 
experience 

in trial of personal 
injury cases. 

Free Consultation 

Call for Appointment 

I- . 
Attorney 

Richard W. Barry 

J39 Hancock St. 
Quincy 328-6900 



MR. Drs 

SPECIAL HOLIDAY SALE 
Dec. 8th thru Jan. 15th 

Buy I Suit for Regular Price 

Get 2nd Suit for only $25.oo 

Top Coats, Rain Coats, Sports Coats 

Sweaters, Pants, Shirts, Ties, and Accessories 

All at Special Holiday Prices 

Open Every Night M-F till 9:00 PM 

Sat. Nights till 5:30 PM 

Open every morning M-S sharply at 9:00 AM 

. MR.ors 

^%o^^ 263 Copeiand St., W. Quincy 
^° Tel. 472-6894 



In the dark 
about 



insurance 5 



We'll show you 
the light. 

Riley & Rielly 

Insurance Agency, Inc. 

1C50 Hancock Strcet TD. Box 351 Quincy-, MA 02269-0351. 

617/471-6015 



technician, Wentworth 
Technical School, 5 years 
service; and David Wahl- 
strom, director of physical 
plant, 10 years service. 




\ I • r i< I >- I ii I \ I s • r I \ I I 



A special place in Downtown 

Quincy warmly welcomes its 

new retail tenant 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




LAZZARiNO 

BUONO APPETITO! 

Open Monday - Saturday 7 AM - 7 PM 

PRESIDENTS PLACE 

Hancock and Washington Streets 

Downtown Quincy 



THE LEGAL ADVICE AND 
REFERRAL CLINIC (LARC) 



DO YOU HAVE A LEGAL QUESTION - 

OR - ARE YOU CONFUSED 

ABOUT A LEGAL ISSUE? 



THE BAR ASSOCIATION OF NORFOLK COUNTY ARE 
NOW SPONSORING LEGAL CLINICS AT THE QUINCY 
DISTRICT COURT ON A WALK-IN FIRST COME FIRST 
SERVED BASIS. THERE WILL BE ATTORNEYS THERE 
TOASSISTANDGUIDEYOUINANYAREAOFTHELAW 
YOU MAY NEED ASSISTANCE IN. THE ATTORNEYS ON 
STAFF WILL PROVIDE FREE LEGAL ADVICE AND 
INFORMATION TO YOU. THIS SERVICE IS A PUBLIC 
COMMUNITY SERVICE AND WILL BE HELD ON THE 
FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY EVENINGS FROM THE 
HOURS OF 6:00 P.M. TO 8:00 P.M. 



WEDNESDAY EVENINGS: 
JANUARY 10, 1990 
FEBRUARY?, 1990 
MARCH 7, 1990 
APRIL 4, 1990 
MAY 2. 1990 
JUNE 6, 1990 



ADRIENNE CLARKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
BAR ASSOCIATION OF NORFOLK COUNTY 






J 



Page !• Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 



Church News 



Ecumenical Epiphany Feast 
Of Lights At Sacred Heart 



Epiphany Celebration 
At WoUaston Congregational 



Epiphany will be celebrated 
at Wollaston Congregational 
Church, Winthrop and 
Lincoln Sts., on Sunday, Jan. 
7 at 10 a.m. worship. 

A church family will place 
the Three Wise Men figurines 
at the manger scene, with their 
arrival completing the story of 
Christmas. 

"God's Chosen One" will be 
the sermon topic of the Rev. 
Elden D.J. Zuern. He will 
speak on God's servant whom 



he has chosen to bring justice 
to all nations, and through 
him God will make a covenant 
to all nations to bring light to 
them. Who is God's Chosen 
One? 

Scripture reader will be 
Steve Gutro, while greeters 
will be Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Todd. Ushers are Laurel 
Oster and Gilda Knowles, 
while David Mauriello is 
acolyte. 

Sunday School teachers 



and the Christian Education 
Committee will hold a 
seminar during the 10 a.m. 
service. Sunday School and 
Nursery will begin also at 10 
a.m. 

The baptism of David 
William Arthur Abbott will 
take place. He is the son of 
David and Susan (Higgins) 
Abbott, and the grandson of 
Mr. and Mrs. William 
Abbott, church members, and 
great-grandson of Rebecca 
Graves. 



^Is Jesus For Everyone?' 
Epiphany Sermon At Bethany 



The public is invited to 
attend the 13th annual 
Ecumenical Epiphany Feast 
of Lights service at Sacred 
Heart Church, North Quincy, 
Sunday, Jan. 7 at 7:30 p.m. 

The event will be enriched 
by the original costumes. 
Sponsored by the Inter- 
Church Council of North 
Quincy and Wollaston which 
lists 12 member congrega- 
tions. 

This service will feature the 
choir and the brass ensemble 
of the Nazarene College, 
under the direction of Prof. 
Robert Howard. The First 
Baptist Church of Wollaston 
choir will render a speciahy 
with the college choir under 
the direction of Robert Brown 
and organist Lambart 
Brandes of the church of the 



Nazarene. 

Dr. Richard C. Malmquist 
of The First Baptist Church of 
Wollaston will deliver a brief 
homily. Clergy and laity from 
all member churches will 
participate. 

Christ was proclaimed the 
Light of the World so we 
celebrate by lighting candles, 
an event representing the 
Light of Christ entering the 
world and gradually 
spreading through time and 
space. "The Candle-light 
ceremony climaxes with each 
worshipper holding a lighted 
candle to carry forth into the 
world." 

A free-will offering will be 
taken fro the Mission of 
Christ in our community 
through the work of Fr. Bill's 
Place. 



A social hour will be held 
and collation served across 
the street in the school 
cafeteria. All worshippers arc 
cordially invited. 

The members of the Inter- 
Church Council include; First 
Baptist Church of WollastDn, 
Episcopal St. Chrysostoms. 
Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Wollaston 
Lutheran, Church of the 
Nazarene, Sacred Heart 
Roman Catholic, Star of the 
Sea, United Church of Christ. 
Memorial Congregational. 
Union Congregational. 
Wollaston Congregational, 
and Quincy Community 
United Methodist church. 

Buses will be available to 
pick up and return at 91 Cla\ 
St., 6:50 p.m.; 80 Clay St., '? 
p.m.; and Fenno House at 
7:10 p.m. 



Ihere will be two services 
on Epiphany Sunday, Jan. 7, 
in Bethany Congregational 
Church, corner of Codding- 
ton and Spear Sts. Quincy 
Center, at 9 a.m. in the chapel 
and at 10 a.m. in the 
sanctuary. 

The 10 o'clock service will 
be broadcast live direct from 
Bethany over radio station 
WJDA, 1300kc. 

Holy Communion will be 
celebrated at both hours. The 



Rev. Elizabeth Upton, 
associate minister, will serve 
as liturgist at both services. 

The Rev. William Arnold, 
senior minister, in his sermon 
will address the question: "Is 
Jesus For Everyone?" 

The Chancel Choir will sing 
the offertory anthem under 
the direction of the organist, 
Charles Blue, Sr. 

The Sunday School will be 
in session from 10 a.m. to 1 1 
a.m. with classes for children 



from pre-school through 9th 
grade. Provisions for child 
care are also available for 
babies in the nursery and for 
toddlers. 

Beginning at 1 1 a.m. 
following the worship, there 
will be a time of fellowship 
with light refreshments in the 
Allen Parlor. 

For additional information 
concerning Bethany's 
ministries and programs 
please contact the church 
office at 479-7300. 



Rev. Gordon Benson 

Guest Speaker At 

Covenant Congregational 



^Giving More To Life' Sermon 
Topic At First Parish Unitarian 



This Sunday Dr. Sheldon 
W. Bennett, minister, will 
deliver the sermon "Giving 



Union Congrtgotional 
Church off Wollaston 

BMch Street at Rawson Road 

Church khod 9 o.m. 
Sun. Worship 10 o.m. 

479-6661 (Child Care Provided) 
Rev. Zaven Oohanian, Pasto: 

Join Us In Faith 
and F>llowship 



More to Life" at United First 
Parish Church, Unitarian, in 
Quincy Center. The sermon 
will consider how to get more 
out of life by giving more of 
oneself to life. The regular 
Sunday service begins at 10:30 
a.m 
Norman Corey, music 



EVERY DAY (ALL THE 
DAILY BIBl£' 
472-4434 

QUINCY POINT 
CONG»GATX)NAi CHURCH 

iOtHll OF SOUTHUN AITIIT 
AND WASHINGTON '.^ OUINCT 



director, will play organ 
works by Bach and Rheinberger. 
Matthew Malloy and Philip 
Curtis will usher, and Richard 
Post will be greeter. 

Visitors are welcome and 
are invited to the social hour 
following the service. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the Presidents," is 
located at 1306 Hancock St., 
opposite City Hall and the T 
Station. 

Church school and child 
care are provided. Call 773- 
1290 for information. 



At the 10:45 AM worship 
service this Sunday at 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, Whitwell and 
Granite Sts., Rev. Gordon 
Benson will be the guest 
speaker. 

Co-pastors Rev. Kathleen 
Graves and Rev. Kirk 
Johnson will be away. Rev. 
Benson was the interim pastor 
for several months in 1989. 

The choir will be directed 
and accompanied on the 
organ by Richard Smith, 
Minister of Music. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for ages nursery 
through adult, will begin at 



9:30 a.m. During the worship 
service, a nursery is available 
for children age five and 
under. The attendant will be 
Lori-Anne Facella. 

Immediately following the 
service, coffee will be served in 
the fellowship hall down- 
stairs. For the month of 
January, Nancy and Don 
Johnson will co-host. 

Coming events include: 
Prayer Week, Jan. 9-11. The 
theme this year is "Renewing 
our Commitment to One 
Another" with services 
Tuesday, Jan. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the home of Linda and David 
Day, Wednesday, Jan. 10 at 



6:30 p.m. at the church and 
Thursday, Jan. 1 1 at 7:30 p. m 
at the parsonage. 

There will be a winter 
retreat at Pilgrim Pines in 
New Hampshire from Jan. 14 
to 15. On Saturday, Jan. 2(i, 
there will be an all church 
work day beginning at 9 am 
The annual meeting will be 
held Sunday, Jan. 28. After 
the worship service, there will 
be a sandwich luncheon, 
following which the business 
meeting will be held. 

For more information 
about any of the church^ 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



Peter O'Connell Elected 
To Catholic Charities Board 



Catholic Charities- 
Archdiocese of Boston has 
elected Peter F. O'Connell of 



Quincy to its 
Trustees for 1990. 



Board of O'Connell is a partner at 
O'Connell Brothers Manage- 
ment Co. in Marina Bav. 



Mary Scholfield Corporator At Milton Hospital 



Mary Schofield of 
Squantum was recently 
named a corporator of Milton 



Hospital's parent company, 
the Milton Hospital 



The Covenant Congregational Church 

315 Whitwell Street. Quincy 

I 
Invites YOU to worship 

with them each Sunday 



Morning Worship 

10:00 a.m. 

Rev. KathiMn J. GravM 

Rov. Kirk E. Johnson 

PMtort 




Foundation. Inc. Election^ 
were held at the 1989 Annual 
Meeting. 






CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHURCH 



l» 



65 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

Sunday School 

Morning Worship 

Evening Service 

Wed. Evenings 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 



9:30 am 

10:45 a.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 



10:45 AM: A Balanced Ministry 
6:00 PM: Expect Great Things 

Afliliated with: Baptist General Conference 
Northeast Baptist Conference 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son 
Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 



Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informal look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St., Quincy 773-1021 




FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

20 Greenleaf St., Quincy 

Cordially invites you and 

your family to attend 

Sunday Services ;)t 10:30 a.m. 

Sunday School Is held at 

the same time. 

Wednesday Evening 
Meetings begin at 7:30 p m. 

Child Care is available both 
Sunday and Wednesday 

Come and hear how Bible truths heal. 




m 



T\ 



Church 
Saint John the 
Baptist 

44 School SI. Qufncy, Mat* 

PASTOR 
Rev. William R. McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev. James C. Tuxbury 

Rev. Gary S. Sullivan 

Rev. Richard McEntee 

Rev. Theodore L. Fortier 

(Oulncy City Hospital Chaplain) 

Rev. Mr. Charles Sullivan, 

- _ - ^ (Deacon) 

MASS SCHEDULE 



Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 
week Days: 8 am and 5:30 pm 



r 



1 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner Southern Artery 
and Wastiingtori St Oumcy 

Church School 9:30 AJl 
Worihip «t 10:30 A.M. 

Rev Fred Atwood-Lyn' 

Rev (_d'ol E Alwood t yon 

773 6424 (ChildCare provided) 

Call The Daily Bible 4/? 443') 



Wollaston ChufLi: 
of the fNazarene 





37 E. 



Elm Ave., Wollaston 
— Services — 

Sunday n 00 » m 4 6 00 p m 

Wednesday 7 00 p m 

"Your Community Church 



Thursday, January 4, 1990 Ou'ncy Sun Page II 




Spotlight On 
HEALTH 

AND 

FITNESS 




Acupuncture 

Relieves 

Headaches 



Except for the common 
cold, headache, is the leading 
complaint of many people. 
About 42 million individuals 
undergo headaches so severe 
that they often have to stay 
away from work and suffer at 
home. Of these, only about 
10% have headaches that are 
due to serious organic disease. 

Most patients are diagnos- 
ed as having migraine 
headaches, also called tension 
headaches. A careful 
examination will sometimes 
uncover that these headaches 
without any organic disorder 
have their origin in the food, 
drink or nicotine habit of the 
patients. Stress can also be a 
cause. 

Using acupuncture to treat 
the various types of headaches 
is well established. Depending 
on the headache category, 
results can vary from 
excellent to ineffective. A 
long-term study conducted at 
the University of Alabama 
Medical Center, Birmingham, 
leveals some surprising 
results. 

In this study, question- 
naires were sent to patients 
following acupuncture 
treatment for headaches. To 
establish length of pain 
reliefe, questionnaires were 
forwarded six months after 
treatments had been 
completed. 



It was found that 
acupuncture treatments 
gave valuable long-term 
relief. For most patients, 
frequency, duration and 
severity of attacks decreased 
significantly. When short- 
term evaluation was used, the 
percentage of patients who 
responded to treatment was 
over 80 per cent. When longer 
time periods were involved, 
the ratio of patients with 
favorable responses decreas- 
ed. Six months after their last 
acupuncture treatment, 45 per 
cent of patients were still 
receiving notable relief from 
pain. 

One remarkable discovery 
was made at a medical college 
in Taiwan. It was found that 
treating a single point on the 
foot resulted in almost instant 
pain relief in patients 
suffering from tension 
headache at the temple 
region. Of these, 75 per cent 
obtained relief within 15 
secons, while another 12 per 
cent of patients required up to 
five minutes for pain to 
disappear. 

"Only pre-sterilized 
disposable acupuncture 
needles are used. For further 
information, call Daniel S. 
Karp, lie. A.C. Acupuncture 
Associates of the South 
Shore. 471-5577. 





Jerusalem artichokes offer large amounts of calcium, 
sodium, phosphorus, sulfur, iron, chlorine and mag- 
nesium. 



Chiropractic 
Update 

by 

Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 



WHAT IS SCOLIOSIS? 

Scoliosis is oneof several medical "buzz words" such 
as arthritis or cancer which seem to immediately 
conjure up fearful thoughts for many of us, but whose 
real meanings are often misunderstood. Technically, 
Scoliosis is defined as an abnormal curvature of the 
spine in the anterior to posterior perspective or as you 
were to look at another person face to face. The 
concept of curvature of the spine is somewhat 
confusing because, when we look at each other from 
the side or lateral perspective: there should be curves 
apparent in our spines which are perfectly normal and 
essential to proper postural mechanics. Typically a 
patient with scholiosis may not even have any back 
pain, but may appear to have poor posture, holding one 
shoulder or hip higher than the other or having one 
shoulder blade more prominent than the other. The 
exact causes for why Scoliosis occurs in a patient are 
not fully known, but it does seem to "run in families" 
indicating a definite genetic relationship. 

Scholiosis may develop slowly and quietly with no 
pain felt in early childhood but seems to become more 
noticeable as the children enter their early teens. 
Young girls are affected more often than boys and they 
seem to be more vulnerable to scoliosis as they 
experience the tremendous hormonal changes 
associated with the onset of their menstrual cycle. 

Proper evaluation and treatment is especially crucial 
during "progressive stages" of scoliosis when the 
curvature may get much worse in a relatively short 
period of time. The doctor of chiropractic, with 
intensive training and knowledge of the spine, is 
eminently qualified to check for and treat scoliosis. 

If you have any questions or would like to make an 
appointment, please call Dr. Mark Jaehnig. a lifelong 
Quincy resident at Ouincy Chiropractic Office. 440 
Hancock St. North Ouincy. 773-4400. 



Do You Suffer From? 

• Migraines 

• Back Pain/ Sciatica 

• Arthritic Pain 

• Sports Injuries 

• Obesity 

• Inability to Stop 
Smoking 




Daniel S. Karp 
Licensed Acupunturist 

471-5577 

Conveniently Located 

in Quincy Sq. near T Station! 

12 Dimmock St. Ouincy 



ACUPUNCTURE ASSOCIATES 

OF THE SOUTH SHORE 



Can Help . . . 

Acupuncture works by stimulating the 
body's own healing abilities. 
Acupuncture Associates of the South Shore 
is a medical health service specializing in the 
treatment of chronic pain, as well as offering 
traditional preventive care. Accepted by 
many insurance companies. 

*Pre-Slerilized 
DispoKable INeedles 




Quincy World Gym 

NEW YEAR SPECIAL 



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M-F 6 a.m. -10 p.m. 
Sat . 8 a.m. • 8 p.m. 
Sun. 9 a.m. - 4.p.m. 




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Plenty of Free Parking 

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One Block from 

N. Quincy M.B.IA. Station 



GYM 

QUINCY 

& FITNESS CENTER 



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15,000 lbs of Freeweights 
0\/er 120 Workout Stations 
New 1 ,1 00 sq. ft. Aerobic Room 
Tanning Beds 

Personalized Workout Programs 
Weight Training/Body Building 

and 



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Health and Juice Bar 

SeparateSaunas/Steam/Showers/ 

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Vitamins and Supplements 

Workout Accessories 

Heavy Bag 



A COMPLETE LINE OF WORLD GYM SPORTSWEAR! 



^ Memberships ^ 

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GYM 



& FITNESS CENTER 

95 Holmes Street 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 02171 

(617)472-9525 

MORE CLASSES TO COME 



Memberships 
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WORLDGYM . ,-r^^ r^.r^ ^^. . .-r>. .. .- 95 Holmes Street 

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Page 12 Q«ln«y Sun Thunday, January 4, IWO 

M. Jeanette Greene 

Retired Telephone Co. Manager 



A funeral Mass for M. 
Jeanette Greene of Quincy 
was celebrated Dec. 27 at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel 
Church, 227 Sea St. Burial 
was in Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Miss Greene, a retired 
Business service center 
manager for New England 
Telephone, died Dec. 23 in 
South Shore Hospital in 
Weymouth after a brief 
illness. 

Miss Greene was employed 
for 37 years by New England 
Telephone, she retired 10 
years ago. 



She was born in Boston. 
She graduated from Bridge- 
water State College. 

Miss Greene was the 
president of Thomas 
Sherman Chapter of the New 
England Telephone Pioneers 
in Boston. 

She was the daughter of the 
late Coleman A. Greene and 
the late Mary "Daisy" 
(McCarthy) Greene-Allender, 
and the stepdaughter of the 
late John AUender. She is 
survived by many cousins. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 333 Hancock St. 



John E. Dahlquist, 61 

Certified Public Accountant 



A funeral Mass for John E. 
Dahlquist, 61, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Dec. 27 at St. 
Boniface Church, Shed St., 
Quincy. Burial was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Dahlquist, a certified 
public accountant for 30 
years, died Dec. 22 at the 
Veteran's Administration 
Hospital in Miami, Fla., after 
a brief illness. 

Mrs. Dahlquist retired in 
1985. He was born in Quincy. 

He graduated from Bentley 
College and Suffolk 
University. He served in the 
Navy during World War II 



and in the Army during the 
Korean War. 

Mr. Dahlquist is survived 
by his wife. Mary T. (Curran) 
Dahlquist; a son. John E. 
Dahlquist Jr.. of Quincy; four 
daughters, Deborah Ann 
Dahlquist and Denise 
Dahlquist, both of Quincy, 
and Diane Dahlquist and 
Donna Dahlquist, both of 
New Jersey; and two 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made to 
St. Boniface Church. 




D. Scott Oewara;' 



> A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK 

We havt been asked many 
time*, "Why the trend toward 
arranging one's own funeral In 
advance?" 

There are many reaaona for pre- 
arranglng/pre-financlng a 
funeral. Some people are left 
alone In this world and want the 
assurance of a decent funeral and burial; others feel a 
responsibility to alleviate some of the stress upon the 
survivors ... It relieves them of making countless 
decisions at a difficult time in their lives. 

YES, today, there are as many reasons for pre- 
arranglng/pre-flnancing funerals as there are people 
requesting them. 

At Deware Funeral Home, we encourage those 
Interested In pre-arranging and/or pre-financing to 
contact us at any time. We will gladly assist you at no 
cost or obligation ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

Tel: 472^1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist. 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Obituaries 

Joseph P. Abbott, 76 

Retired School Principal 



Helen E. Hannon, 86 

Mother Of Former Mayor 



A funeral mass for Joseph 
Abbott, 76, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Dec. 29 at St. 
John's church. Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Mr. Abbott, a retired 
Boston school principal, died 
Dec. 25 at Quincy Hospital. 

Mr. Abbott worked in the 
school system for I S years and 
retired in 1985 as principal of 
the John F. Kennedy School. 
He previously worked in the 
Quincy schools. 

He was a retired Army 
Reserve lieutenant colonel 
who served in the Army Air 
Corps with the Fifth Fighter 
Group in China during World 
War n. 

Mr. Abbott was a member 
of the Cyril P. Morrisette 
American Legion Post in 
Quincy, a lifelong member of 



the Quincy Disabled 
American veterans and a 
member of Delta Theta Phi, a 
law fraternity. 

He received a bachelor's 
degree and a doctorate degree 
from Boston University and a 
master's degree from Boston 
State Teachers College. 

He was born in Boston and 
lived there before moving to 
Quincy 35 years ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Marie (Manna) Abbott; a 
brother, Myles Abbott of 
Randolph; and four sisters, 
Margaret Lynch of Hingham, 
Evelyn Strachan of Braintree, 
Helen Folan of Boston and 
Loretta Patrolia of Marsh- 
field. He was the brother of 
the late Hugh Abbott. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



A funeral Mass for Helen 
E. (Burke) Hannon. 86. o( 
Louisville, Ky.. formerly of 
Quincy, was celebrated Dec. 
30 by Monsignor Peter Hart 
at St. Ann's Church. Burial 
was in Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Mrs.'Hannon died Dec. 27 
at the Na/areth Home in 
Louisville. 

Mrs. Hannon was the 
mother ol Walter J. Hannon 
of Quincy. former mayor of 
Quincy.j 

She was born in Brookline 
and lived in Quincy for 30 
years and in Kenncbunkport, 
Maine, before moving to 
Kentucky 10 years ago. 

Wife of the late Walter J. 



Hannon. she is also sur\ivcd 
by three daughters. Helen I 
Scalera of Anaheim. Calil., 
Phyllis Hannon. S.C.N, ot 
Louisville, and Sar;ih I 
Went worth of KennebuiA- 
port; 15 grandchildren and 
two great-grandchildren. sIk 
was the sister of the late Maiv 
Lord, William Burke. John 
Burke, and Edmund Burke 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Lydon-Russell Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock Si. 

Donations may be made to 
the Na/areth Home, 2()()() 
New Burg Road. Louisville. 
Ky., 40205 or to the 
Presentation Academy. 861 s 
Fourth St.. Louisville, K\ 
40203. 



Emily M. McGuerty, 91 



Beatrice M. Pitts-Davey, 76 

St. Boniface Church Communicant 



A funeral Mass for Beatrice 
M. (Anderson) Pitts-Davey, 
76, of Quincy, a daily 
communicant of St. Boniface 
Church, Germantown, was 
celebrated Tuesday at the 
church. 

Mrs. Pitts-Davey died Dec. 
29 at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

Born in Brockton, she lived 
in Quincy most of her life. 

Wife of the late James Pitts, 
she is survived by a son, 
George Davey of Halifax; two 



daughters, Ruth Curran and 
Beatrice Burgess, both of 
Abington; a stepdaughter, 
Marjorie Swenton of 
Holbrook; a brother, Thomas 
Anderson of Medfield; a 
sister, Ruth Morrison of 
Brockton; a friend, Lawrence 
Piscitelle; six grandchildren 
and four great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St., Quincy. 



A funeral Mass for Emily 
M. (Gerrior) McGuerty. 91. 
of Quincy, a native of Boston, 
was celebrated Dec. 29 at St. 
Mary of the Nativity Church. 
Scituate Harbor. Burial was 
in .St. Mary's Cemetery. 

Mrs. McGuerty died Dec. 
27 at the Logan Health Care 
Facility after a long illness. 

She grew up in Boston and 



lived 70 years m Quincy. 

Wife of the late .lohn I 
McGuerty. she is survived b\ 
a daughter Audrey M. Barrorr 
of Scituate; a sister. Aliee 
Kinniburgh of Quincy; three 
grandchildren. Brian M 
Barron of Weilcslcy. William 
F. Barron Jr. of Norwell and 
Stephen J. Barron ol 
Rockland; and five greai- 
grandchildren. 



Grace D. Oberg, 91 



Thelma Hagan, 84 



A funeral service for 
Thelma Hagan. 84. of Quincy. 
was conducted Dec. 28 at the 
Church of the Good 
Harvard St., 
Burial was in 
Cemetery. 

a former 

the KW. 

stores, died 



Shepherd. 15 
North Quincy 
Blue Hill 
Braintree. 

Miss Hagan. 
bookkeeper for 
Woolworth Co. 
Dec. 23 at the South Shore 
Hospital. Weymouth, after a 
lon g illness. 

^ TheFlonst 

389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

328-3959 

sine* 1900 



She was a member of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd 
in North Quincy. 

Miss Hagan was born in 
Boston and lived there until 
moving to Quincy in 1972. 

She is survived by a friend, 
Jeanne Mulligan of Wey- 
mouth; and several nieces and 
nephews. She was the sister of 
the late Arthur Hagan and 
sister-in-law of the late Ev ely n 
Hagan. 

Donations may be made to 
the Church of the (iood 
Shepherd. 15 Harvard St., 
North Quincy 02170. 



A funeral service for Grace 
D. (Thorensen) Oberg. 91, of 
Quincy. was held Dec. 30 at 
the IHamel. Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home. 26 
Adams St. Burial was in 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Boston. 

Mrs. Oberg. a member of 
the Quincy Women's Club, 
died Dec. 27 at Sacred Heart 
Hospital in Norristown, Pa., 
while visiting her son in 
Audubon. Pa. 

Mrs. Oberg was a member 
of the Quincy Art As.sociation, 
the Germantown Garden 
Club and All Saints Fpiscopal 



Church in Dorchester. 

She was born and raised in 
Boston and was a graduate ol 
Girls High School in Boston 

She lived in Quiney lor 40 
years. 

Wife of the late Carl \1 
Oberg. she is survived b\ <i 
son. Thor Oberg of Audubon. 
Pa.; three grandchildren I ho: 
Oberg of Chicago, Ro>d 
Oberg of Texas and Shervl 
Villar of Pennsylvania; and 
three great-grandchildren 

Funeral arrangements uerc 
by the Hamel. Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home. 



Mary 'Mamie' Hurliman, 84 



A funeral Mass for 
"Mamie" (Schatzel) Hurliman, 
84, a lifelong Quincy resident, 
was celebrated Tuesday at St. 
Mary's Church, West Quincy. 

Mrs. Hurliman died Dec. 
29 at the Colonial Nursing 
Home in Weymouth after a 
long illness. 

Wife of the late Charles 






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two daughters, Helen Du\al 
of Melrose and Bernice 
DeYoung of Weymouth; a 
brother, William Schat/el of 
Florida; a nephew, the Re\ 
John Schatzel of Blessed 
Kateeri Church in Plymouth; 
nine grandchildren and 10 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Marys 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 326 Copeland St, 
West Quincy. 

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St. Mary's Church Building 
and Restoration Fund, 
Crescent St., West Quincy. 
MA 02169. 



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Bernard Bressler, 80 

Owned Upholstery Firm 



A funeral service for 
Bernard Bressler, 80, of 
Quincy, was held Dec. 27 at 
the Stanetsky Memorial 
Chapel in Brookiine. Burial 
was in the Roxbury Lodge 
Cemetery, West Roxbury. 

Mr. Bressler, who owned 
Bressler Upholstery in 
Boston, died Dec. 27 at 
Quincy Hospital after a 
lengthy illness. 

Born in Vienna, Austria, 
Mr. Bressler emigrated to the 
United States in 1940 with his 
wife. 

He served in the U.S. Army 
during World War II in both 
Europe and the Philippenes. 

He was a member of the 
Congregation Adas Shalom 
in Quincy and its Brother- 
hood 



Clara M. Quinlan, 78 



A funeral Mass for Clara 
M. (I.eMcaux) Quinlan. 78. 
vof Quincy, was celebrated 
r3ec. 29 at St. Ann's Church. 
Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. Mrs. Quinlan, a 
former assembler for the 
Keystone Camera Manu- 
facturing Co., died Dec. 27 at 
Quincy Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Mrs. Quinlan worked 20 
years for Keystone before 
retiring in 1975. 

She was born in Canada 
and lived in Quincy 60 years. 



Wife of the late James P. 
Quinlan, she is survived by 
two sons. James M. Quinlan 
of Avon and Daniel T. 
Quinlan of East Madison. 
Me.; four daughters, 
Elizabeth Dewey of Revere. 
Barbara Dow of Hingham. 
Bernadctte Lanbus of Quincy 
and Claire Badmington of 
Braintree; a brother, Ralph 
LeMeaux; 16 grandchildren 
and three great-grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St., Wollaston. 



Sarah T. Tomasini, 84 



A funeral Mass for Sarah 
T. (Mazzuchelli) Tomasini, 
84, of Quincy, was celebrated 
Dec. 30 at St. John's Church. 
Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Mrs. Tomasini, a native of 
Argentina, died Dec. 28 at 
Quincy Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Mrs. Tomasini also was a 
former resident of Italy. 

She lived 30 years in 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Leo C. 



Tomasini, she is survived by a 
son, Rudolph Tomasini of 
Braintree; two daughters, 
Gloria Tomasini and Barbara 
Egan, both of Quincy; a 
brother, Louis Mazzuchelli of 
Florida; a sister, Rose Reina 
of Sharon; and three 
grandchildren. She was the 
mother of the late Edward 
Tomasini. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Bolea-Buonfiglio 
Funeral Home, 116 Franklin 
St. Quincy. 



James A. Surette, 85 



A funeral Mass for James 
Surette, 85, of Quincy was 
celebrated Dec. 29 at St. 
Ann's church, Wollaston. 

Burial was in Knollwood 
Memorial Park, Canton. 

Mr. Surette, a former 
painter for the N. W. Williams 
Co. of Roslindale died Dec. 
26 at Quincy Hospital. 

Mr. Surette worked for the 
company for 50 years before 
retiring in 1970. 

He was born in Canada and 



lived in Roslindale before 
moving to Quincy two years 
ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Ruth A. (Smith) Surette; a 
daughter, Judith Barrett of 
Quincy; and a sister, Alvina 
Davis of Halifax. He was the 
brother of the late Louis 
Surette, Peter Surette, Rene 
Surette, and Elmer Surette. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Theda J. Finch, 84 



A funeral Mass for Theda 
J. (Streadwick) Finch, 84. of 
Quincy. formerly of 
Somerville, was celebrated 
Dec. 30 at Sacred Heart 
Church. Burial was in Blue- 
Hill Cemetery. Braintree. 

Mrs. Finch died Dec. 27 at 
Brockton Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

She was born and raised in 
Somerville and was a 
graduate of Somerville High 
School. 



.Mic livco 0/ ycdis III 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Frank 
Finch, she is survived by a 
son, Frank G. Finch of 
Whitman; and a grandson, 
Frank G. Finch Jr. of 
Whitman. She was the sister 
of the late P. Joseph 
Streadwick, .Stephen 

Streadwick, Marguerite 
Pacelli and Bernice White. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home. 785 Hancock .St. 



Red Cross Blood 
Drives Scheduled 



The following Quincy 
locations for Red Cross Blood 
Drives will be open to the 
public in January: 

Saturday, Jan. 13, 8:30 to 
1:30 p.m. at Masonic Temple. 
Hancock St.; Thursday. Jan. 



25, 2-5 p.m. at Eastern 
Nazarene College, Elm Ave.; 
and Monday, Jan. 29, 1-7 
p.m. at Quincy Point 

Congregational Church, 
Washington St. 



Carl Knudsen, 90 

World War I Veteran 



Mr. Bressler is survived by 
his wife, Hilda (Sagel) 
Bressler; a son, Stephen 
Bressler of Brookiine; a 
daughter, Miriam Kleiner of 
Brooklyn, N.Y.; a brother, 
William Bressler of Brook- 
line; two sisters, Sabine 
Schwaib of Manchester, 
Conn, and Berta Langer of 
Israel; and four grandchild- 
ren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Stanetsky Memorial 
Chapel, Brookiine. 

Donations may be made to 
Project Rofeh, 1710 Beacon 
St. Brookiine, 02146, or to 
Congregation Adas Shalom, 
435 Adams St. Quincy 01269 
or to Temple Beth Israel, 33 
Grafton St., Quincy 02169. 



A funeral service for Carl 
Knudsen, 90, of Quincy, was 
held Dec. 30 at the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 
Home, 26 Adams St. Burial 
was in Woodlawn Cemetery, 
Everett. Mr. Knudsen, a Navy 
veteran of World War I an 
honorary life member of the 
Town River Yacht Club, died 
Dec. 26 at the Hollywell 
Health Care Center in 
Randolph. 

Mr. Knudsen worked for 
the Thorn and Knudsen Co. 
for 50 years. 

He was a member of Faith 

Lutheran Church and the 
Houghs Neck American 
Legion Post. 



Mr. Knudsen was born and 
raised in East Boston. 

Husband of the late Helen 
S. (Johnson) Knudsen, he is 
survived by a son and 
daughter-in-law, Roger 
"Mike" Knudsen and Marion 
Knudsen of Quincy; four 
grandchildren, Michael R. 
Knudsen and Dennis J. 
Knudsen, both of Quincy, and 
Paul M. Knudsen and Steven 
Knudsen, both of Florida; 
and a great-grandchild, 
Stefanie Ann Knudsen of 
Florida. He was the brother of 
the late Anna Hobdell. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home. 



John J. Norton, 75 

Former State Inspector 



A funeral Mass for John 
Joseph Norton, 75, of Quincy, 
former chief state inspector of 
weights and measures and a 
community volunteer, will be 
celebrated today (Thursday) 
at 10 a.m. at St. Boniface 
Church. 

Mr. Norton died Sunday at 
the Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Brockton. 

He was active in the Quincy 
RSVP, the Retired Senior 
Volunteer Program, and 
Catholic Charities since his 
retirement in 1977. He spent 
much of his time visiting the 
elderly and handicapped to 
help with their daily activities. 

A member of the board of 
directors of Cerebral Palsy of 
the South Shore, he was 
recently honored for his 
contribution to the agency. 

An Army veteran of World 
War II, Mr. Norton was 
company commander to the 
918th Ordinance Group. *He 
saw action in Germany and 
fought in the Battle of the 
Bulge. After the war, he was a 
public safety officer in the 
military government in Bad 
Riechenhall. 

He remained active in the 
Army Reserves from 1946 to 
1968 and during the 1960s, he 
was an atomic weapons 
instructor at the command 
and general staff college at 
Fort Leavetiworth, Kan. He 

Elementary 

School Menu 



Jan. 8-12 

Mon: Italian Pizza with 
mozzarella & cheddar cheese, 
fruit juice, milk. 

lues: NO LUNCH 

Wed: Sloppy Joe on a roll, 
green beans, fruit cocktail, 
milk. 

Thurs: Turkey Fricassee, 
sweet potato, corn cranberry 
sauce, fresh baked wheat roll, 
milk. 

Fri: Curly Rotini macaroni 
with meatballs, fresh baked 
Italian roll, fruit cup, milk. 



Secondary 
School Menu 



Jan. 8-12 

Mon: Italian Pizza 
w/tomato sauce topping, 
green beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early Release Day 
Middle & High School - 
Grilled hot dog on a roll, 
Spanish style rice or baked 
beans, jello or fruit cup, milk. 

Wed: American chop suey, 
green peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, fresh apple, milk. 

Thurs: baked lasagne with 
meat sauce, green beans, fresh 
baked Italian roll. milk. 

Fri: Barbeque chicken, 
sweet potato, corn, fresh 
baked wheat roll. milk. 



retired a lieutenant colonel. 

Mr. Norton was a past 
commander of the George F. 
Bryan VFW Post. 

He served in the State 
Police for three years before 
and after World War II. 

He graduated summa cum 
laude from Suffolk University 
in 1955 and was past president 
and a member of the board of 
directors of the school's 

General Alumni Association. 

He was born in Boston. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Anna May (Baker) Norton; 
five daughters, Danea Clancy 
of South Weymouth, Judith 
Norton and Alice Booker, 
both of Quincy; Dorinda 
Leveque of Fall River, Joyce 
Burrows of Whitman and 
Susan Barilaro of Scituate; a 
brother, Thomas Norton of 
Dennis; two sisters, Irene 
Glynn of Centerville and 
Virginia Burns of Milton; and 
12 grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St., Quincy. 



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Tliursday, January 4. I WO Quincy Sun Pafe 13 

New Emergency 

Facility In Full 

Operation At QH 



A spacious and technol- 
ogically advanced new 
emergency medical facility 
recently began fullscale 
operation at Quincy Hospital. 

The new Emergency Room 
and Walk-In Center is a key 
part of the hospital's recently 
completed $60 million 
modernization project, which 
entailed the replacement of 
two thirds of the hospital's 
aging physical plant. 

With over 9,000 square feet 
of space, the new emergency 
care area is four times the size 
of the hospital's previous 
emergency facility. Fully 
equipped trauma facilities are 



just steps away from a main 
ambulance entrance. 

A full range of diagnostic 
technologies and specialized 
treatment areas are also key 
features of the new center. 
These include two radiology 
suites and specially equipped 
rooms for treatment of 
emergencies involving 
orthopedic, obstetrical, 
gynecological, eye and 
ear/ nose/ throat complica- 
tions. 

A separate walk-in 
entrance, triage and "rapid 
treatment" areas are provided 
for patients with minor health 
problems. 



Quincy Hospital, 
Osco Drugs Continue 
Cholesterol Screening 



The second in a series of 
community cholesterol 
screenings, cosponsored by 
Quincy Hospital and Osco 
Drugs, will take place 
Wednesday, Jan. 10 from 10 
a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Osco 
Drug Store, Granite St. 
Quincy. 

All screenings will be 
conducted by registered 
nurses, who will offer general 
information about nutrition 



and lifestyle issues affecting 
cholesterol levels. Referrals 
for further medical care will 
also be available. 

The cost of the screening is 
$5 per person. An individual 
screening takes approxi- 
mately five minutes. No 
appointment is necessary. 

Future screenings in 1990 
are being planned for 
February 14, March 14, April 
II, and May 9 at the same 
Osco Drug location. 



Quincy Animal League 
Election Meeting Jan. 21 

The Quincy Animal Newport Ave. North Quincy. 



League's annual meeting for 
election of officers will be held 
Sunday, Jan. 21 from 3 to 5 
p.m. at the meeting room of 
the Super Stop and Shop, 14 J 




Members and all friends of 
animals are invited to attend. 
Future League projects will be 
discussed. For more 
information call 479-8140. 



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Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 



t***^^***¥*****¥ 



Inaugural Ceremony Highlights 



¥-¥f*^¥¥-¥-¥^4-¥-^^^^^^^^ 





NEW MAV)it Raines A. Sheets shakes hands with a well-wisher after his inauguration 

Tuesday, ■'.il' , g 
, ''■ • ' 



(Quincy Sun phoio by Tom Gorman} 



MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL were sworn into two year terms Tuesday during the 
city's inauguration ceremonies for Mayor James A. Sheets. From left, Michael Cheney, Charles 
Phelan, Timothy Cahiil, Patricia Toland, Peter Kolson, Ted DeCristofaro, Lawrence Chretien 

and Thomas Nutley. . ^, , „. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charlet FloKifl 




WARD 2 COUNCILLOR Ted DeCristofaro, right, is sworn in as the new City Council 
President by City Clerk John Gillis. 

(Quincy Sun photo b>' Char lei Flufgt 

A New Mayor, New Era 



(Cont'd from Page I) 
rezone the city and then 
activate that process." 

• Create a Planning 
Review Board which will 
evaluate all proposed new 
development and determine 
its impact on city services 
including water, sewer, 
schools, drainage and traffic 
control. The board will 
consist of the planning 
director, building inspector, 
commissioner of Public 
Works, commissioner of 
Public Health, traffic 
engineer, mayor and City 
Council president or his 
designee. 

• File a lawsuit against the 
MWRA before Feb. 12 in an 
effort to stop the permanent 
sludge treatment facility at the 
former General Dynamics 
shipyard. 

"The City of Quincy is not 
going to be pushed around by 
the M WRA or any other state 
agency. We will control our 
own destiny," Sheets said. 

• Expand the city's 
"Adopt-an-lsland" program 
to an "Adopt-a-Park" 
program using funds from the 
private sector to help 
maintain, repair and expand 
the Quincy park system. 
Executive Secretary Tom 
Koch will implement the 
program which will become 
part of an overall beaut ifi- 
cation program 

• Continue the city's fight 
against Clean Harbors. 
Administrative Assistant 
Bernice Mader will head the 
Quincy Environmental Task 
Force which is the city's main 
mechanism in the fight 
against the firm which is 
proposing a hazardous waste 



incinerator near the Quincy- 
East Braintree line. 

• Continue the revitali- 
zation of downtown Quincy. 
including the construction of 
a new cultural center and 
expansion of- existing retail 
capabilities. Sheets said he 
intends to apply for federal 
grants immediately to fund 
these projects. 

The new mayor also said 
Quincy must continue to be a 
leader in public education. 
Noting educational chal- 
lenges of the 1990 "are 
enormous," he said, "We must 
craft improved learning 
environments, create exciting 
curriculum changes, find 
different ways of challenging 
young minds, build better 
relationships between 
educational institutions and 
business, and strengthen 
parent teacher ties creating 
more meaningful links 
between school and home." 

Sheets, who taught at 
Quincy Junior College for 26 
years, said he intends to 
become "deeply involved in 
all aspects of the educational 
process." 

Fiscally, Sheets said 
Quincy finds itself entering 
the 1990s at the "best and 
worst of times." 

He praised McCauley for 
his "sound economic 
planning, management and 
growth" over the past eight 
years. 

However, the new mayor 
said Quincy is "heir to the 
state's economic blundering 
and confusion and a 
philosophical malaise in 
which the most fundcmental 
values of our' people, namely 
the right to a sound public 



education and the right to be 
sale and secure in their person 
and property are in jeoparxly." 

Sheets pointed out that 
Quincy faces a $10 million 
shortfall this year due to a 
$3.2 million cut in state aid 
and the state's failure to 
provide an average $2 million 
increase in local aid as well as 
an unplanned $2 million hike 
in employee health insurance 
costs and spiraling MWRA 
assessments. 

"Fortunately, because of 
the frugal management in the 
McCauley administration, we 
are hopeful that our surplus of 
, free cash will cover this 
shortfall, and that we will end 
this fiscal year on June lOwith 
a balanced budget," Sheets 
said. 

Next year, the city faces a 
projected $13.5 million 
deficit. Explaining he will 
suggest sources of new 
revenue to the City Council 
very soon. Sheets added. "Wc 
must realize that even these 
new revenue streams may not 
be enough to cover the deficit 
and that budget cuts may be 
necessary." 

The new mayor stressed 
that the fiscal challenges 
ahead must be mei "together." 

"Our ability to work 
together, oor creative talents, 
our willingness to sacrifice, all 
will be tested constantly. Wc 
must not allow a budget crisis 
to become a crisis of the spirit; 
wc must now allow a revenue 
crisis to become a crisis of 
resolve. 

"We must not lose our 
confidence in each other nor 
our willingness to work 
together for a greater 
common good." 



PETER KOLSON, the new Ward 1 councillor, smiles during Tuesday's inauguration 
ceremonies. At left is Councillor Patricia Toland and at right, new Council President Ted 
DeCristofaro. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charles Flaunt 

Sheets 28th Man, 



James A. Sheets is the 2Sth 
man to hold the office of 
mayor of Quincy. 

But he is the 31st mayor 
because three chief executives. 
(Justave B. Bates, Charles A. 
Ross and Thomas S. Burgin. 
served split terms in office. 

There have also been three 
acting mayors since three men 
who were elected to the post 
filed to serve full terms. John 
L. Miller died in office and 
Ross and Burgin left office 
before their time was up. 

Here is a list of mayors and 
acting mayors of Quincy and 
the years in which they served: 



31st Mayor 



I. Charles H. Porter l«S9-9() 
1 Henr\' (). Fairbanks |«9l-93 

3. William A. Hodges 1894-95 

4. Charles F. Adams 1896-97 

5. Russell A. Sears 1898 

6. Harrison A. Keith 1899 

7. John O. Hall 1900-01 

8. Charles M. Bryant 1902-04 

9. James Thompson 1905-07 

10. William 1. Shea 1908-11 

I I. Eugene R. Stone 1912-13 

12. John I.. Miller 1914 
♦ Joseph L. Whiton 1914 

13. Chester I. Campbell 1915 

14. Gustave B. Bates 1916 

15. Joseph I.. Whiton 1917-20 
I6i William A. Bradford 1921-22 
*• Gustave B. Bates 1923-24 



I/. IVrlev r. ilaiOoui \^Z.<-~^' 
18. Iliomas J. Mc(Jrath 1927-^2 

19 Charles A. Ross 193.V35 
» Leo E. Mullin W^ 

20 Phomas S. Burgin 1935-42 
♦ William W. Jenness 1^42 
♦♦ Charles A. Ross 194.V49 
•♦ Thomas S. Burgin 1950- M 
21. David S. Mcintosh 1952-53 
22 Amelio Delia Chiesa 195465 

23. James R. Mclntyre 1966-71 

24. Walter J. Hannon 1972-75 

25. Joseph J. LaRaia 1976-77 

26. Arthur H. Tobin 1978-81 

27. Francis X. McCaulev 

I9S2-89 

28. James A. Sheets 1990- 
*denotcs Acting Mayor 

••Split Term 



Sheets Not A Minister 



In giving the benediction at 
the Inauguration ceremony of 
new Mayor James A. Sheets, 
the Rev. John J. MacMahon 
revealed an apparent secret 
about the city's new chief 
executive. 

Fr. MacMahon, retired 
pastor of St. Mary's Church 



in West Quincy. was telling a 
story and mentioned that 
Sheets is a minister. 

However, according to 
family members. Sheets is not 
a minister. 

The mayor did take a few 
theology courses while 
attending Eastern Nazarene 



College for his bachelors 
degree. However, Sheets" 
degree is in history and 
psychology. He was never a 
theology or divinity student. 
And in case you were 
wondering, the middle initial 
"A" in the new mayor's name 
stands for Andrew. 



Manley Chamber Breakfast Speaker Jan. 1 1 

*■ - ■"■" the South Shore Chamber of 

Commerce at 479-1 III. 



A "7:44 Breakfast" will be 
held by the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce on 
Thursday, Jan. II, at 
Lombardo's in Randolph, 

Richard Manley, president 
of Massachusetts Taxpayers 
Foundation, will be the guest 
speaker. 

Ticket cost for Chamber 



members is $10.; and fornon 
members, $13.50. Reserva- 
tions may be made by calline 




C::^ 



The first ship to cross the North Pole beneath the ice 
was the Nautilus on August 3. 1958. 



Thursday. January 4. 1990 Quincy Sun Page 15 



^^^********-¥****** 



Inaugural Ceremony Highlights 



^^^^^^#^^^^¥^«« 




MRS. JOANNE SHEETS, wife of the new mayor, listens as 
her husband delivers his Inaugural Address Tuesday. 

(Quincy Sun phino by Charlet Ftagg) FIVE MAYORS- New Mayor James A. Sheets, second from 

right, b joined by four former mayors after his inauguration 





Tuesday. From .left, Francis X. McCauley, Arthur Tobin, 
Waiter Hannon |md Joseph J. LaRaia. 

* (Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gormmn) 



MRS. PAULINE SHEETS, mother of new Mayor James A. 
Sheets, applauds after her son is sworn in. 

(Quincy Sun phtUo by C.harle% Fiagui 






THOMAS FABRIZIO, the new Ward 4 councillor, takes the RONALD MARIANO is sworn in as a new member of the 
oath of office. Quincy School Committee. 

(Quincy Sun pholo bv Tom Gorman) (Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman} 



^JSKKf^f^"' 








MARY JANE' POWERS lakes her oath as a new member of 
the Quincy School Committee. She succeeds the late 

Chrbtopher Kennedy. 

{Quincy Sun phitto by Tom Gormanf 



SHARING A MOMENT during Tuesday's Inauguration ceremonies are from left, Steve 
Tobin, his father, former Mayor and present Quincy Court Clerk Magbtrate Arthur Tobin, 
former Mayors Walter Hannon and Joseph LaRaia and Senator Paul Harold. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Chorlei Flagg) 



^ •_«' 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 



Realtors Adopt 

^Yes, You Can' 

(Buy A Home) Campaign 



Faced with months of 
negative reports on the 
condition of the real estate 
market, the Quincy, South 
Shore and Plymouth County 
Boards of Realtors have 
joined forces to promote the 
"Yes, You Can" (buy a 
home) theme. 

This multi-faceted cam- 
paign includes specific 
advertising targeted at first- 
time homebuyers and will 
begin in January with full 
page advertisements featuring 
homes priced under $150,000. 
Board officials indicate that 



there are ovr 1,000 homes, 
currently on the market on the 
South Shore, under $150,000. 

The "Yes, You Can" theme 
originated with the Spring- 
field Board of Realtors and 
has become so popular that 
Realtor Boards across the 
country have adopted it in an 
effort to restore the 
confidence of homebuyers 
and sellers. 

In addition to the 
advertising campaign, the two 
Boards will establish a 
coalition of allied industries 
to assist in providing the 



public with a more balanced 
view of the real estate market 
on the South Shore. 

Realtors firmly believe that 
there hasn't been a better time 
to buy; with interest rates 
dropping to single digits, a 
strong inventory, and 
motivated sellers, adding up 
to extremely favorable 
conditions for potential 
home buyers. 

Leadership of the two 
boards will utilize multi- 
media opportunities to get the 
message out to the public, 
including appearance on 
cable television and radio talk 
shows. 



Self-Employment And Mortgages 



The assumption that 
anyone who can afford a 
mortgage will get one is 
perhaps the one misunder- 
standing that leads to more 
wasted time and money than 
any other circumstance 
involving residential 
mortgages," said Carmine 
Lunetta. in an article about 
self-employed prospects in 
Real Estate Today, the 
official publication of the 
National Association of 
Realtors. 

Before beginning to look at 
properties, the homebuyer 
and the real estate agent 
should meet to discuss the 
facts about self-employment 
and mortgages. 

"The prospects may think 
they can afford the loan, but 
particular and definite 
qualifying rules may 
sometimes lead to an entirely 
different conclusion," says 
Lunetta, a former mortgage 
laon officer and real estate. 

"First," Lunetta advised 
sales agents, "you must 



determine which prospects 
are self-employed according 
to the rules of mortgage 
underwriting." This entails 
more than simply asking. 
"Most likely, they have no 
idea how the mortgage 
industry determines that, so 
their responses may not be 
correct," says Lunetta. 

Determining whether 
prospects receive a W-2 or 
1099 form for income tax 
purposes is generally a good 
test. "In almost all cases, 
those who receive a W-2 are 
employees, and those who 
receive a 1099 are self- 
employed," he says. 

This test, however, is not 
always conclusive, as in the 
case of individuals who 
receive a salary as employees 
of a small corporation and 
also own a certain percentage 
of that corporation's 
outstanding stock. Such 
ownership will cause 
mortgage underwriters to 
classify them as self- 
employed. 



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both residential and commercial 

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Mortgage underwriters 
have special rules for self- 
employed individuals 
applying for a loan. 

"Generally, for their self- 
employed income to be 
considered as qualifying 
income for mortgage 
underwriting purposes, self- 
employed prospects must 
have been self-employed in 
the same line of business for at 
least 24 months preceding the 
mortgage application," says 
Lunetta. 

"In addition," she 
continues, "most lenders want 
to determine not only that the 
prospects' income is sufficient 
to repay the mortgage loan 
but also that the business is a 
sufficiently viable entity and 
can reasonably be expected to 
continue to support the 
prospects' future obliga- 
tions." 

It is also important to know 
that not all income currently 
being earned by self- 
employed people can be used 
in a mortgage qualification 
calculation. The income of 



self-employed prospects is not 
what they're earning at the 
time of the application or even 
what they earned in the 
previous year. "Rather, it's 
the monthly average of the 
amount earned for the 24 
months immediately prece- 
ding the application." states 
Lunetta. 



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Average Price $183,689 

Mass. Real Estate Prices 

Remain Stable, Sales 

Return To Pre-Boom Levels 



The average price of all 
property sold in Massachu- 
setts rose to $183,689 during 
the third quarter of 1989. This 
is an increase of one percent 
over the average sales price 
recorded for the same period 
last year, according to figures 
compiled by the Massachu- 
setts Association of 
REALTORS (MAR). 

The data includes the sale 
of single-family homes and 
multi-family homes, com- 
mercial property, and raw 
land sold through REAL- 
TOR-affiliated multiple 
listing service (MLS) systems 
across the state. 

The $183,689 average sales 
price achieved during July, 
August, and September is up 
slightly from the 1988 third 
quarter average price of 
$181,283, and represents a 
modest three percent increase 
over the 1988 year-end 
average sales price of 
$175,975. 

"Although these latest 
numbers clearly indicate a 
change from the rapid 
appreciation rates of a few 
years ago. they nevertheless 
do show a small, but 
significant increase in 
property values," said MAR 
President Patricia Pingree, of 
Georgetown. 

"The fact that we have 
appreciation, instead of 
depreciation, in today's less 
active market is very 
encouraging and should 
^.demonstrate to prospective 
home buyers that housing 
remains a very sound, long- 
term investment." 

With selling prices expected 
to remain virtually unchanged 
during the final quarter of the 
year, the three percent 
appreciation rate projected 
for 1989 would represent the 
smallest annual increase in 
Massachusetts property 
prices since 1982 when prices 
increased onlv one-quarter of 



one percent. A three percent 
appreciation rate for the year 
would be healthy for the real 
estate industry however, 
suggested MAR President- 
elect J. Thomas Marquis, of 
Duxbury. 

"We had five consecutive 
years of double-digit price 
increases from 1982 through 
1987. and ahhough many 
people welcomed the equity 
growth hundreds of others 
were quickly priced out of the 
market. Moderate single-digit 
appreciation rates will allow 
homeowners to continue to 
build up their equity and 
provide expanded opportuni- 
ties for first-time home buyers 
to enter the market." he 
stated. 

In its report, the MAR also 
announced that sales of all 
property dropped nine 
percent during the third 
quarter compared with the 
same period last year. A total 
of 12.158 MLS sales were 
reported during the past 
quarter vs. 13.233 in the third 
quarter of 1988. 

"It is only reasonable to 
expect that there would fewer 
sales year." observed Pingree. 
"The record level of sales 
activity which occurred in the 
mid-eighties was unprelced- 
ented. and it simply would be 
unrealistic to believe that such 
a pace would last forever." 

"It is true the sales numbers 
may point to a slowdown in 
the housing market, but they 
do not by any means indicate 
a crisis. Instead they merely 
mark the return to a more 
normal market for the next 
few years." Pingree maintain- 
ed. 

In fact, the 1989 third 
quarter total of 12.158 sales is 
slightly higher than the 12.055 
sales reported in the second 
quarter of 1986 during the 
middle of the housing boom, 
and nearly 23 percent more 
than the 9.896 sales closed 



during the third quarter of 
1985. 

In addition, even based on a 
projected decline of 15 
percent in property sales 
during the last quarter of this 
year, 1989 still would be 
ranked as the fourth most 
active year for property sales 
in the state's history. 

"From a historical 
perspective, the third quarter 
sales figures remain very 
strong," Pingree said. 
"However, the current market 
will continue to be ruled by 
simple laws of supply and 
demand, as well as a general 
consumer wariness until the 
state's overall economy 
improves," she continued. 

The number of property 

listings through Realtor MLS 

Systems also dropped nearly 

10 percent from the second to 

the third quarter of this year, 

indicating that they may have 

peaked during the past spring. 

(The number of MLS listings 

[fell from an all-time high of 

i44.148 statewide during the 

second quarter to 39,951 in 

the third quarter. 

"There truly are many 
excellent opportunities 
available today for buyers in 
Massachusetts as a result of 
the high volume of inventory, 
stable price pattern, and 
recent drop in interest rates 
below ten percent. For these 
reasons, the key to 
successfully selling homes is 
setting a price which the 
current market will support" 
said Marquis. 

"Admittedly, sales will 
continue to be slow during the 
next several quarters, but 
predictably due to a 
correction occurring in the 
market. Absorption of the 
existing housing stock will 
take time, but properly priced 
homes particularly at the 
lower end of the market 
continue to sell very well." 



Paul Mollica Senior V.P. 
At Bank Of New England-South 



Bank of New England- 
South announces that Paul F. 
Mollica has been named 
Senior Vice President in its 
Commercial Loan Division. 



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w/cathedral ceiling & 
skylights. 6+ rooms, 3 
bedroom, 2 full bath 
Colonial. $179,900 
Squantum. Great oppor- 
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Colonial on 10.400 sq. ft. 
lot. Expansion possible. 
$199,900 

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"Paul Mollica has been an 
outstanding performer for 
this bank," noted BNE-South 
President Richard S. 
Strac/ynski. "His skills and 
experience ensure continued 
success in our Commercial 
loan area." 

A graduate of Stonehiil 



Quincy 

Quincy - seller will help 
with financing - business 
zoned single. 7 rooms 
$99,900 

Quincy - enjoy the cozy 
charm of a brick fireplace - 
one in each apt. - large 
open rooms - 2-3 bedrooms 
All this on a super side 
street in Wollaston 
$259,000 

Quincy - elegant and 
charming, newly listed 3 
bedroom contemporary 
Colonial. Massive skylighted 
family room with a view of 
the bay. Located on 
Presidents Hill - Call for 
personal tour $349,900 
Check out our other 
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Wollaaton 

472-4330 



College with a degree in 
Economics, Mollica holds an 
M.B.A. from Suffolk 
University. He was hired in 
1979 by the fonner Hancock 
Bank before it merged with 
Bank of New England. In July 
of 1989, he was named 
Commercial Banking Re- 
gional Manager for the 
Quincy region. 

Robert Leary 
Promoted 
At Shawmut 

Robert J. Leary Jr. of 
Quincy has been promoted 
from commercial loan officer 
to assistant vice president of 
commercial lending at 
Shawmut Bank. N.A. 

Leary is responsible for 
providing credit and 
corporate banking services to 
middle market companies on 
the South Shore. He has been 



assigned to Shawmut's 1150 
Hancock St. office in Quinc;^. 
Leary joined Shawmut last 
April, Previously, he spent six 
and a half years with United 
States Trust Company where 
he served as a commercial 
loan officer. 



Thursday, January 4. 1990 Quincy Sun Page 17 



• Hockey 

Raiders Win 
Streak Snapped 

By Somerville 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

After skating past five 
straight Greater Boston 
League opponents and 
scoring 42 goals in the 
process, the North Quincy 
hockey bowed to Somerville, 
2-1, last Saturday, dropping 
its record to 5-1. 

The Raiders, under first- 
year coach Dave Peters, 
finished their schedule against 
GBL opponents last night 
(Wednesday) at Arlington 
against the top GBL team and 
annually one of the state's 
leading teams. They open 
their Suburban League 
schedule Saturday against 
Quincy at 6:40 at the Youth 
Arena and will be at Waltham 
next Wednesday night. 

"Somerville played 
outstanding defense and we 
had very few shots in the first 
two periods," said Peters. 
"We had some good chances 
in the last period but couldn't 
capitalize. I think they have a 
better team than Medford and 
are right behind Arlington." 



Somerville scored a goal in 
each of the first two periods 
and with 1 2 minutes left in the 
game Brian Zimmerman 
scored North's goal with Joe 
Fasano assisting. 

"It was a good break for us 
when Pat O'Donoghue gave 
up basketball to play hockey," 
Peters said. "He has done a 
great job in every game and 
gives us a top notch goalie. 

"With him in goal, a solid 
defense and one of the best 
lines around in Zimmerman, 
Fasano and Sal Manganaro, I 
think we will do all right in the 
league." 

Earlier in the week North 
Quincy scored six goals in the 
first period and rolled over 
Revere, 10-3. Manganaro had 
a hat trick and four assists, 
giving him 15 goals and eight 
assists in five games. 

Fasano had a hat trick and 
an assist, Zimmerman two 
goals and four assists, Mike 
DesRoche and Mike 
Christopherson a goal each 
and Jamie Tapper two assists. 



Quincy Loses 



The Quincy hockey team 
turned in one of its best 
offensive performances of the 
season last week but it wasn't 
enough as Somerville handed 
the Presidents their fourth 
straight loss, 7-to-5. 

Quincy dropped to 0-4-1. 

Quincy played Everett last 
night (Wednesday), will open 
its Suburban League schedule 
against North Quincy 
Saturday at 6:40 at the Youth 
Arena and will host Brockton 
next Wednesday at 5:30 at the 
Youth Arena. 

Scott Curtin scored two 



goals in the third period 
against Somerville but the 
Presidents couldn't overcome 
Somerville's big lead. 

Scott MacPherson, Shane 
Abboud and Mark Gilmore 
also scored for Quincy. John 
Ksich had a hat trick for 
Somerville. 

"We just can't put 
everything together," said 
Quincy coach Bob Sylvia. 
"We are very young (seven 
freshmen and five sophomores) 
and the boys are hustling all 
the time. We should improve 
as the season goes along." 



B.C. High Basketball 

Team Has Strong 

Quincy Connection 



The 1989-90 boys basket- 
ball team at Boston College 
High has a Quincy connection 
this year as the Eagles are off 
to a 2-1 start. 

Senior guard Peter 
McLoughlin of Quincy, also a 
co-captain, leads the team in 
scoring averaging 20 points a 
game. Senior center John 
Shea of Quincy, has 
dominated the boards 
averaging 16 rebounds along 
with 10 points a game while 
guard/ forward Jamie Green, 
also of Quincy, is shooting 
100 percent from the free 
throw line in his first 3 games. 

B.C. High head coach 



Brian Buckley and assistant 
coach Bob Evans, both in 
their first year at B.C. High, 
are also from Quincy. Evans, 
who coached at Archbishop 
Williams for the past 7 years, 
has his junior varsity team off 
to a good start also winning 2 
of 3 games. 

The Eagles, who lost their 
opener to powerful Durfee 6 1 - 
57, came back to defeat 
Cumberland, R.L and Xavier 
of N.Y. 

According to Buckley, the 
Durfee loss helped the team. 
"After the Durfee game our 
young players believed in 
their abilities," Buckley 
noted. 



Sharp Shooters 



I 



>oos 




HERE IT COMES ~ Danny Kane tries a one-hand throw 
during the city's championship of the Elks National "Hoop 
Shoot" Free-Throw Contest at the Merrymount School. 

(Quincy Sun photo* by Tom Gorman) 



JUMPER - Justin Cram lets one fly at the Merrymount 
School gym during the Elks National "Hoop Shoot" Free 
Throw Contest. School children from all over the city 
participated in the contest co-sponsored by the Quincy 
Recreation Department and Quincy Lodge of Elks. 



Sun Sports 



Quincy Wrestlers Pin Norwood 



The Quincy wrestling team 
improved to 6-1 last week 
with a 41-27 victory over 
Norwood. 

Quincy's winners were 
Dave Cahill, who won by pin 



in the 103-pound class; Matt 
Fratolillo, who won, 14-12, at 
112; Al Souza, winner, 17-1, 
at 135; Brian Gannon, winner 
by pin at 140; Ally Sleiman, 
winner by pin at 152; Matt 



Gallahue, winner by forfeit at 
160; Joe DiStasio, winner by 

pin at 171, and Brian Burgess, 

winner, 5-3, at 189. 
Gannon and Burgess each 

improved to 6-1 with their 



victories. 

Losers were Marc Lomanno 
at 119, Ben Radchffe at 125, 
Tom Fratolillo at 130, Dean 
Morris at 145, and Rich 
Buckley in the heavyweight 
class. 



North Quincy Runners Shine 



Several North Quincy 
runners came up with 
outstanding performances in 
track meets over the 
Christmas vacation. 

At the Boston College 
Holiday Classic, Sherrin 
Quintiliani showed signs of 
coming back from a knee 
injury which shortened her 
cross country season with a 
strong second place in the 
two-mile. Her time of 12:29.3 
qualifies her for the state 
championships in February. 
She also has qualified in the 



mile. 

"She's only doing light 
running 15-20 minutes a day 
so this is a promising sign," 
said coach Jeff Hennessy. 
"The B.C. track is not as fast 
as Harvard or B.U." 

Also qualifying for the 

states were sprinters Wayne 

Sit and Hiep Ngo. Sit did 6.8 

. in the 55-meters and Hiep 6.9. 

At the Age Group 
Development Meet at Brown, 
Jennifer Nutley, a freshman, 
qualified for the states with a 
7.93 in the 55-meters. Also 



turning in a tme performance 
was liana Cobban, winning 
the 800-meters in 2:39.8. 

At the Brown Inter- 
scholastics held in the new 
Olney Margolies facility in 
Providence, North's entry in 
the girls' freshman- 
sophomore distance medley 
came from behind to win over 
top-ranked Tilden High of 
New Jersey. Leadoff runner 
Cindy Walsh kept things close 
with a fine 4:25.8 for 1200 
meters and Jennifer Nutley 
ran the 400-meter leg in 70.7. 



By the time liana Cobban had 
finished her 800 meters in 
2:46.7, Tilden had built a 100- 
meter lead over the 
Raiderettes. However, 
Suzanne Lewis, running the 
mile anchor leg, chipped away 
slowly with consistent laps, 
reaching the Tilden runner 
with 400 meters to go and 
finishing in an outstanding 
5:47.7. The total time for 
North was 14:10.4. 

Each girl received a medal 
and the school received an 
engraved trophy. There were 
18 schools in the race. 



Baseball Umpires School Starts Jan. 24 



Those interested in 
becoming baseball umpires 
and those umpires wishing tc 
improve their skills can enroll 
in the Massachusetts Bay 
Umpires School at UMass/ 
Boston, starting Jan. 24. 



The school will continue for 
10 successive Wednesdays at 7 
p.m. and will conclude on 
March 28. 

At the conclusion of the 
school the students will take 
the state umpire exam and 



those who pass the exam will 
become an approved, certified 
umpire and eligible to receive 
game assignments. Their 
names will be forwarded to 
various commissioners for 
consideration. 



FOOTBALL 

BASEBALL 

HOCKEY 

SOCCER 

CAMPING 
Canton Hanover 



The cost for the course, T- 
shirt, cap, handouts and 
materials is $120. Those 
wishing applications should 
contact Tom Stevenson, 36 
Kristin Road, Plymouth 
02360, telephone (508)747- 
,5585. 



Page IS Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 



Pee Wee Bs 
Lose In K. Of C. Finals 



Ouincy's Pee Wee B team 
advanced the finals of the 
annual North Quincy K. of C. 
hockey tournament at the 
Youth Arena before losing to 
Framingham. 6-3. in the 
championship game. 

Quincy opened with a 5-1 
win over Hanover as Ron 
McGann had a hat trick ^nd 
Steve Barrett and Robbie 
Callow a goal each. A.J. 
Carthas had four assists, 
Barrett three and McGann 
and Chris Grant one each. 

Quincy edged Milton, 3-2, 
on goals by Brendan O'Brien, 
R.J. DiMattia and Grant. 



Dan Mann, McGann, Steve 
King, O'Brien and Callow had 
assists. 

Quincy was edged by 
Hingham, 2-1, with Barrett 
scoring the goal and Carthas 
and McGann assisting. 

In a rematch with 
Hingham, Quincy won, 3-0, 
with McGann, Carthas and 
King scoring the goals and 
DiMattia, Jay Fennelley. 
McGann and Barrett having 
assists. 

In the championship game 
O'Briei' had two goals and 
Carthas one. Callow, Grant, 
Mann and Barrett had assists. 



Quincy's Squirt B team 
went to the semifinals before 
bowing to South Boston, 6-3. 

Quincy edged Everett, 5-4; 
Weymouth, 3-2, and 
Brockton, 4-2. 

Quincy's Mite team edged 
the Flyers, 1-0, and lost to the 
Seahawks, 5-4, in double 
overtime. 

The tournament featured a 
record-breaking game 
between the South Boston 
and Medford Mites, which 
went 10 overtimes before the 
teams tied, 3-3, and were 
declared co-champions. 



Woodward School 
In Celtics-Easter Seal 



Students at the Woodward 



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773-4956 



Shoot-Out 

School in Quincy are shooting 
baskets to raise money for 
people with disabilities in the 
Boston Celtics-Easter Seal 
Basketball Shoot-Out during 
the week of January 8. 

Celtics star Kevin McHale 
is honorary chairman of the 
event, sponsored annually by 
the TJX Companies, Inc. The 
program teaches youngsters 



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about disabilities— then gives 
them a chance to help. 

Students participating in 
the shoot-out sink as many 
baskets as they can during a 
three-minute period in the 
school gym. Each basket 
earns money pledged by 
family and friends. The 
money funds Easter Seal 
services for people with 
disabilities. 

The top basketball shoot- 
out fundraisers will receive 
autographed Celtics basket- 
balls from McHale at a 
Boston Celtics game in 
March. Winners also receive 
Celtics T-shirts and Converse 
athletic shoes and bags. 

Last year more than 4,000 
students throughout 
Massachusetts raised 
$150,000 in Basketball Shoot- 
Outs. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
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Telephone: 471-3100 



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THE MEW YEAR! 

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New Year's resolution. Win the Stanley Cup! In January the Bs 

take on Adams Division rivals Hartford and Quebec, and the 
Stanley Cup Champion Calgary Flames. NESN delivers each of 

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Squirt As Win Tourney 



Quincy's Squirt A hockey 
team, sponsored by South 
Boston Savings Bank, won 
the Prancer Division of the 
Santa Claus Tournament at 
Hingham, defeating Weymouth, 
5-0, and Taunton, 6-3, and 
playing two triple-overtime 
games against Brockton and 
West Bay Islanders. 

Scott Cooper had four 
goals in the tournament, Billy 



Barron, John Manning, Tom 
Sullivan and Tim Wood two 
apiece and Paul Princiotti and 
John Ryan one each. Eric 
Wood and Robbie Pirelli had 
four assists each, Barron and 
Cooper three apiece. 
Manning and Dan Hughes 
two each and Joe Bracken, 
Mike O'Brien, Princiotto, 
Dan Stone, Matt Jarnis. Tim 
Wood and Sullivan one each. 



Tim Sheehan was outstanding 
in goal with a 1. 5 goals against 
average. 

In a Greater Boston League 
game the Squirt A's tied 
Belmont, leaving them one 
point out of first place. 

Manning and Pirelli had 
the goals and Eric Wood, 
Sullivan and Jarnis had 
assists. 



Squirt House 

Barron's Hat Trick 
Propels Johnson To Top 



Johnson Motor Parts 
moved into first place in the 
Squirt House League by 
defeating Doran & Horrigan, 
5-3. 

Bill Barron had a hat trick 
and Ryan Prada and Matt 
Langille a goal each while Tim 
Hunter had two assists and 
Pat Coughlin, Langille, 
Jimmy Hasson and Danny 



Stone one each. A.J. Quinn 
had two goals and Mike Ryan 
one for Doran and Mark 
Belanger had two assists. 

Burgin Plainer walloped 
the Quincy Sun, 9-3, as 
Tommy Sullivan and Robbie 
Winter had hat tricks, Mike 
Balducci two goals and Joe 
Bracken one. Mike Martin, 
Timmy Sheehan and Danny 



Hughes had two assists each. 
Dan O'Donnell, John 
Manning and Jeff Spear 
scored for the Sun. Jeff 
Coleman had two assists and 
Eric Wood one. 

The standings: Johnson 
Motor Parts, 7-4-0; Quincy 
Sun, 5-3-3; Doran & 
Horrigan, 5-3-3; Burgin 
Platern, 2-9-0. 



Colonial Cuts UCT's Lead 



UCPs lead in the Pee Wee 
House League was cut to one 
point as it was held to a 5-5 tie 
by Colonial Federal. 

Sean Mac Donald and Lee 
Hughes had two goals each 
and Billy Coughlin one for 
UCT, while Coughlin had two 
assists and Jamie Murphy, 
Chris McArdle, Hughes and 



A.J. Carthas one each. Dan 
Beaton scored twice and Eric 
Griffin, John Hasson and Jeff 
Earnest once each for 
Colonial Federal. Steve 
Provost and Joe McPhee had 
two assists apiece and J.J. 
Borden and Hasson one each. 

Bersani Brothers edged 
Keohane's 3-2, on goals by 



Jay Evans, Chris Grant and 
Jason Healy. Pat Connolly, 
Jamie Boire and Ken Burke 
had assists. Robbie Callow 
and Eric Oliva scored for 
Keohane's with two assists for 
Dennis Pateras. 

The standings: UCT, 4-2-5; 
Bersani, 4-3-4; Colonial 
Federal, 4-5-2; Keohane's, 4- 
6-1. 



Balducci's Edges Lydon-Russell 



Balducci's edged Lydon- 
Russell, 3-2, in Mite House 
League action. 

„|»aul Markarian, Jesse 
Winter and Shane Kabilian 
had the goals and Markarian 
and Jeff Brophy had assists. 
Jeff Glynn and John Barron 



scored for Lydon. 

Rogan Hennessy squeezed 
by Purdy's Ice Cream, 2-1, on 
two goals by Sean Haidul. 
Ryan Murray had an assist, 
Chris Cullen scored for 
Purdy's and Shawn Manning 
assisted. 



John Wall and Nick 
Pizziferri scored two goals 
apiece as the Paul Harold 
Club topped Newcomb 
Farms, 4-2. Matt O'Donnell. 
Steve Goff and Pizziferri had 
assists. Kristyn Stenberg 
scored for Newcomb and 
Shawn Mannig had an assist. 



,■****'» ■*'^**^'«^'*'t*^*****^******^*^*'^^^****'*^^^^*^^^*»^\: 



MICHAEL 



P A L I N 




^k Rule Number One: 

2 The Python 



r^n-iV^ 



V/C4^X 


*- ^/'.^gfe. 




^SB^B' 


Rule 


Ai<<E Premiere 


Number Two: 


presents 


He must 
make it 
around 
the world 
m 80 days. 


Around the world 
In 80 Days 




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Thursday. January 4, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Basketball 



Raiders Lose 
In Tourney Final 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team lost a 12- 
point haiftime lead and 
bowed to Weymouth North, 
71-62, in the finals of the 
annual Christmas tourna- 
ment hosted this year by the 
Raiders. 

Ted Stevenson's North 
team fell to 2-4, two of its 
previous losses being by two 
point and the other by three. 
The Raiders opened their 
Suburban League season last 
night (Wednesday) against 
perennial league champion 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
and will host Quincy next 
Tuesday night at 7:30. 

North, which edged 
Weymouth South, 67-66, in 
the opening round, had 



second half troubles in both 
games just as it has all season. 
"We've had trouble in the 
second half all season," 
Stevenson said. "It's been a 
definite pattern. We could 
easily have won all our 
previous three games but 
found all kinds of ways to 
lose." 

The Raiders held a 25-14 
lead after a quarter and still 
led, 42-30, at haiftime. 
Weymouth came back strong 
and out-scored North, 19-6, in 
the third quarter to take a 49- 
48 lead. The Maroons built on 
that lead in the final session. 

Erik DeBoer, who earned 
the plaudits of Weymouth 
coach Steve Shoff, again led 
North Quincy offensively 



with 21 points, including three 
three-point shots and Dan 
McLean had 12. 

North got off to a fast start 
against Weymouth South in 
the opening round but again 
had second half troubles and 
had to hang on for dear Ufe as 
Brian Curran hit two free 
throws with six seconds left to 
give North the one-point win. 

"We just hung on," said 
Stevenson. "We played a 
great first half and Weymouth 
played a great second half. 

DeBoer scored 20 points 
and took down 14 rebounds, 
Angelo Kyranis had 13 
points, Curran had 12 and 
was five for six from the free 
throw line in the fourth 
quarter, and freshman Sean 
Donovan added 1 1 points. 

--TOM SULLIVAN 



Presidents Bow 
Twice In Tourney 



The Quincy boys' basket- 
ball team turned in two of its 
best efforts of the season in 
the annual Christmas 
Tournament at North Quincy 
but the Presidents lost both 
games to Weymouth North 
and Weymouth South to drop 
to 0-6 on the season. 

John Franceschini's 
Quincy team bowed to 
Weymouth North, the 
tourney champion, 60-55, in 
the opener and lost to 
Weymouth South, 55-50, in 
the consolation game. 

The Presidents opened 
their Suburban League 

Youth Fitness 
Program 

The South Shore YMCA 
Youth Fitness and Nutrition 
Program will begin its winter 
session Tuesday, Jan. 9. 

The 10 week program is 
designed for boys and girls 
age 9 to 13. 

The program includes 
supervised strength training 
on Nautilus equipment, 
supervised endurance training 
on computerized biocycles, 
weekly slide presentations, 
and fitness related discussion 
sessions, plus before and after 
blood cholesterol checks and 
body composition assess- 
ments. 

The goal of the program is 
to encourage young people to 
form lifetime fitness and 
nutrition habits. __^__ 



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A.E.GOODHUESCO.INC. 
13 School St. 
Quincy 
472-3090 



season last night (Wednesday) 
at league powerhouse 
Brockton, will host Cam- 
bridge Rindge and Latin 
Friday night at 7:30 and will 
play at North Quincy next 
Tuesday night at 7:30. 

The luckess Quincy team 
stayed with Weymouth South 
all the way as the teams were 
tied at 1 1 after the first quarter 
and Weymouth led by three 
going into the last quarter 
when it dominated the 
offensive boards to take the 
win. 

During Ihe last quarter 
South's Todd Cusick had 
three offensive rebounds 
resulting in five points and 
Chuck Gibbs grabbed three 
for six more points. During 



the game South out- 
rebounded the Presidents, 29- 
15. 

Joe Russell, who led the 
league in three-point 
percentage last year, had 17 
points incuding three three- 
pointers, and E.J. Nordstrom 
added 12 points. 

In the opener against 
Weymouth North, Quincy 
made a fine second half 
comeback after falling 
behind, 38-20. at the half. 

The Presidents came back 
strong in the last two quarters 
as Nordstrom had 20 pints 
and Russell added 10. Quincy 
outscored the Maroons, 17-7, 
in the third quarter and trailed 
45-37 going into the final 
sesson. 



COlMAAir 



Sports 
Stumpers 

Sports Quiz 

by Larry Duncan 



L Who is the only manager in the history of baseball to 
sign 24 separate one-year contracts? 

2. Name the last team (excluding the 1989 Oakland A's) 
to win a World Series in four straight games. 

3. What hockey team is nicknamed the "Habs?" 

4. What basketball player was nicknamed "Tiny?" 

5. Prior to coaching at the University of Miami, what 
college football team was current Dallas Cowboy Jimmy 
Johnson a head coach for? 

6. Name the only two coaches to lose four Super Bowl 
games. 

7. Prior to 1989, who was the last coach to lead the 
Green Bay Packers in playoff competition? 

8. Who was the kicker for the New York Jets in Super 
Bowl 111? 

9. What was the original name of the Houston Astros? 

10. Name three baseball teams Larry Parrish played for 
during his career. 



Sports Quiz Answers 



1. Walter Alston of the Los Angeles Dodgers; 2. The 
Cincinnati Reds beat the Yankees 4-0 in 1976; 3. The 
Montreal Canadians; 4. Nate Archibald; 5. Oklahoma State; 
6. Bud Grant of the Minnesota Vikings (0-4) and Don Shula 
with Baltimore (0-1) and Miami (2-3); 7. Dan Devine; 8. 
Jim Turner; 9. Colt 45's; 10. Montreal, Texas and Boston 

© 1990 by King Features .Synd. 

COLMAN'S SPORTING GOODS 

I ne Highl Answer hor 
All Your Sporting Needs. 




MRS. RACHEL ROBINSON, widow of baseball legend Jackie Robinson, leads a group of 
Quincy Central Middle School students on a tour of the "Jackie Robinson: An American 
Journey" exhibit at Boston's International Place. Mary Schiess of the Quincy Central Middle 
School and her group of sixth-graders were the first class in the state to see the exhibit. It 
chronicles the life of baseball hero and civil rights leader Jackie Robinson in commemoration of 
his entry into major league baseball as its first black player. 

North Girls Top 
Quincy In Tourney 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team, after losing 
to Weymouth South, 44-36, in 
the opening round, came back 
to defeat Quincy, 53-47, in the 
consolation game of the 
Christmas tournament at 
Weymouth South to improve 
its record to 4-2. 

The Quincy girls, playing 
one of their best games 
against North and leading 
most of the way, had dropped 
their opener to Weymouth 
North, 45-39. The First 
Ladies dropped to 1-5. 

Both teams opened their 
Suburban League schedules 
last night (Wednesday) North 
playing Cambridge Rindge 



and Laun ana (^uuicy mccuii 
and Latin and Quincy 
meeting Brockton. Quincy 
will play at Cambridge 
Friday at 3:30 and will play at 
North Quincy next Tuesday 
at 6 p.m. 

In the consolation win over 
Quincy, Christine Sahon led 
the North girls with 17 ponts 
the North girls with 17 points 
and Joanna Hugnetta added 
13. 

Amy Baker led the First 
Ladies with 14 points and 
Chris Barrett, playing with a 
broken finger, had 12. 

In the opening round 
Weymouth South's Amy 
Toland had 1 1 points and 
took down an amazing 23 



rebounds to lead the way over 
North Quincy. 

For the North girls Tara 
Miles scored 1 1 points, 
including three three- 
pointers, and Kerry Tolson 
had seven. 

Quincy trailed Weymouth 
North, 24-17, at haiftime. 
Barrett scored 12 pints and 
Baker nine. Sue Mathison 
had a big night for Weymouth 
with 15 points and 12 
rebounds. 

NEWSCARRIERS 
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Telephone: 471-3100 




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P«fe 20 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 4, 1990 



Vermette On 
Bridgewater 
Swim Team 

Joanna Vermette of North 
Quincy is a member of the 
Bridgewater State College 
Women's Swimming Team 
coached by kristen Legere. 
She is competing in the 
freestyle events. 

Vermette, a freshman, 
graduated from North Quincy 
High where she stood out in 
swimming. 

She is the daughter of 
Gilbert and Mary Vermette. 




Lincoln-Hancock 5th 
Grades Decorate Spoons 
For Needy Children 



Students in Steven 
Cantelli's fifth grade class at 
Lincoln-Hancock Community 
School are helping to feed 
needy children this holiday 
season by decorating spoons 
for Santa's Kitchen. 

The spoons, which are 
being given to the public in 
return for a donation, will be 
collected at Faneuil Hall 
Marketplace and be displayed 
at Filene's Basement stores 
throughout the holiday 
season. 

The fundraiser is sponsored 
by Project Bread and Walk 
for Hunger, WHDH and 
Filene's Basement. 

The class is also holding a 
peanut butter and jelly drive 
to help the Southwest 
Community Action Center 
distribute food to the needy. 



JANUARY 6 & 10 - 8 P.M. 



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NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



HOT PROGRAMS FOR 
COID WINTER NKHIS. 




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When the chill of Old Man Winter starts to get under your specials, championship boxing and wonderful family pro- 
skin, snuggle up with the hottest movies around. They'reon gramming. And when you odd Gnemax,you1l get the 
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Continental Cablevision 

We put everything on the line for you. 




LINCOLN-HANCOCK Community school fifth graders of 
Steven Cantelli's class display the spoons they decorated for 
Santa's Kitchen. Kneeling, from left, Kelly Aufiero, Michael 
Russo and Kristina DeLisle. Standing, Ronald Cinquegrano, 
Michael Balducci and Nichole Santoro. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Joseph Grasso Completes 
Army Basic Training 



Pvt. Joseph C. Grasso, son 
of Margaret F. Holiand of 
Quincy, has completed basic 
training at Fort Jackson, S.C. 

During training, students 
received instruction in drill 
and ceremonies, weapons. 




map reading, tactics, military 
courtesy, military justice, first 
aid and Army history and 
traditions. 

Grasso is a 1 983 graduate of 
Mount Whitney High School, 
Visalia, Calif. 



I'l^orr^as 

Public^ 
Library 




Following is a list of new adult and children's 
books and musical recordings available at the 
Thomas Crane Public Library: 

Fiction: Anastasia Syndrome and other stories by 
Mary Higgins Clark. Simon and Schuster, 1989. 
Busybodies by Patrick Anderson. Simon and Schuster, 
CI989. Caribbean by James A. Michener. Random 
House, cl989. Enemy Territory by Douglas Terman. 
Bantam Books, cl989. Man Who Heart Too Much by 
Bill Granger. Warner Books, cl989. 

Non-Fiction: Blood Warning; the true story of the 
New Orleans slasher by John Dillman. G.P. Putnam's 
Sons, cl989. *364.I523 D58B. Diseasing Of America; 
addiction treatment out of control by Stanton Peele. 
Lexington Books, cl989. *362.29 PEE. If This Was 
Happiness; a biography of Rita Hayworth by Barbara 
Leaming. Viking, cl989. ♦791.43 H336L. Without 
Consent Or Contract; the rise and fall of American 
slavery by Robert W. Fogel. W.W. Norton. cl989. 
•306.362 WIT. Yours, Mine and Ours; how families 
change by Anne C. Bernstein. Charles Scribner's Sons, 
C1989. •306.87 B45. 

Cliildren*s Books: Anno's Aesop by Mitsumasa 
Anno. Orchard, 1989. 'J 398.2 AN78. Dancing Teepees: 
poems of American Indians by Virginia Driving Hawk 
Sneve. Holiday House. 1989. J 897D196. Ghastly 
Goops and Pincushions by X.J. Kennedy. Athcneum, 
1989. •J 818 K38. Has Anyone Here Seen William? by 
bob Graham. Little, Brown, 1989. JE Fiction. This Old 
Man; the counting song by Robin Koontz. Dodd. 1989. 
JE Fiction. 

Musical Recordings: Sousa. Stars and Stripes 
Forever. 14 marches. CD R785.I3 S085A. Schubert. 
"Trout Quintet," piano and strings. CD "785.75 SCH 
78A. 

•Dewey (location) number. 

Compiled by Jane Granstrom, Charles Rathclement 
and Kathleen McCormick. 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




Operation Identification 

Is Free 

Have You Joined? 

Q. What is Operation Identification? 

A. Operation Identification is a program to 
discourage theft and burglary by identification of 
valuables and advising potential thieves this action has 
been taken by placing stickers on your doors. 

Q. How is this accomplished? 

A. By engraving your drivers license number on any 
article of value that can be carried from your home. 

Q. Why does this aprogram discourage theft? 

A. The use of the decals on the doors serve as notice to 
potential thieves that items of value have been marked 
with an identification number. If the items are stolen 
they could be used as direct evidence against the thief 
when found in his/her possession. Marking your 
valuables also makes it difficult for thieves to sell or 
trade your valuables. 

Q. What items should be marked? 

A. TV sets, radios, VCR's, tape recorders, stereos, 
hub caps, bicycles, typewriters, computers, office 
equipment, or any item of value that will not be defaced 
by engraving your ID number. Jewelry is best 
photographed and appraised by a reputable appraiser. 
Once your property is engraved you should keep a 
record of it on an Operation ID inventory sheet. Photos 
of valuables and inventory sheets should be kept in a 
safe deposit bo.x awa\ from the home in case of fire. 

Q. What does this cost me? 

A. Nothing, but a little of your time. 

Q. Has this program really worked to prevent crime? 

A. There is con\incing evidence that burglars avoid 
both homes and neighborhoods where Operation ID is 
in force. 

Q. How do I get the engraver and stickers? 

A. Call the Quincy Police Crime Prevention Unit at 
479-1212 ext. 1 17. The engraver will be loaned to you 
and the decals for your doors and windows will be given 
to you when you return the engraver. 

Police Log Hot Spots 

Monday, Dec. IS: 
11 a.m., Possible explosive device, 79 Brooks Ave. 
Caller reports item resembling an explosive device 
found. 775 Off. Costa. 770 Sgt. Buckley dispatched. 
Boston P.D. bomb squad notified. Device turned out to 
be hoax. 

1:49 pm, break, 37 Littlefield St. Under investigation. 
11:17 pm, break, 26 James St. Under investigation. 

Tuesday, Dec. 26: 
7:13 am, M/V break, 290 Quarry St. Caller reports that 
approximately $1200 worth of tools were stolen from a 
1988 van. 

10:06 pm, break, 156 Newbury Ave. Under 
investigation. 

Wednesday, Dec. 27: 
5:40 am, break, 38 Silver St. A TV and VCR were 
stolen. 

M6 am, break, 98 Cross St. Under investigation. 
11:49 am, break, 48 1 Quincy Ave. Under investigation. 
1:33 pm, break, 82 Crescent St. Under investigation. 

Thursday, Dec. 28: 
8:17 am, break, Isabella St. Under Investigation. 

Friday, Dec. 29: 
7:47 am, M/V break, 140 Quincy Shore Dr. Caller 
reports a 1986 Nissan broken into. Hub caps stolen, 
ignition damaged. 

Saturday, Dec. 30: 
8:43 am, break, 184 Washington St. Under 
investigation. 

Sunday, Dec. 31: 
3:20 pm, M/V Breaks, 290 Quarry St. A total of four 
vehicles broken into since midnight. 

Services for week: 911 Calls-717; Wagon Runs-34; 
Vehicles Towed-37. 

If you have an\ information on an\ ol the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy f'olice 
Detective bureau at 479-1212 ext. 313. You will not be 
required to idcntil\ Noursclf. but it could help. 



NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn extra money by 

building a Quincy Sun home delivery 

route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




Thursday. January 4, 1990 Quincy .Sun Paj* 21 

Lien Ho 

Wins Baybank 
Recognition 



Lien Ho of Quincy was 
recently named a "Most 
Valuable Baybanker" as part 
of Baybanks' 1989 sales 
recognition program, "The 
Legend Continues." 

As an MVB, Ho will be sent 
to Delta Airlines' head- 
quarters in Atlanta, Ga., to 
observe sales operations. 

A sales and service 
representative at Baybank's 
South Braintree office, she 
was one of 44 MVB's selected 
from more than 1,800 branch 
staff members company wide. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



MOBILE 



SERVICE 



AMONG THE INVITED GUESTS at Tuesday's Inauguration of Mayor James A. Sheets 
were, from left, new City Solicitor Stephen McGrath, former councillor Joanne Condon, 
Attorney and former councillor Dennis Harrington, former Mayor Francis X. McCauley and 
Attorney and former Councillor George Burke. 

(Quincy- Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



AUTO-HOME-BUSINESS 

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• OOOR CLOSERS 

• PANIC HARDWARE 

• AUTO KEYS FITTED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY I 

472-2177 



TREAT WILLIAMS ALICE KRICE MARTIN LANDAU 




WORLD PREMIERE ON CABLE 
MONDAY, JANUARY 8 

8PM EASTERN / ENCORE 10 PM 



CHANNEL 40 



Pag* 22 Quinc) Sun Thunday, January 4. 1*90 



Arts/Entertainment 



New Winter, 1990 
Classes At Beechwood Center 



Beechwood Community 
Life Center has announced its 
new classes for Winter, 1990. 

Children's classes include 
"Computer Arcade" on 
Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 12 
noon. There are two five-week 
sessions beginning Jan. 13. 

There will be two ten-week 
"Keyboard" music classes for 
children ages 8-13, beginning 
Jan. 10 and Jan. 13. One class 
is on Saturdays from 1 1 a.m. 
to noon, and the other on 
Wednesday from 4 to 5 p.m. 

Children's art classes 
include "Drop In Art", from 
3:30 to 5 p.m. for grades 1-3 
beginning Jan. 17. "Primary 
Skills and Colors" is a five- 
week art program for children 
grades 1-3 on Saturdays from 
9:30 to 1 1 a.m., beginning 
Jan. 20. 

Chinese calligraphy for 



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1563 Hancock St. 
773-6611 



grades 4, 5 and 6 will be taught 
in two, two-hour sessions 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. on 
February 3 and Feb. 10. 

Music programs for 
children include "Music for 
the Very Young" for children 
2-3 years. This program 
includes two ten-week classes 
(Monday 10:30-11 a.m.) and 
(Thursday 10:30-11 a.m.). 

music program for children 
ages 4-5 taking place on 
Thursdays from 11 to 11:30 
a.m. beginning Jan. 1 1. 

"Music Theatre Workshop", 
a ten-week program including 
a performance at the end, 
begins Monday, Jan. 8, from 
3:30 to 5 p.m. 

"Dancing Around the 
World" for children ages 5 
and older will be directed by 
Nikki Hu, choreographer and 
dancer. This class begins Jan. 
18 and will be held Thursdays 
from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. 

Adult classes will include 
"Introductory Computer," a 
six-week beginner computer 
class, which begins Jan. 8 
from 7 to 9 p.m. 

"Appleworks", provides 
word processing, data base 
and spreadsheet in this six- 
week class beginning 
Wednesday, Jan. 10, from 7 to 
9 p.m. 

"Conversational French I 
& ir are 10-week courses 
beginning Jan. 10 on 
Wednesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. 
and 8-9 p.m. 



"Beginner Sewing Class" 
teaches how to choose a 
pattern, material and follow 
directions. It begins Tuesday, 
Jan. 9, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. for 
ten weeks. 

"Video Taping" instructs 
how to use a new video 
camera in two 2-hour sessions 
on Jan. 29 and Feb. 5 from 7 
to 9 p.m. 

A two-session "First Aid 
Class" on Jan. 18 and Feb. 25 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. will 
teach the basics of Childhood 
First Aid. 

"Candy Making" will teach 
the preparation of several 
varieties of candy in a two- 
hour class on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 
from 7 to 9 p.m. 

"Painted Sweatshirt" will 
instruct in design on Tuesday, 
Jan. 16, from 7 to 9 p.m. 

"Watercolor", a ten-week 
class taught by Sr. Veronica 
Julie, begins Monday, Jan. 8 
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 

"Aerobic Dance and 
Exercise", a low impact 
aerobic program, consists of 
two different 14-week 
programs. One class is 
Tuesday and Thursday from 
6:15 to 7:15 p.m. The other 
class is Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday mornings from 9 
to 10 a.m. Babysitting is 
available for the morning 
class. 

More information may be 
obtained by calling Beechwood 
at 471-5712. Most classes 
require pre-registration. 




QCTV 

LOCAL PROGRAMMING FOR CONTINENTAL CABLEVISION 

brings you a whole line-up of 

New 
Programming 
for the 90's 

Quincy Community Television's 

volunteer producers and crews pull 

together to create a brand new season 

of better than ever local programming. 

*Sports ^Community Events* 
"Political Coverage* 

"Entertainment * 

"Coverage of Issues 

Effecting Quincy" 

"And Much, Much More* 

Stay Tuned to Ch. 3 




THE ATLANTIC MIDDLK SC HOOL Chorus, featuring the talents of over 140 seventh and 
eighth grade students, delighted holiday shoppers at South Shore Plaza , with their C hristmas 
concert "A White Christmas." 

Atlantic School Chorus,^ 
Band Present Concert 



The Atlantic Middle 
School Chorus, directed by 
Gail O. Rafferty, and the 
Atlantic Band, directed by 
Frank Rull. treated holiday 
shoppers at South Shore 
Plai'a to a Christmas concert, 
"A White Christmas." 

The program tcalurcd the 
talents of over 140 seventh 
and eighth grade students and 



was dedicated to the memory 
of the late Irving Berlin. 

Special features of the show 
included a dance number, "A 
Cabbage Patch Sleighride, " 
and a version of "Funky 
Christmas" by New Kids Oh 
The Block. 

Special consultant to the 
students was Maureen A. 



The 



is also the Drama Coach for 
the school's musicals each 
year. 

Special Needs teacher 
Joanne MacFarlane taught 
sign language to 12 students 
for their version of "Silent 
Night." 

Principal Laura 1). Bogan 
and Asistant Principal Cierald 
M. Butler attended the 
concert. 



Mellor. Reading teacher, who 

Velveteen Rabbit' 



At Eastern Nazarene College 



The Communications Arts 
Department of Eastern 
Nazarene College will 
perform "The Velveteen 
Rabbit." as the second show 
of their 1989-1990 season. 

Performances will be held 
at the college. 23 East Elm 
Ave., Wollaston. on Jan. 1 8 at 




lOa.m.Jan. I9at lOa.m. and 
7 p.m., and Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. 

Tickets will be $2 for the 
matinees and $.1 for the 
evening performances. 

Based on the story by 
Margery Williams, the story 
follows the life of a stuffed 
rabbit who longs to be "real" 
to the boy who owns her. "The 
Velveteen Rabbit" nrescnts a 
lesson in love and the true 



meaning of being "real." 

The production is directed 
by Communications Arts 
senior Mark Spence. 
Costume design is by Elaine 
Flin. also a senior in the 
program, and faculty member 
Michael W. Ballard will serve 
as Technical Director. 

For further information or 
tickets, call the college at 77.V 
6.150. 



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Everyday Special 

Open Breakfast 
Everyday Except Sunday 

HOURS 
Mon-Sat 6 a.m.-9 p.m. 

TAKEOUT ORDERS 
FAST SERVICE 

308 QUINCY AVE. 
CALL: 773-9854 



sssssssssss?ssssss&<' 



Ice Skating Classes 
At Shea Rink 



Ice skating classes at the 
Shea Rink for children five 
and up and adults will begin in 
mid-January. 

The cost for the six-week 
series is $45 for children and 
$54 for adults which includes 



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Telephone: 
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64 Billings Road, No. Quincy 
328-9764 - FAX 786-9792 

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Linguini 3.95 

Linguini & Meatball 4.95 

Linguini & Sausage 4.95 

Linguini 

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Zlli may be substituted (or linguini 

ALL OF ABOVE SERVED WITH 

DINNER ROLL, BUTTER, GRATED GHEES'- 



the rink admission fee. 

Registration information 
can be obtained by calling the 
Bay State Ice Skating School 
at 965-4460. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 

1/5-1/11 



TANGO & CASH -R 

12 - 2:1S ■ 4:3S • 7:1S • ftM 

WAR OF THE 
ROSES - R 

11: 45 ■ 2:0S - 4:30 • 7:00 - »:30^ 

WE'RE NO 
ANGELS - PG-13 

12: 00 ■ 2:10 - 4:38 - 7:10 - :30 

CHRISTMAS 
VACATION -PG-13 

11:4S - 2:10 - 4:30 • 7:10 • 0:30 

BACK TO THE 
FUTURE - PG 

11:45-2:05-4:35-7:05-9:25 

BORN ON THE 4TH 
OF JULY - R 

11:30 - 2.00 - 4:30 • 7:00 • 0:40 

STEEL 
MAGNOLIAS - PG 

7:00 - 0:30 

THE WIZARD -PG 

12:00 - 2:10 - 4:35 



Bargain Matlne^ 

First Three Shows 

$3.50 

773-5700 



Thursday, January 4, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 23 



Quincy Cable TV 



Fr. O'Connell Hosting 
New Talk Show 



Ch. 3 

The local program schedule for 
Quincy CaMesystems Ch. 3 from 
Wednesday, Jan. 3 to Friday, 
Jan. 12. 



Wednesday, Jan. 3 

6:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

7 pm Sports Etc. 

8 pm CablelaU 

8:30 pm Senior Smarts 
Thursday, Jan. 4 

6:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 
7:30 pm Quincy City Inaugura- 
tion (R) 

Sunday, Jan. 7 

(53) 5 pm Chinese Programming 



Monday, Jan. > 

5:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

6 pm Sports Rap 

7 pm Sports 

Tuesday. Jan. 9 
5:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 
6 pm Library Booli Nookj 
6:30 pm TBA 

8 pm Talk About the Mind 

Wednesday, Jan. 10 
5:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

6 pm Dan Kever 

7 pm Sports Scene 
K pm Senior Smarts 
8:30 pm TBA 

Thursday, Jan. 1 1 
5;57 pm Rhymes of The limes 
6 pm TBA 



Quincy Sun 
Ch. 26 



Special Video News Reports 
and Features. 

Mondays, 5:30 P M.. 7:30 P.M. 
Tuesdays, 10 A.M.. 5:30 P.M.. 
7:30 P M 

Wednesdays, 10 AM. 5:30 P.M., 
7:30 P.M. 

Thursdays, 10 A.M.. 5:30 P.M.. 
7:.W P.M. 

Fridays, 10 A.M.. 5:30 P.M.. l.W 
PM 
Saturdays. Id AM. 



Fr. Dan O'Connell of 
Sacred Heart Parish in North 
Quincy is hosting one of 
Boston's newest talk shows. 
"We've Got To Talk," on 



Boston Catholic television, 
EWTN, Channel 49. 

The show is shown 
Thursdays at 10 am. and 



Saturday at 2:30 p.m. 

The series is aimed at 
teenagers of all ages with 
topics ranging from music to 
relationships. 



Quincy Featured In Ch. 2 
Domestic Violence Documentary 



By JANE ARENA 

According to the most 
recent statistics, 25,000 people 
were murdered in America 
last year and about half that 
number were killed by 
someone they knew. 

Public health figures show 
that in Massachusetts a 
woman is killed by her 
husband or boyfriend every 
22 days. 

WGBH Channel 2 will 
explore the subject of 
acquaintance violence in a 
one-hour program "Private 
Violence, Public Shame," 
which will air Wednesday, 
Jan. 3 at 9 p.m. Parts of the 
program were filmed in 
Quincy. 

Featured in the program 
are Norfolk County Dist. 
Atty. William Delahunt and 
the work of the Quincy Police 
Department in addressing the 
problem of domestic violence. 
Quincy Patrolman Lane 
WatkinS also Appears in the 
program. 

"Private Violence. Public 
Shame," narrated by actor 
Louis Gossett, Jr., explores 
aquaintance violence through 
three segments, each focusing 
on how different forms of 
violence have shaped four 
lives; a former high school 
football star who is sentenced 
to life in prison for the murder 
of a co-worker, a 32-year old 
man, a victim of violence as a 
child, who is learning to stop 
battering women, and two 
inner-city teenagers who look 
for a way to escape the 
violence of their neighbor- 
hood and find it in the end. 

The program also profiles 
several Boston area agencies. 



including the Cambridge- 
based Emerge, which is one of 
the few agencies in the 
country for men who batter 
women. 

Of local interest is a 
segment on the Quincy Police 
Department, which, in 
conjjnction with Delahunt's 
office, enforce strict 
procedures to protect women 
and get men into treatment in 
cases where domestic violence 
is suspected. 

The program also features 
some leading experts on 
violence prevention, includ- 
ing former Massachusetts 
Commissioner for Public 
Health. Deborah Prothrow- 
Stith. MD. who developed 
violence prevention curri- 
culum now being used in 
many Boston schools. 

"Private Violence. Public 
Shame" examines the subject 
of aquaintance violence from 
all angles and viewpoints, 
offering in<:ic^'« ""(< "Tillable 
information on both its causes 
and prevention. 

The program was written, 
produced and directed by 
Sharon Simon, an indepen- 
dent producer, in association 
with WGBH. 

Although there are no 
immediate plans to broadcast 
the program nationwide, the 
distribution company of 
Coronet MTI Film and Video 
will distribute segments of the 



Save Gas And Money . 
Shop Locally 



BEECHWOOD 
MUSIC SCHOOL 

WINTER CLASSES 

• Private Lessons in all 

instruments 

• Free music theory class 

• Music for the very young 

• Exploring Music 

• Music theater class 

• Special Needs music class 

• Scholarships available 

• "Dancing Around The World" 

with NIkki Hu 

• Piano keyboard class 

• Saturday lessons and classes 

now available 

BEECHWOOD COMMUNITY 
LIFE CENTER 

225 Fenno Street 

Quincy. MA 02170 

471-5712 



program and study guides to 
national audiences on 
request. 

At the end of the program 
WGBH will invite viewers to 
call the National Domestic 
Violence Hotline at 1-800- 
333-SAFE for information on 
local agencies and services. 

In Quincy. the DOVE 
(Domestic Violence Ended) 
provides emergency services 
and shelter to battered women 
and may be reached at 471- 
1234. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



"I 





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Staff: 471-9143 Computer Phone: 328-9090 

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Continental Cablevision 



Pafc U Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1990 




Special Features 



GRUBBY 



By Warren Saltier 



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WEEK OF: January 4 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Ambitious and hard-working are characteristic qualities. You 
also have a qreat sense of responsibility. Some find you lean- 
ing toward the materialistic side. Travel, added prestige, and 
renewed relationships are the themes of 1990; you may find 
as well that they overlap through the year. 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - Februarv 19 

Friends reconcile thanks to your recent efforts. Children seek 
out your advice in a less-than-obvious fashion. Small bonus or 
advancement may arrive after weekend. 

PISCES - February 20 - March 20 

Impromptu trips are highlighted at this time, but it's up to you 
to make the arrangements. Legal matters require careful review. 
Intellectual activities are on tap after the weekend. 

ARIES - March 21 - April 20 

A friend may be unexpectedly frank, but listen to the intent 
rather than the sharp words, if traveling, plan for unexpected 
expenses. Mechanical maintenance demands your attention. 

TAURUS - April 21 - May 22 

An old idea can be taken out of mothballs and refined. Writing 
assignments arc highlighted as well. Two cautions at this time: 
budget extra carefully, and prepare to play the diplomat at work. 

GEMINI - May 23 • June 21 

Neighborhood events may be unusually lime-consuming, 
especially if you take on a leadership position. Partner is in a 
sentimental mood. Coworker is ready to bury the hatchet. 

CANCER - June 22 - July 22 

Signs of improved lifestyle appear, but hard work remains the 
key. Accounting and budgeting tasks require super careful 
review. Avoid procrastination in the health and fitness 
departments. 

LEO - July 23 - August 22 

Projects involving group participation are highlighted over solo 
efforts, provided egos don't intrude. Financial news-brightener 
may arrive after the weekend. Relationship is on a steadier 
course. 

VIRGO - August 23 • September 22 

Division of labor is the key in all activities involving group par- 
ticipation. There are exotic touches to the week-you may be 
experimenting with new cuisines or studying a foreign language. 

LIBRA - September 23 • October 22 

Academic interests are highlighted, formally or informally. You 
excel in the role of teacher-youngsters especially respond to 
your winning approach. Property matters demand caution. 

SCORPIO - October 23 • November 21 

After recent diversification, consolidation is emphasized. Good 
week as well for organizing papers and answering Ictlers. Be 
alerted to a sarcastic sling; keep it in check especially on the 
weekend. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 - December 22 

You have no time for judgemental types and may make your 
case in an effective manner. Watch tendency to take work 
home. Social life can be upbeat provided you make an effort 
to enjoy yourself. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 - January 20 

Cooperation arrives from surprise source and may lead to com- 
pletion of key task on schedule. Good week for mapping out 
professional blueprint. Sports activities arc highlighted on or after 
weekend. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

January 4lh, actress Dyan Cannon 
Aumont; 6th, actress Bonnie Franklin; 7lh, actress Butterfly 
McQueen; 8th, singer Olivia English, 9th, author Charles 
Simmons; lOlh, singer Giscle MacKenzie. 



5lh, actor Jean-Pierre 



Cirosow^M 



ACROSS 

Small wagon 
Semi precious 
stone 

HondLxxjk 
Threadlike 
13. Printing 
measure 
God of love 
Domesticate 
Consumed 
Soapstone 
Place 

Wheel hub 
Decree 
Compass 
point 
Seines 
Foith 

Swedish coin 
Malayion 
conoc 



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9. 
11. 



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16. 
17. 
19. 
21. 
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24. 
26. 

27. 
29. 
31. 
33. 



34. Note of scale 

35. Pleosont 
37. Hard shelled 

fruits 
39. Croft 
41. English baby 

corriogc 

43. Narrow inlet 

44. Bard 

46. Periods of 
time 

48. Atop 

49. Melodies 

5 1 . Season of year 

53. Cook slowly 

54. Male heirs 

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23. English school 
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Thursday, January 4. 1990 Quincy Sun Page 25 



Quincy Hospital Honors Volunteers 



By RUTH WAINWRIGHT 

Quincy Hospital honored 
its nearly 200 volunteers at an 
Evening of Appreciation 

Hospital Director Mark 
Mundy, praised the financial 
contributions of the Hospital 
Auxiliary and thousands of 
volunteer service which made 
possible much of the new 
equipment and services now 
available at the hospital 
"despite the fiscal crisis in 
Massachusetts." 

The auxiliary had already 
contributed $200,000 toward 
the new hospital addition, and 
in 1989 donated another 
$30,000. 

City Council President 
Patricia Toland noted, 
"Quincy Hospital volunteers 
make the largest contribution 
to the city services and their 
money contributions. 

The volunteers' efforts 
which enable the hospital to 
"administer quality care" was 
praised by Irudy Buckley, 
chairman of the hospital's 
Board of Managers. 

Also speaking of the 
volunteer services were 
Margaret E. Crehan, director 
of volunteer services, and 



Marie Wilkinson, second vice 
president of the Quincy 
Hospital Auxiliary. 

Hours contributed by the 
Auxiliary Gift Shop 
Volunteers were headed again 
by Betty Keith, with 24.585; 
followed by Elise Webby. 
10.507. and Cathy O'Connor. 
9.665. Others contributing 
hours of service were Jean 
Coughlin. 844; Marian 
Crosta, 1.655; Ruth Dahl- 
gren. 4,736; Barbara 
DeWolfe. 94. 

Lucille DeCesare, 2,261; 
Flora Dickman. 1.304; llda 
DiMascio. 510; Louise 
Dinegan. 1.138; Anne 
Donovan. 1. 141; Ruth 
Forbush. 660; Natalie 
Fossati. 1.019 Ha/el 
Genereau. 5.726 Eleanor 
Gordon. 1.688; Esther 
Grossman. 19; Carol Herbai. 
538; Olive Hodgkins. 173; 
Myrtle Holland. 6.692; Helen 
Macintosh. 1.886. 

Hazel Maxwell. 1.309; Corine 
McNeice, 3.018; Ardelle 
O'Brien. 249; Barbara Papile, 
5,677; Henry Papile, 198; Sue 
Pendletoh. 2.151; Arthur 
Pent/. 130; Jennie Pent/. 
2.293; Marge Perry. 41; 



Catherine Perruzzi, 41. 

Ruth Rendlc. 1,300; Grace 
Rutan, 65; Esther Sauter. 
1.737; Flo Sleeves, 52; Grace 
Stevens, 1,461; Anna 
Tombari. 8,125; Ruth 
Waring. 1.162; M. Edward 
Webby. 2,421; Marie 
Wilkinson, 769; George 
Zamer. 255; and Nicolena 
Zamer, 7,190. 

Hours of the 98-member 
Volunteer Department 
headed by Margaret Crehan, 
director, included: 

Pauline Aruda, 5.303; 
Donald Black. 424; Eva 
Black, 402; Allyson Borden, 
1,347; Rosalie Branton, 77; 
Lois Burton. 306; Rae Caliri. 
7; Isabelle Cantelli. 262; Ann 
Cappabianca. 690; Virginia 
Carlisle. 741; Dorothy Carter. 
677; Eleanor Carver. 939 
Arlene Cassidy, 1.229; Edith 
Chignola. 576; Marjorie 
Collins. 2.325; Rose Colwell. 
2.800; Lirtada Conant. 1. 1 5 1; 
Janet Curtis. 419; Rita 
Dclgiacco, 417; Marion 
DeSantis, 2.091; Flora 
Dickman, 2,900; Lucille 
DiCesare. 38; Sadie DiCras- 
to. 2,766; Josephine DiTuIlio. 
574; Anna Dooling. 1,160. 
Katherine Doyle. 1,353: 



2 Quincy Women Featured 
At N.E. Christian Conference 



Cheryl Alvord, a counselor 
at Beechwood Counseling 
Service in Quincy, and Jan 
Lanham. associate professor 
of psychology at Eastern 
Nazarene College, will speak 
on surviving abusive pasts at 
the 30th annual Congress of 
the Evangelistic Association 
of New England, Jan. 26-27 at 
Boston Hynes Convention 
Center. 

Approximately 5,000 
people are expected to attend 
the Congress, which is the 



region's largest annual 
Christian conference. 

Highlights of the weekend 
will include discussion of a 
community marriage policy 
that has virtually ended 
divorce in the California 
churches that initiated it. 

Incorporated in 1889, the 
Evangelistic Association of 
New England aims to expand, 
encourage and equip God's 
people throughout the region. 
Approximately 30,000 people 
each year are directly involved 
in at least one of its activities. 



Eai\E has trained more 
than 600 people to minister in 
adult and juvenile correc- 
tional facilities; sponsors 
seminars for pastors and 
other people interested in 
prayer, outreach, meeting 
human needs and starting new 
local churches; publishes a 
monthly newspaper. New 
England Church Life; and 
maintains the region's largest 
data base of Christian 
resources. 

It is the only such regional 
organization in the U.S. 



34 Quincy Residents 
Honored By Carney Hospital 



Thirty-four Quincy 
residents were among long- 
term employees of Carney 
Hospital honored at a recent 
dinner held at the John F. 
Kennedy Presidential 
Library. 

They included Barbara 
Bertoni, Delia Beatty, 
Patricia Brennan, June 
Burns, Sophie Capone, 



Dorothea Clark, Mary Clark, 
Mildred Danelsbeck, Bonita 
Fagerlund, Barbara Nimeskem, 
Julie O'Connor, Carole Saia, 
Marybeth Shieler, five years 
of service. 

Madeline Burke. WiHiam 
Donovan, Barbara Ann 
Dorsey, Mary Hoare, Marie 
Ingram, Marie Ann Maloney, 
Kathleen Musso, Beth 
Tevenan and Mary Whooley, 



10 years of service. 

Lorraine Maccari, Jane 
Hewitt, Elizabeth Hurley, 
Kathleen King, Margaret 
McCarthy, Deborah Ridge, 
Elsie Tomhnson, 15 years of 
service. 

Mary Connaughton, 
Joseph Crowley, Marjorie 
Donahoe, Elaine Hanf, 20 
years of service; and Nancy 
Borden, 25 years. 



Quincy Firm Awarded 

Contract For 
Boston Design Program 



The Quincy landscape 
architect firm of Mary Smith 
Associates has been awarded 
the design contract for the 
City of Boston's Street Tree 
Program for 1 990. 

The project is one phase of 
the city's Public Facilities 
Department (PFD) program 
to beautify city streets. 

In conjunction with the 



PFD and the Parks and 
Recreation Department, the 
firm will be planning the 
planting at 250 to 300 trees in 
several Boston neighbor- 
hoods. 

Mary Smith Associates will 
do on-site evaluation of 
specific streets to determine 
the number and species of 



Traffic Officer 
Speaks At NQHS 



Quincy Police Officer 
Kevin Cook, QPD Traffic 
Bureau Specialist, has twice 
visited North Quincy High 
School as a part of its attempt 
to educate and protect its 
students. 

He attended the November 
North Quincy High School 
Safety Rally for the senior 
class. 



Previously he hau visiieu 
Nancy McGrory's Physics 
class. Her students were 
trying to calculate accident 
figures involving a fatal 
accident that claimed the lives 
of two North Quincy High 
School alumni. Officer Cook 
explained how the Traffic 
Bureau uses trigonometry and 
physics formulas to calculate 
accident data. 



trees to be planted and their 
location. The firm will also 
supervise the landscape 
contractor and monitor the 
progress of the young trees. 

Mary Smith Associates 
provide residential and 
commercial landscape 
architecture and planning 
services to clients throughout 
New England. 

Quincy Girls 

Track 
Fundraiser 



The Quincy girls' track 
team is sponsoring a Papa 
Gino's fund raiser next 
Monday, Jan. 8, at the 
Granite Street location from 5 
to 10 p.m. 

Take out orders will count 
towards the total raised by the 
girls. 



Bill Fahey, 3,819; Evelyn 
Fcldman, 103; Sam Feldman. 
56; Alice Fennelly, 824; Bea 
Fitzgerald, 1,835; Diana 
Freedman, 1,874; Linda 
Gallagher, 1,949; Edward 
Goldberg, 2,241; Eva 
Gorman, 2,409; Mary 
Gralton, 576; Ethel Griffin. 
502; Kathleen Griffin. 29; 
William Griffin. 187; Olive 
Gurney, 1,558; Donna 
Hamilton. 891; Janet Hassler, 
42; Shirley Henderson, 502; 
Martha Herrctt, 7,697; 
Laurence Huddy, 288; George 
Jacobbc, 351; Mary Jordan, 
2,270; Monica Kelsch, 2,916; 
Rita Kenney, 4,261; Jacob 
Krasnigor, 2,411; Adele 
Lauretto, 841; Mary Lavigne, 
18; Gertrude Libby, 2.721; 
Helen Lipp. 2.139; Robert 
Louis, 91; Mildred MacAfee. 
783. 

Inez Madalena. 8; Mark 
Mael. 3,396; Clara Marini. 
386; Marie Marini. 430; 
Marge Martin, 1,274; Mary 
Micciche, 85; Isabel 
Morrison, 162; Jim Morri- 
son. N/R; Sally Moscardelli. 
420; Jim Mullarkey. 555; 
Agnes Murphy. 1.470; 
Catherine McDonough. 
1,546; Eileen McGillvarv. 



934; Mary McGrath, 1.855; 
Marie McKeever, 42; Alice 
McKeough, 1.833; Margaret 
McMillen, 52; Margaret 
McMullen, 1,723; Jane 
McNulty, 160; Kathy 
Noonan, 2,562; Alice O'Brien. 
694; Patricia O'Donnell. 
1,154; Mary Perry. 4,973; 
Charlotte Pollack. 4,481 
Christopher Puricelli, 145; 
Norma Roberto, 1,851; 
Chuck Roberto. 3.395; Helen 
Rogers, 2,514; Mo Rosenfeld. 
6,335; Joan, Scanlon, 566; 
Annette Sheffcr, 671. 

Ann Slotnick, 176; Henry 
Slotnick, 205; Arline Smith, 
1,831; Chris Stannard, 118; 
Sarah Suzedell, 902; Dorothy 
Tucker. 902; Max Vengrow, 
386; Ruth Wainwright, 3,894. 
Red Cross Volunteers. 
Emily Asklund, 7,833; 
Bernice Cutler, 6,341; Pearl 
Quint. 6,047. 

Rev. Maureen Young 
Manns is director of the 
Pastoral Care Staff with 
Anna Williams, office 
volunteer. Linwood Lord and 
Dorothy Sparks are chaplain 
visitors. 

Clinical pastoral education 
students include Lyn Ferrara. 
Robin Knight. Barbara 



Ardio, Carol Burnside, James 
Gehrke, John Gorra, Barbara 
Gray and Nancy Shillman. 

Eucharistic ministers are: 
Deborah Belanger, Maggi 
Belloti, Elizabeth Bertrand, 
Kathryn Burke, Helen 
Callahan, Mary Callahan, 
Ruth Carney. William 
Carney, Rose Comeau, 
Nancy Connelly, Ruth 
Connolly, Jane Dcery, 
Adelaide Dineen, Margaret 
Doherty. 

Also, Domenic DzVo, 
Lucille Fair, Eileen Raherty, 
Mary Foley, Marjorie 
Greene, Dianne Hayes, Anne 
Jennette, Anne Leonard, 
Mary McNamara, Mary 
Maloney, Mary Mulroy. 
Rose Mysiuk, Francis 
O'Brien, Paul O'Brien, Alice 
O'Donnell, Alice Paccioretti. 

Also, Barbara Papile, 
Jennie Pentz, Paula Power, 
Daniel Pritchard, Mary 
Sheehan. Mary Sibella. 
Kherese Skinner. Ellie 
Tessicini, Anne Toland. Lucy 
Tranquillino. Liuda Waing- 
ortin. Barbara Wojner, Ann 
Cripps and Marilyn Wilkin- 
son. 



Gym- Swim Program 
At Lincoln Hancock School 



Recreation Director Barry 
Welch announces that the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment will conduct a 
Gym /Swim Exercise pro- 
gram at the Lincoln Hancock 
Community School Monday 
and Wednesday evenings, 
beginning Jan. 3. 

The program is under the 
supervision of Paula 
O'Malley and will feature two 
separate classes each evening, 
beginning at 6 p.m. and 7 



p.m. Both programs will offer 
exercise of low impact 
aerobics, consisting of warm 
up. cardiovascular exercise, 
and calisthenics designed for 
beginners to intermediate 
level participants. 

Registration for the classes 
can be done at the program 
and participants can elect two 
options for payment. A $25 
one time fee for all classes 
from Jan. 3 to April 30. or $2 
for each individual class. 



payable at the time of the 
class. Participants in the 7 
p.m. class may also 
participate in the adult swim 
at 8 p.m. in the pool located in 
the same building. 

The program is open to 
persons past high school age 
and proper gym attire is 
requested. 

Additional information can 
be obtained by calling 
the Recreation Department 
773-1380. ex I. 204. 



Quincy Junior College Present 
Program In Virginia 



Quincy Junior College and 
Brigham and Women's 
Hospital recently conducted a 
panel discusion about their 
collaborative Advanced 
Placement Nursing program 
at the COMBASE National 
Conference in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. 

COMBASE is an organiza- 
tion comprised of community 
college Presidents and 
Trustees who are committed 
to the concept of community 
college education. The theme 
of the conference was 
preparing for the 21st century 
and its educational needs. 

The panel consisted of 0. 
Clayton Johnson, president 
of Quincy Junior College; 
Jenny James, vice president of 
Nursing Services for Brigham 
and Women's Hospital and 
Patricia Ryan, associate dean 



of Allied HeaJUi /or Quinty 
Junior College. Johnson 
presented the history, 
organizational structure and 
student demographics of the 
college, James discussed the 
workforce demand of her 
institution for skilled labor 
and nursing personnel. It was 
these specific needs that 
precipitated the initial 
discussion between B & W 
and QJC about the possibility 
of developing an Advanced 
Placement Nursing program 
(LPN to RN) for her current 
LPN employees. 

Ryan addressed the unique 
nature of the program from its 
development through the 
approval of the Board of 
Registration of Nursing, to its 
implementation. The pro- 
gram is done collaboratively 
with the Hospital. It is a part- 



time, on site program using 
QJC faculty as well as B & W 
clinical specialists. Students 
are allowed to continue their 
work as LPNs while pursuing 
their studies toward an 
Associate's degree and 
eligibility to take the 
Registered Nurse licensure 
examination. 

The program illustrates a 
model for the collaboration of 
education and industry as 
well. The style could be 
adapted to many other areas 
within the community college 
setting. 

Other presenters at the 
conference were Dale Parnell, 
past president of the 
American Association of 
Community and Junior 
Colleges and a noted author, 
Arthur Cohen of the ERIC 
clearinghouse and Henry 
Figgie of Figgie International. 



Thomas Collins Elected 
Mental Health Chairman 



Thomas F. Collins III was 
elected chairman of the South 
Shore Mental Health Center's 
board of directors at the 
annual meeting in December. 

Harry Shulman was elected 
president; James E. Egan, 
vice chairman; Michael 



iviiictaitiv, i.tujurer; and 
Valerie J. Semensi, clerk. 

Directors incude also Peter 
S. Donadio, Mollie Hirsh- 
berg, Richard D. Armstrong 
Jr., Peter L. Eleey, Herbert D. 
Gianz, Elizabeth A. Houri- 
han, Robert L. Keighton, 
Richard Pierce, Ruth E. 



Walsh and Freja A. Wagner. 
The South Shore Mental 
Health Center, Inc. is a 
private, non-profit agency 
providing mental health and 
mental retardation services to 
the South Shore area and 
specialized services in the 
Greater Boston area. 



Cooperative Bank Declares Dividend 



The Co-operative Bank of 
Concord (NASDAQ: 
COBK) announces the Board 
of Directors has declared its 
16th consecutive quarterly 
dividend. 

The 15 cents per share 
dividend is payable Jan. 1 5, to 



stockholders of record as of 
Dec. 28, 1989. 

The Co-operative Bank of 
Concord, the largest co- 
operative bank in Massachu- 
setts with assets in excess of 
S680 million, is s state 



chartered, FDIC insured co- 
operative bank with 
headquarters in Acton, and 14 
retail banking offices in 
Middlesex, Norfolk and 
Plymouth counties including 
Quincy. 



Page 2* Quincy Sun Thuraday. January 4, 1990 



If I Could Have One Wish Come True 



That everybody in foster homes 
would have a home and a family 
and everybody would give peace 
to each other. We would have a 
great world. 

Adam Goodrich 
Wollaston, Gr. 3 

To meet New Kids On The 
Block. I could at least meet 
Jordan and Donny. I would be 
happy. I'd like to be rich and 
popular like them. I'd like to go to 
one of their concerts. 

Christine Fitzpatrick 

Wollaston, Gr. 3 

* 

It would be for my mother's 
back and leg to get better, and my 
grandmother to get well from her 
stroke. I wish this so my mother 
can go to party's and dance and 
my grandmother can grab things 
with both hands and they can 
both play games with us. I love 
my mother and grandmother very 
much. 

Hector Santlay 
Lincoln-Hancock, Gr. 5 

It would be peace throughout 
the world. So every one could live 
happily. I wish the world would 
be clean and beautiful and 
everyone could get what they 
wanted for Christmas. 

Jennifer Toomey 

Lincoln-Hancock, Gr. 5 

* 

It would be that I could have a 
computer to help me make all 
good grades in my subjects. And 
if I finish my subjects I would do 
experiments in the computer. I 
could play a game on the 
computer. And I could use the 
computer to make a robot and the 
computer can show me the steps 
to make a robot. I am interested 
in computers, I love computers. 
Hudson Nwakanma 
Lincoln-Hancock, Gr. S 

It would be for me to help the 
poor people get food, shelter, 
clothes to wear and money to get 
stuff. I want these people to have 
a happy life. 

Marc Steeves 
Lincoln-Hancock, Gr. 5 

It would be to have a pet. 
Because a pet is for loving and 
adorable. I want a pet because 
they are so cute and cuddly. If I 
have a pet I would train it and be 
nice to it and treat it like a human- 
being. If I have a puppy I would 
name it Nicky. And I would make 
him a pretty be. I would give him 
some treats when he is being a 
good little pup. And give him a 
walk even when I don't feel as 
good as him. 

Kathy Long 
Lincoln-Hancock, Gr. S 

It would be ... No cruelty in the 
world. 1 want a drug-free 
America. No murder, and 
absolutely, positively no war. I 
don't want everybody to be doing 
drugs. 

Peter Hogan 
Wollaston, Gr. 5 

It would be to have peace on 

earth and no crime or war in the 

world. If we had all of these we 

would be living in a better world. 

Neal Shaw 

Wollaston, Gr. S 



It would be for all the homeless 
to have homes, love and care, 
because how would you like to 
live in a big worW with no home, 
love or care? I know 1 wouldn't 
like it. So that is my wish, and I 
hope it will come true. 

Kerri Ward 
Bernazzani, Gr. 3 
* 

It would be a baby brother. 1 
come from a family of all girls, 
and it would be fun to have a boy 
for a change. My father would 
love it! I would too! 

Elizabeth Boc 
Bernazzani, Gr. 3 
* 

It would be to get all the 
presents I want. I would like to 
have my real teacher Mrs. 
McHugh come back because now 
we have lots of substitutes. I hope 
my wish comes true. 

Rachel O'Hara 

Parker, Gr. 3 

* 

It would be a little brown 
puppy. I want it because I love 
dogs. They are very cute. I wish I 
had it because I like to play with 
them. I will feed it and walk it. I 
will do everying with it. 

Katie Erier 

Parker, Gr. 3 

* 

It would be that people have 
shelter. The people who have no 
food would have a nice Christmas 
dinner. Also the people who have 
sicknesses would be happy and 
feel well. The people who do not 
have too much money would have 
presents. My greatest wish would 
be that people who take drugs 
would stop and people who drink 
and drive would stop. I can't 
forget this one, to have peace in 
the world. People who are having 
wars would stop killing people 
and it would be a better world. 
Brenda Linehan 

Parker, Gr. 5 

* 

That all the homeless people 
would have a good meal and 
home. And they would get a good 
job and earn good money and live 
a good life. 

Edward Hogan 
Atherton Hough, Gr. 5 
* 

It would be for my mom and 
dad to have a Merry, Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New 
Year. 

Patricia Dixon 
Bernazzani, Gr. 3 
* 

It would by for my brother, 
Ralph, to come home from South 
Dakota, because I miss him very 
much. 

Daniel Toy 

Bernazzani, Gr. 3 

* 

It would be that I went to a 
Bruins game, and I met Cam 
Neely and Ray Bourque, and I got 
to sit on the Bruins bench with 
them. I wish the Bruins win the 
Stanley Cup. 

Joshua Silverman 
Wollaston. Gr. 3 

It would be to shelter the 
homeless and stop the murders. If 
we did this, the world would be 
more pleasant. 

Tim Wood 
Wollaston. Gr. 5 



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I wish I would have a baby tiger 
for a Christmas present. I want 
that baby tigers to stay that little 
and never grow bigger. The 
reason why I want the tiger to be 
small is some tigers grow big and 
they get killed by hunters and 
sometimes they have to go to the 
zoo. So I don't want them to grow 
up. 

Pui Shan Lai 

Atherton Hough, Gr. 5 

* 

That I could have a lot of 
money, so I could buy food for 
the poor. I'd like this because I 
feel bad for poor people. They 
don't have the stuff we have. They 
don't get things for Christmas like 
we do. I give a lot of money to 
Unicef because lifes terrible for 
poor people. I'd also like to help 
the poor in any way 1 can. 

Tim Semchenko 
Parker, Gr. 5 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P2977E1 

Estate of TIMOTHY F. 

KEARNEY late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that AGATHA 
KEARNEY of BOSTON in the 
County of SUFFOLK be 
appointed executrix named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on January 17, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fourth 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
1/4/90 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

75F1292R2 
To WARREN F. MORTONN 
an absentee, whose last 
known address was 37 
Newton Avenue. Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk having 
property in the County of 
Norfolk: to the Treasurer and - 
Receiver General of said 
Commonwealth to all 
persons claiming an interest 
in the property hereinafter 
described: and to all whom it 
may concern. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court 
praying that Linda Kowilcik 
of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
successor/receiver of the 
following described property 
of said absentee, 37 Newton 
Avenue, Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts in the County of 
Norfolk 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearam:? in paid Court at 
Dedham t^efore ten o'clock in 
the forenoon en the twenty- 
eighth day of February 1990, 
the return day of this 
citation 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire. First Judge of said 
Court, this twenty-seventh 
day of Novemt>er 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R*^ttr 
1/4. 11. 18/89 



That during the week 
Christmas is in, there wouldn't be 
any natural disasters. I think that 
everyone should be happy 
without any worry of an 
earthquake, hurricane, tornado, 
or anything else. I hope everyone 
in San Francisco can be with their 
families. 

Felicia Tarn 
Merrymount. Gr. 5 
« 

For all children to have a happy 
family. I have learned from TV 
that not all kids have parents that 
are together and some kids are in 
foster homes. It would be nice if 
all the children got one or two 
presents they really wanted, but 
most of all, a Christmas with a 
family that truly cared and loved 
them. 

Meredith Hutchinson 
Wollaston, Gr. 3 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3110E1 

Estate of WILLIAM A. 

MITCHELL late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DORIS M. 
MITCHELL of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 7, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-sixth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
1/4/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3095A1 

Estate of MARY F. BURKE 

late of QUINCY In the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that WILLIAM FINN of 
BOSTON in the County of 
SUFFOLK be appointed 
administrator of said estate 
with surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written appearance 
in said Court at Dedham on 
or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on January 31, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
nineteenth day of December, 
in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/4/90 



It would be to see my 
grandfather because I was very, 
very close to him. He died on 
Sept. 3. 1989. His name was 
Edwin Kasper. He was my only 
grandfather. He was 92. He was 
born in 1896 and I loved him very 
much. 

Julie Gibbons 
Atherton Hough, Gr. 3 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No 89P3111E1 

Estate of LUCILE M. 
PRIOLI AKA: LUCILLE 
MARIE PRIOLI late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ANDREW 
VINCENT PRIOLI of BRAIN- 
TREE in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 7, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-sixth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/4/90 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87P3188C1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of CATER I NA 
DiTUNNO late of Quincy, in 
said County, deceased, a 
person under conservator- 
ship. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of Catherine M. 
Perry as Conservator - (the 
fiduciary) of the property of 
said Catherine DiTunno have 
been presented to said Court 
for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the thirty-first day of 
January 1990, the return day 
of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass 
R Civ. P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty-seventh 
day of December, 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register 

1/4/90 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3174A1 

Estate of ANNIE M. RIZZI 

late of QUINCY In the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that NORMAN J. RIZZI of 
SAN FRANCISCO in the 
State of CALIFORNIA be 
appointed administrator of 
said estate without surety on 
the bond 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written appearance 
in said Court at Dedham on 
or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on February 7, 
1990. 

Witness, Rot)ert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-seventh day of 
December, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
1/4/90 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

No. 86-D-1349-D2 

JEANNE MARIE WATTS 

Plaintiff 

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION 

vs. 

ROBERT ALAN WATTS 
Defendant 

To the above-named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff. Jeanne Marie 
Watts, seeking divorce. 

You are required to serve 
upon Jeanne Marie Watts, 
Pro Se, plaintiff's attorney, 
whose address is 42 
Harrington Ave., #2R, 
Quincy, MA 02169 your 
answer on or before January 
31, 1990. If you fail to do so 
the Court will proceed to the 
hearing and adjucation of 
this action. You are also 
arequired to file a copy of 
your answer In the office of 
the Register of this Court at 
Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esq., First Judge of said 
Court at Dedham. 

December 12, 1989 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate Court 

12/28/89 1/4,11/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3179GI 

NCnCE OF GUARDIANSHIP 

of MENTALLY ILL 

To CHARLES CALCAGNO 
of QUINCY in said County 
and to all persons interested 
in the estate of CHARLES 
CALCAGNO and to the 
Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health, a petition 
has been presented in the 
above-captioned matter 
praying that JOHN B. 
CALCAGNO of BRAINTREE 
in the county of NORFOLK 
and ALBERT V. CALCAGNO 
of MILTON in the county of 
NORFOLK and INEZ D. 
TROMBARI of QUINCY in 
the county of NORFOLK be 
appointed guardians of 
mentally ill with surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written appearance 
in said Court at Dedham on 
or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on February 7, 
1990. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, this 
twenty-seventh day of 
December, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/4/90 



Tliursday, January 4, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 27 




HELP WANTED 



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OPPORTUNITIES 
DEALERS NEEDED 

To sell our casual line of PVC 
pipe furniture. Write to Charles 
Retiello, 45 Pinette St. No. 
Dartmouth. MA 02747 

1/4 



SERVICES 



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Mother of 5 grown children will 

tMbysit infants to 5 year olds in 

my home. Houghs Neck area 

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1/2 

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sweatshirts, sweatpants 

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FOR SALE 

Home Heater Oil Burner. Good 
condition $50 1/3 Horse Hot 
Air Heater Blower Motor - New 
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1/4 

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Vehicles from $100. Fords. 
Mercedes. Corvettes. 
Chevys. Surplus. Buyers 
Guide (1) 805-687-6000 
Ext. S-3019 1/4 



REAL ESTATE 



ATTENTION 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U-repair). Delinquent 
property Repossessions 



tax 

Call 1-602-838-8885 Ext GH 

2379 1/18 



PERSONALS 



SHAKESPEARE SAID: 

"Whore Ignorance is bliss, 'tis 
lolly to be wise" — He was 
wrong - Try doing without 
food, shelter, clothing etc . a 
by-product of education 
Without education there is only 
misery ahead! 

- Frank Ansalmo 

1/4 

THANK YOU 

St. Jude. St. Anthony. 

St. Bridgit for favors 

granted 

CM F 

1'4 



SERVICES 



INSIDEOUT 

Deleading & 
Painting Co. 

» MA Certificate 000161 

• Reasonable Prices 

• Free Estimates 

Call 471-2843 
Leave Message 



R 



FAMILY COUNSELOR 

Retired teacher, master's in 
Education Certified in 
counseling and Gerontology 
desires part time work with 
seniors or as a family 
counselor. 479-M79 

1/4 



FOR RENT 



STORE/OFFICE 

600 sq. ft. $480 ask Barber 

Shop to show. 65 Billings 

Rd., 1 wk free rent w/adv. 

734-8172 

1/4 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite - Capacity 300 
Venetian Room-capacity VO. 
Call 472-5900 TF 

HALL FOR HIRi 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St. 

Oulnpy 

472-2223 

TF 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 

HALL FOR R^NT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St. 

479-6149 

TF 

WANTED 

HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Old woodworking tools, hand 

planes, surplus hand tools; all 

trades. Precision machinist 

tools, shoplots 

558-3889 also 527-1916 

4/5 

WANTED TO BUY 

Furniture - Estates 
Highest prices for entire 
contents -attic to cellar. Also 
separate items-tx>ks, clocks, 
wicker, prints, glass, etc Call 
Alden 472-4917 

2/22 



Old and New 
Furniture Bought 

Also rugs, clocks, paintings, 

glassware and bric-a-brac 

749-6475 



OLD OIL PAINTINGS 
WANTED 

Wanted to buy old oil 
paintings; Marine, landscape. 
Impressionist or Traditional 
Also Watercoiors. old books, 
prints, frames and postcards 
558-3839 Also 527-1916 

2/12 



EVEmoors marketpuce 



SERVICES 



KITCHENS and BATHROOMS 
REMODELED 

Need a 2nd bathroom? 
or REPAIR the DAMAGED one! 

Minor Repairs & Tiie Worl( 

No Job is Too Small 
FREE ESTIMATE - CALL 472-1310 

Lie. #247 TF Since 1960 




Protect Your Investment 

Coletti Paintina 

Gutters Cleaned ^^ 

3720 ^ 



Interior & Exterior 



786-1864 Mark Coletti 773-3720 

North Quincy Free Estinnates '^" 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 
t REWIRING 



ROBERT L.ELLIS 

Decks, Porches, Remodeling, Replacement 

Windows, Vinyl Siding, Storm Windows, Doors 

Licensed and Insured 

Free Estimates 

331-9977 

TF 



EDDIE'S WELDING & 
METAL FABRICATION 

Offers portable service in all 
types of repairs and light iron 
fabrication. Free Estimates 
(617)471-2059 



3/1 



RENEY ELECTRICAL 

Residential/Commercial 

Licensed/lnsurec 

No job too small/24 Hrs 

References 

Call Stephen Reney 

773-9357 Llc.»E30643 

1/11 



CARPENTRY 

Roofing, Painting, Porch Work, 

Vinyl Siding, Windows. Doors, 

Gutters, Etc. 

No Job Too Small 

Free Estimates 

T. Sweeney 825-1210 

3/2fl 



LOSE WEIGHTI 

Safely and effectively as Oprah 

at one fifth the cost with "Food 

For Life Weight Management 

System" 

Call 472-9662 or 
696-1089 

2/17 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 

LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

HOME REPAIR 

MADE AFFORDABLE 

Interior-Exterior Work 

No Job Too Small 

Call Dan Brown 472-9662 

1/25 

PAINTING 

Interior • Exterior 

Wallpapering • Wood Staining 

Licensed • Insured 

We use 1st Quality Products 

You get Top Quality Results 

For Estimates Call 

963-1613 1/25 

WALLCOVERING 

Residential/Commercial 

Free Estimates 

Call John Stankus 

479-1104 or 269-0352 

1/18 

ALFRED W. SWEENIE 
CPA 

1362 Washington Street 
Weymouth. MA 02169 
Accounting and Taxes 
335-3252 1/4 



A & T Vacuum 

> 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

t Sewing machine repairing 

> VCR repairing and cleaning 

> Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc ) 

> Oreck XL Vacuums 

> Electroluxw/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St , So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




SULLIVAN 

LANDSCAPE 

AND 

TREE SERVICE 

Free Estimates 

472-3595 



3/1 



^£ 00 IT ALc 
WELDING CO. 



QUINCY^ 479-0991 

1/4/90 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 




CV^an/ie/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 

MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quiricy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D 4.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 3 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable TV. for only $1 per day. 



INDEX 



D Services 

D For Sale 

D Autos 

a Boats 

D. For Rent 

D Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pets, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

D Antiques 

D Coins a Stamps 

a Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

P Day Care 

D Personal 

D Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abbreviated if neccesary. 



QUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 
8 WEEKS 



D $4.20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of the same ad 
10$ each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 4 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable T.V. for only $1 per day. 

D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions fo same ad, 
IOC each additional word Channel 26-Sun Cable for 5 days at 
$1.00 per day 



QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 

SUN CABLE 
T.V. ONLY 



D $3.85 per insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 

same ad, IOC each additional word. 
D With your Sun ad, you can also run for 7 days on Channel 26-Sun 

Cable TV. for only $1 per day. 

D Run your ad on Channel 26-Sun Cable TV alone for 3 days at 
$2 per day. 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun and 



-for tfie following ad to run 



.weeks 



-days on Channel 26. 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WILL BE MrtDE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE !N THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION 
DEADLINE: TUESDAY. 10:00 AM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD 



J 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Tkunday, January 4, 1990 



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Financial contributions are necessary to make the annual Quincy Christmas ^' 
Festival programs successful. Without the support of the businesses listed 0. 
in this advertisement, these festive events would not be possible. ^ 




Diaiik You. Thank You. 



A Very Grateful 



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ehristmas 



FESTIVAL 
COMMITTEE 



250,000 Turn Out For Christmas Parade 



Threatening skies and cold 
temperatures didn't keep an 
estimated quarter of a million 
people from attending the 
38tli annual Christmas 
Festival Parade in Quincy 
Center on Sunday, although 
that number was down a little 
from the anticipated 300.000. 

The parade, on the theme 
of '■.'\ Storybook Christmas." 
kicked off at 12:30 and took 
just over an hour to pass by. 



Spectators from all over 
the South Shore lined the 2.8 
mile route and delighted in 
the several floats, marching 
bands, color guards and 
5[>ecialty units participating 
in the parade. 

This year's parade was 
dedicated to the memory of 
Thomas M. McDonald, who 
had been involved with the 
parade since it began in 1 95 1 . 
McDonald died last 
December. 

This year's grand marshal 
was North Quincy native 



Ken Coleman, long-time 
radio "Voice of the Boston 
Red Sox." Coleman, who 
now lives in Cohasset, began 
his broadcasting career 
covering high school football 
on WJDA. 

According to tradition, 
floats illustratmg the parade 
theme competed for trophies 
and prizes in both commer- 
cial and non-commercial 
categories. 

Winners and their prizes 
were: 

Quincy Bay Race Week 



Association took flrst place 
for their float, "The Story of 
Rudolph the Red-Nosed 
Reindeer." They received the 
Fr. Thomas Tiemey Trophy 
and $1,000. 

Quincy Junior College won 
second prize with "It's a 
Snow White Christmas," and 
was awarded $500. 

The Germantown Yacht 
Club flnished third with its 
entry "Christmas With Peter 
Pan in Never, Never Land," 
and was awarded a $300 
pnze. 



The Woodward School 
took fourth place with "The 
Little Engine That Could," 
float and won $200. 

Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank took the Best Com- 
mercial Roat for its entry 
depicting characters from 
"The Wizard Of Oz. " 

The Mayor's Trophy for 
the Best Quincy Roat was 
awarded to the United First 
Parish Unitarian Church for 
its entry titled "The First 
Christmas Story." 

High School Marching 



Bands also competed for 
prizes in the Chnsimas 
Parade. Bands in each of the 
four divisions were judged on 
marching and music. 
Winners were: 

Division 1. Chicopec High 
School Band with a total 
score of 78.4; Division II. 
Abington High School Band, 
with a total score of 86.1; 
Division III. Agawam High 
School Band with a score of 
86.5 and Division IV. 
Shepherd Hill High School 
Band, who scored 94.4. 



SHOWN BELOW ARE THE MAJOR SPONSORS OF THIS YEAR'S 
38th ANNUAL CITY OF QUINCY CHRISTMAS PARADE. 



JhePitriot 



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giKl¥[E[g 




A CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL COMMITTEE AND 
THESE ORGANIZATIONS AND BUSINESSES 
FESTIVAL SEASON PROGRAMS... WITHOUT 

• BayBank/Norfolk 

• Burke Distributing Co. (Miller) (Millerlite) 

• First American Bank For Savings 

• George F.Bryant Post 613 

• Bank of New England (Hancock) 

• Bank of Boston 

• The Boston Five 

• N.Q. Business & Professional Assoc. 



A GRATEFUL GENERAL VIEWING PUBLIC "HEARTFELT THANK YOU" TO 
THAT CONTRIBUTED FINANCIALLY IN SUPPORT OF THE 1989 CHRISTMAS 
WHOM THESE EVENTS WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE. 



• National Fire Projection Association 

• Quincy Cooperative Bank 

• The Quincy Savings Bank 

• The Quincy Sun 

• South Boston Savings 

• The South Shore Bank 

• State Street Realty 

• Shawmut Banks 



• WJOA 

• Stop & Shop Supermarkets 
Bradlees Dept. Store 

• Continental Cablesystems 

• Quincy Rotary Club 

• VFW Ladies Auxiliary and Ladies 
Auxiliary Color Guard 

• Jack Conway Realtors 




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i^ Christmas i^ Santa's i^ Nativity i^ Santa's i^ The Annual ik^ Elementary 
Lighting Arrival Pageant Mail Boxes Awards Event School Christmas 

Poster Contest 




KEN COLEMAN, Quincy native, long time 
radio "voice of the Red Sox and grand 
marshall of Sunday's Quincy Christmas 
Parade, rides down Hancock St. in an open 
convertible with his son, Bill, and grandson, 
Casey James, age 3. 





THIS YEAR'S QUINCY Christmas Parade was dedicated to the nfiemory of former com- 
mittee member Thomas "Tom" McDonald, Mr. McDonald, who served for many years 
on the festival committee, died a few weeks after last year's parade. 







eason's i "ireetinqs 



Christmas Festival Committee Members 



George F. White (General Chairman), Kathy Bubas, Ann Morrill, Bill Morrill, Mary Blood, Gene Healey 
Mike Demasi, Laurel Peddle, Frances Flynn, Mike McFarland, Bernie Reisberg, Gloria Noble Bob Noble 
Rita Kelhher, Jack Nigro, Andrea Noble, Agnes Trillcott, Herb Fontaine, Lt. Francis Mullen Ray Cattaneo' 
Tony Sicihano, Joe Pearson, Alfred Petta, Remo DeNicola, Steve McGrath, Pat Toland Bryant Carter ' 
Ed Holland and Ed Fiddler. y«»"HOdrter, 



r\ 




flU iflR »9k tn aA JBl 



For Outstanding Community 



^960 






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,,, WASHINGTON i1. 
<,|N^<^v /^yi^ 0216';- 



Clara Yeomans Sun 'Citizen Of Year' 



Clara Yeomans, a long-time 
environmental activist who still 
"appreciates every blade of grass" 
has been selected as The Quincy 
Sun's "Citizen of The Year" for 
1989. 

Mrs. Yeomans, now a free-lance 
natural resources consultant to the 
community— schools, clubs and 
organizations— was selected from 
among 37 nominees submitted by 
Quincy Sun readers. 

A lO-memberpanel — representing 
the community -made the final 
selection from those 37 nominees. 

Mrs. Yeomans, charter member 
and former executive secretary of 
the Quincy Conservation 
Commission and president of Save 
Our Shores, is the fifth winner of 
the award established in 1985 to 
annually honor an individual for 
outstanding community service or 
for a special achievement. 



Prior winners were Anthony 
Siciliano, Deputy Civil Defense 
Director; Ruth Wainwright, long- 
time community volunteer, the late 
Richard J. Koch, Sr. a leader in 
community and charitable causes 
and Martin Finnegan, Director of 
Athletics in the Quincy Schools 
and coordinator of Project 
Impact, an innovative program to 
train teachers and community 
adults to help youngsters deal with 
drug, alcohol and other problems. 

Mrs. Yeomans, who lives at 1 15 
Winthrop Ave., Wollaston, was 
nominated by Corinne Mitchell of 
Hillside Ave., Wollaston, who 
said: 

"Clara has worked tirelessly 
through the years to preserve and 
protect our environment and to 
educate our citizenry. She has 
volunteered her time and energy to 
many organizations among which 



are the League of Women Voters, 
Quincy Conservation Commission, 
Save Our Shores, Friends of the 
Blue Hills and many others. "At a 
time when an understanding of our 
resources is so important." 

Sun publisher Henry Bosworth 
congratulated Mrs. Yeomans for 
her 30 years of service— most of it 
unpaid. 

"She was speaking out back then 
when environmentalists were 
considered by many as 
obstructionists to progress but 
time proved were quite on target 
with their concerns." 

Mrs. Yeomans, when informed 
she had been selected for The Sun 
Citizen of The Year Award said: 

"I am delighted. I am honored. 
It is a great reward to be 
recognized like this for doing 
something you strongly believe 

(C.onl'd on Pafir 5) 




CLARA YEOMANS 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bo$worth) 





VOL. 22 No. 16 



Thursday, January II, 1990 





Nearly $600,000 Owed 

Real Estate Tax 

Delinquents Face 

Foreclosure Action 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The city is preparing to take foreclosure action on approximately 300 
delinquent real estate tax titles if the taxes totalling nearly $600,000 are not 
paid. 



END OF A LANDIM.ARK ~ The uld surgical building at Quincy Hospital was recently 
demolished tu make way fur a parking lot. Services inside the uld building are nuw lucated in the 
hospital's new facility. 

(Quincy Sun />/i«>/«> /»v 7V</ii (iurman) 

MacRitchie Counsel To Police 

Sheets Names 4 
To Law Department 



Mayor James Sheets has 
appointed four to the city's 
law department, appoint- 
ments he says are "tailored- 
made to meet the environ- 
mental challenges that we face 
in the 1990s." 

On Tuesday, Sheets 
announced the following 
appointments effective Feb. 2: 

• Present City Solicitor 
Joseph "Jay" MacRitchie will 
become the new legal counsel 
to the Quincy Police 
Department. The position 
carries a $35,000 annual 
salary. 

• James Timmons and 
Thomas Largey have been 
appointed assistant city 
solicitors. The annual salary 
for that post is $39,000. 

• Jeff Brids will become 
the department's special 
counsel and receive $35,000 
annually. 

Sheets had already 
appointed former city 
councillor Stephen McGrath 
the new city solicitor. 

In making the announce- 



ments, the mayor said the law 
department will "vigorously 
pursue" environmental issues, 
notably the MWRA and 
Clean Harbors. 

Sheets said the city will file 
a lawsuit against the MWRA 
by Feb. 12 in an attempt to 
prevent the authority from 
operating a permanent sludge 
facility at the former General 
Dynamics shipyard in Quincy 
Point. 

The city will also consider 
joining the Town of 
Weymouth in a legal battle 
against a proposal by Clean 
Harbors, Inc., for a 
hazardous waste rotary kiln 
incinerator in the Fore River 
industrial basin. 

In particular, Quincy will 
consider filing litigation 
relating to the rules and 
regulations of the Site Safety 
Council which determines 
what areas are feasible for 
hazardous waste. 

McGrath said the law 
department will be spending a 
"substantial" amount of time 



dealing with environmental 
issues, particularly the 
MWRA and Clean Harbors. 

Sheets said he was satisfied 
with the appointments while 
McGrath said the additions 
will create "a very strong law 
office." 

McGrath also noted that he 
will be meeting with existing 
and new personnel to 
familiarize them with cases so 
that there is a "smooth 
takeover." 

The appointments are not 
full-time positions. McGrath 
explained that that has never 
been a requirement. "It's safe 
to say it has never been a 
problem," he said. 

McGrath said the city will 
defmitely file a lawsuit against 
the MWRA by Feb. 12. 
Concerning Clean Harbors, 
he said the city is considering 
joining Weymouth in 
litigation against the firm. 

McGratli has contacted 
Weymouth officials regarding 
the issue but has not discussed 

(t»ni d on Pa/ie 28) 



Deadline to pay the 
outstanding bills is Thursday, 
Jan. 25 at 10 a.m., said Dana 
Childs, the city's tax collector- 
treasurer. Once the deadline 
passes, the city can take the 
first legal step toward 
foreclosure, Childs said. 

"The next step is the actual 
taking of tax titles. From 
there, the foreclosure process 
begins at land court (in 
Dedham)," he said. 

"We have had some 
foreclosures in the past." 

According to Childs, this is 
the most outstanding real 
estate money since the city 
began aggressively pursuing 
delinquent tax money under 
former Mayor Francis X. 
McCauley. 

During the eight years 
McCauley was in office, $8.9 
milhon in delinquent tax 
money and interest was 
collected. In the six and a half 
years prior to the McCauley 



administration, the city 
collected slightly more than 
$2 million. 

When McCauley took 
office in 1982, the city had 65 1 
delinquent tax cases totalling 
more than $7 million. About 
$1.6 million of this amount 
was money legally withheld 
by General Dynamics that 
resulted from tax abatement 
cases during 1977 and 1980. 

However, since 1982, the 
city has increased its 
delinquent tax collections by 
at least 283 percent. 

The real estate tax titles 
range from homes and 
businesses to vacant lots and 
"some that are balances left 
when the taxpayer paid the 
original bill late," Childs said. 

Most of the 300 delinquent 
titles, which total $598,700, 
arc from 1989 real estate bills 
but there are a few from 1988. 

A complete list of 1988 and 
1989 outstanding real estate 



tax titles is in the legal 
advertisement section in this 
issue of The Quincy Sun 
placed by the city. 

About 26 percent of the 300 
titles are properties belonging 
to the Ricciardi Development 
Company, Childs said. 
Ricciardi's 86 delinquent tax 
titles totaling $155, r6 
include the Summit View 
project in West Quincy. That 
project alone has $42,446 in 
outstanding taxes. 

Given the city's tight 
financial situation, Childs 
said it is important to collect 
as much delinquent tax 
money as possible. 

"Collecting the delinquent 
money absolutely means 
more now than before," 
Childs said. He explained that 
delinquent tax money which 
is collected can lessen the 
amount of revenue the city 
has to borrow. The less money 
(Cont'd on Page 4) 



Board Calls Restaurant 
Owner On Violations 



By JANE ARENA 

Peter Kelly, owner of 
Kelly's In The Square, 15 
Cottage Ave., will be 
requested to appear before the 
Quincy License Board at its 
next meeting, Jan. 16, at 10 
a.m., to "show just cause why 
his license should not be 
permanently revoked," said 
Board Chairman John Gillis. 

The hearing is in relation to 
alleged violations of the city's 



closing violation and fire 
regulations on the night of 
Dec. 23, 1989. 

According to reports issued 
by Deputy Fire Chief Tom 
Gorman, and Police Officer 
Paul Keenan, customers and 
the bartender were discovered 
drinking in the restaurant, 
after the regulated 1:15 a.m. 
deadline. 

The violation was discov- 
TTT'* "f^rr a ^r\ nowder fire 



extinguisher had been 
discharged, causing smoke 
detectors to activate and the 
fire alarm to sound, the report 
said. According to City Fire 
Regulations, all customers 
must be evacuated from a 
building when a fire alarm 
sounds. 

The board will send Kelly a 
letter informing him that he 
must attend the Jan. 16 
meeting. 



Pa|t 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, I9M 




ICE SCULPTOR Martin McCovern displays his work, a sled and Santa's reindeer, on the front 
lawn of the Quincy Neighborhood Club. The sculpture, which took Martin hours of work in 
near lero temperatures to complete, freeted some 300 members who attended the annual club 

Christmas party. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charlen Ftagg) 



JANUARY 



License 
KisDUCm ONSI I Board 

■*- ■ ^'m^mmni m ^ tM t 

Eileen's 

Special 
Sizes 

SAVE NOW 

30% 

50% 



EVEN 



75% 

On Selected Items! 



Shop Early for the 
Beut SelectionI 



SMITS - SIZES 30-48 

SWEATERS - SIZES 38-46 

ROBES - SIZES 1-4X 

HOUSES - SIZES 36-60 
PANTS - SIZES 30-56 
COATS • SIZES 3S-S2 

HAZERS - SiZiS 31.46 



Quincy 's Oniy Store Specializing in Half Sizes 

1454 Hancock St., Quincy 479-7870 

(Across from Child World) 

OPEN 9:30 TO 5:30 THURS & FRI TIL 9 



Briefs 

The Quincy License Board 
took the following action at 
Tuesday's meeting at City 
Hall: 

• Granted a request from 
the North Quincy Girl's 
Basketball Team for canning 
dates to be held Friday, Jan. 
19, Sat., Jan. 20, and Sun., 
Jan. 21. 

• Continued for one week 
a hearing on a request from 
the Furnace Brook Golf Club 
for a change of manager from 
Everett A. Bragdon to 
Malcolm S. Holm. 

• Continued for three 
weeks a request from Adel 
Abdel Rahman Mahmoud for 
a common victualer license 
for Jim's Catch, 1635 
Hancock St. Mr. Mahmoud 
must present architectural 
plans and review the request 
with the Fire, Heahh and 
Building Departments. 

• Continued for one week 
a request from William B. 
Calapa to have seating for 10 
to 12 people at Original 
Joseph's Catering and 
Restaurant, 273 Willard St. 
Y^t continuation is to allow 
the Building Department to 
check zoning requirements. 



People Advance by Degrees 

As we enter the 1990's education can become your ticket 
to a successful career. As the job market becomes increasingly 
more technical, higher level skills are necessary to compete. 
At Quincy Junior College we offer a variety of programs as 
well as GED preparation and Developmental Education. 
If you would like more information on hew education can 
help prepare you for the future, call our Admission's Office at 
984-1700 for an appointment or ask for our brochure. 

Quincy Junior College 

Degree Programs: 

Legal Secretary 



Accounting 

Business Management 

Communication 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Early Childhood Education 

Executive Secretary 



Liberal Arts 

Marketing 

Medical Secretary 

Office Administration 

Paralegal Studies 

Real Estate Management 

Retailing 



Hospitality Management 
Hotel/Restaurant Management Secretarial Programs 

Travel Management 

Certificate Programs: 
Health Careers Preparatory Paralegal Studies 
Office Assistant Medical Secretary 

Classes Begin January 22 

WALK I N REGISTRATION 8am to 8pm M Th 
i ^ 8am-4pm Friday 

I CI or Call 984-1650 for brochure 

I ^^Li.^ Quincy Junior College 

^^i^M 34 Coddington StrMt, Quincy, MA 021 69 

Dajt Evening and Saturday Courses available 



Quincy Police Redefining 
Media Relations Policy 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

In an attempt to maintain a 
relationship with news media 
representatives based on 
trust, cooperation and mutual 
interest, the Quincy Police 
Department is redefining its 
media relations policy 
regarding the release of 
information to the media. 

The new policy, which has 
been drafted but not finalized, 
will set guidelines concerning 
the media's request for 
information and protect the 
legitimate interests of affected 
parties from prejudicial 
publicity. 

Once the policy is fmalized, 
police officers will be trained 
in the new procedures. Chief 
Francis X. Finn said. 

The new guidelines are 
being formulated in response 
to the department's handling 
of a series of sexual assaults 
which occurred in Wollaston 
last year. 

Last month, former Mayor 
Francis McCauley faulted the 
police for failing to alert 
residents about the incidents. 

Four women have been 
sexually assaulted in 
Wollaston since last April but 
it was not until early 
December that police 
acknowledged the rapes had 
taken place. 

Finn said the local media 
were not notified immed- 
iately "in order to enhance our 
opportunity to apprehend the 
suspects." Finn noted that 
administrators at Eastern 
Nazarene College, where all 
but one of the rapes occurred, 
have been kept informed of 
the investigation. 

On Monday, Finn met with 
police officers, a representa- 
tive from the Norfolk County 
District Attorney's office and 
local media representatives 
and outlined the new policy. 
He emphasized that this is the 
department's policy, adding 
his was not trying to tell the 
media how to gather their 
information. 

"This is a policy of the 
Quincy Police Department in 
cooperation with the press. 
We are bound by it," Finn 
said. 

In instances involving one 
or more agencies such as the 
Norfolk County District 
Attorney's office, the agency 
having primary jurisdiction 



shall be responsible for 
releasing or coordinating the 
release of information, the 
chief emphasized. 

He also stressed that 
members of the department 
must exercise care, common 
sense and discretion to avoid 
releasing statements or 
information which, if later 
quoted, may create a 
misunderstanding or comp- 
romise the effectiveness of an 
investigation. 

The three-page policy 
outlines administrative and 
operational procedures while 
listing information that may 
and may not be released to the 
media. It also explains the 
duties of the public 
information officer and who 
the proper spokesperson is in 
a particular situation oi 
circumstance. 

The chief of police or his 
designee is the official 
spokesperson of the 
department regarding 
administrative affairs. The 
public information officer is 
the administrative assistant to 
the chief. In his absence, the 
chief will designate a superior 
officer to act his place. 

The public information 
officer's duties include: 

• Assisting news person- 
nel in covering routine news 
stories. 

• Being available for on- 
cali responses to the news 
media. 

• Preparing and distribut- 
ing news releases. 

• Arranging for and 
assisting at news conferences. 

• Coordinating and 
authorizing the release of 
information for all majoi 
incidents. 

• Assisting in crisis 
situations. 

• Coordinating and 
authorizing the release of 
information concerning 
departmental policies, 
procedures and operations. 

If there is any doubt as to 
whether such information 
should be divulged, inquiries 
will be referred to the chiefs 
office. Any information 
released to an officer incharge 
shall be reported to the public 
information officer as soon as 
possible. 

Because the department is 
regularly involved in events at 
which members of the news 



media are present and 
performing their task of 
gathering information, Finn 
said his department has a 
three-fold responsibility: 

• To cooperate with 
media efforts to obtain and 
disseminate factual informa- 
tion. 

• To protect the constitu- 
tional rights of accused 
persons. 

• To bring the police 
operation at hand to a 
successful conclusion. 

To accomplish this, the 
department, when requested, 
will provide complete and 
accurate information within 
legal limits to all accredited 
media reps, Finn noted. 

Regarding operational 
procedures, the present draft 
states that media reps "may be 
admitted wihin police lines 
but not within the actual 
crime scene during an active 
investigation." 

In the case of a major 
disaster or other public 
emergency, representatives 
may be permitted within 
police lines but they should be 
notified of any present or 
potential danger and that 
under such conditions the 
police department is not 
responsible for their physical 
safety. 

The officer in charge of any 
incident may also deny access 
to the media if, in his opinion, 
their presence may inhibit, 
threaten or compromise 
legitimate policy activity or 
objectives. 

In addition, police may 
allow photographers to 
photograph persons in police 
custody except in instances 
where an identification has 
not been completed and the 
possibility of a line-up exists. 
"Officers will not pose 
prisoners for photographers 
nor will they alow prisoners to 
be photographed by news 
media inside police head- 
quarters." the policy states. 

The draft policy also breaks 
down what information may 
be released and whay may not 
be released. 

Information that presently 
may be released includes 

• Fact that a crime has 
been committed. 

• Technical name of the 
crime by statutue, ordinance. 

(Cont'd „i, I'afiv 2Hl 



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Authorities Investigating 
Weekend Fight 
In Germantown 



Thuraday, January II, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Local, state and federal 
authorities are investigating 
the cause of a weekend fight in 
Germantown which left six 
youths injured and questions 
whether the incident was 
racially motivated. 

On Monday night, Sgt. 
Thomas Casey, the Quincy 
Police civil rights officer, said 
the fight involving between an 
estimated 40 and 80 black and 
white youths ages 17 to mid- 
20s was not racially 
motivated. 

"At this point, we're not 
calling it a racially motivated 
incident. There was a lot of 
name calling on both sides 
here," he said. 

Investigators from the 
Norfolk County District 
Attorney's office and U.S. 
Department of Justice along 
with local police are 
investigating to determine the 
exact cause of the brawl which 
began at 1:30a.m. Saturdayat 
the rear of 144 Taffrail Rd. 



According to Chief Francis 
Finn, the incident apparently 
originated from a fight 
between a black youth and a 
white youth. He said they 
were playing pool and 
tempers fiared over a girl. 

Finn said the two went 
outside for a fight. At this 
time, a nearby get-together 
was disbanding and the 
youths leaving this party were 
attracted to the fight, the chief 
explained. 

According to Casey, the 
incident spilled out onto the 
street and other youths in the 
area "flocked to the area after 
the fight started." 

Police arriving on the scene 
found blacks and whites 
fighting with their fists and a 
baseball bat was recovered at 
the scene. 

The first officer on the 
scene found a black youth and 
white youth on the ground 
unconscious. He then called 
for assistance. In all, eight 



cruisers, eight officers and a 
supervisor responded. 

Six youths received minor 
injuries and were transported 
to local hospitals. Five were 
taken to Quincy Hospital and 
one to Carney Hospital. 

Casey said all were treated 
and released. 

Paul McDonough, 22, of 
575 Sea St., and James 
Russell, 21, of 191 Taffrail 
Rd., were arrested for 
disorderly conduct. 

Authorities are investiga- 
ting to determine whether any 
civil rights were violated. 
Casey said District Attorney 
William Delahunt will 
determine what charges, if 
any, will be filed regarding 
those involved. 

Accordmg to Casey, the 
brawl involved youths from 
Germantown and other 
sections of the city as well as 
some from outside Quincy, 
including Mattapan. 




Board Approves Package 
Store License Transfer 



A CHECK FOR S5,000 was recently presented by Ward 6 Councillor Thomas Nutley to Quincy 
after School Child Care at the Squantum School. Receivinc the checli are Site Coordinator 
Carol Mann and Child Care Director Sine Pounder. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charles Ragg} 

Morrissey Wants 

MWRA Charlestown 

Lease Probed 



By JANE ARENA 

The License Board Tuesday 
granted a request from 
Robert D. Hosmer of the R & 
JH Corporation for a transfer 
of the retail all-alcoholic 
license as held by M.R.H.T. 
Corporation, 385 Hancock 
St., doing business as 
Murphy's Liquor Store. 

Atty. Thomas Faust, 
representing Hosmer, told the 
board that Hosmer plans to 
operate the business in the 
same manner as it has been 
run, and to keep the part time 
employees already there. He 
said he would also keep the 
name. Hosmer will manage 
the store with his wife, Atty. 
Faust said. 

Police Captain Paul Nestor 
told the board that Hosmer 
had spoken to him about his 



plans and that a police check 
showed Hosmer has no 
previous police record. 

Although Hosmer has no 
prior experience in the liquor 
business, he told the board he 
had worked in management 
and in sales for many years. 

Building Commissioner 
Matthias Mulvey noted that 



the store has had past 
problems with selling to 
minors. Police Chief Francis 
Finn told Hosmer the City is 
"very strict" on this issue. 

Finn also advised Hosmer 
to meet with City Liquor 
Inspector Sgt. Richard 
Laracy to go over the various 
city regulations. 



W. Quincy Facility 
Plan Update Set 



A public hearing in the 
update to the Facility Plan for 
West Quincy was scheduled 
for last night (Wednesday) at 
the North Quincy High 
School auditorium, 316 
Hancock St. at 7:30 p.m. 

The City of Quincy has 
proposed an update to the 



Facility Plan and Related 
Environmental Studies which 
address the alleviation of 
sewage disposal problems in 
West Quincy. 

All interested citizens are 
invited to attend and public 
comment is encouraged. 



Rep. Michael W. Morrissey 
(D-Quincy) has requested 
that Inspector General Joseph 
Barresi investigate the legality 
of the 10-year lease signed by 
the Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority at the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Morrissey estimates the 
cost of the lease at "over $2 
million per year," or $20 
million in total. 

Citing that the cost of the 10 
year lease is close to the cost of 
renovating the MWRA office 
building at the Quincy 
Shipyard, Morrissey ques- 
tioned the wisdom of the 
agreement. 



"To invest this much money 
in a 10 year lease demon- 
strates that the MWRA is not 
acting in the best interest of 
the ratepayers, for a couple of 
million dollars more they 
could be in an office building 
for life," said Morrissey. 

Morrissey also questioned 
why the lease was not put out 
to public bid. 

"It is no secret that there is a 
surplus of office space in the 
Boston area. How do we 
know that the MWRA could 
not have saved millions of 
dollars by going out to public 
bid. Whether they are 



required to by law or not, it 
makes good business sense to 
solicit bids before committing 
yourself to a 10 year lease at a 
cost of millions of dollars a 
year." 

Morrissey said he and other 
legislators have refiled 
legislation that would require ' 
the MWRA to relocate to the 
Quincy Shipyard but he 
doesn't expect it to pass until a 
new governor is elected. The 
legislation was passed in 1989 
and received the support of 
too state representatives and 
the majority of the Senate, but 
was vetoed by Governor 
Dukakis. 



Kolson To Meet With Constituents 



Ward 1 Councillor Peter 
Koison announces he will 
meet regularly with 

constituents on the second 



Thursday of every month, 
beginning today, from 7 to 9 
p.m. at the Houghs Neck 
Community Center, 1 193 Sea 
St. 



Notification will be 
released in the near future 
regarding constituent hours at 
other neighborhood centers. 




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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, 1990 



t 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

Th« Ouincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Ouincy, Mass. 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr., Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 
Jane C. Arena, Assistant Editor 

25« per copy, $11.00 per year by mail in Ouincy 
$12.00 per year by mail outside Ouincy, $15.00 out of state 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass. 

Postmaster: Send address change to: 
The Ouincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Ouincy, Mass. 02169 



L 



The Ouincy Sun assumM no financial responsibility for 
typographical arrora in advenisaments but will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs. 



'Am:- 



n4 



Readers Forum 

Thanks McCauley, 

Staff I^oi* Assisting 

Farmers' Market 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

On behalf of the Quincy 
Farmers' Market I wish to 
thank Mayor McCauiey and 
his administrative staff, Peter 
Kcniley, Arthur Foley and 
Roberta Fitzgerald from the 
Planning and Community 
Development for the 
assistance they have given to, 
the Quincy Farmers' Market 
during the past eight years. 

Quincy Farmers' Market is 
an open-air market operating 
during the summer months at 
the John Hancock Parking 
Lot. Today's consumers are 
highly nutrition and health 
conscious customers, and 
they are looking for 
wholesome produce. Farmers' 
Market is a convenient place 
to buy directly from the 
grower, the best in fresh, 
locally-grown produce at a 
reasonable price without 
fancy packaging. Buying 
locally grown produce during 
the growing season makes 
good nutritional, as well as, 
economic sense. 

During the past summer 
9,380 dollars worth of 
Massachusetts Farmers' 
Market Coupons were 



distributed among the 
nutritionally-at-risk persons 
which were redeemed for 
fresh produce at the Quincy 
Farmers' Market. 

For a farmer or a market 
gardener it provides a unique 
direct-to-the-buyer outlet for 
his fine produce, and helps 
farmers retain land for open 
space and on tax roles. 

The City of Quincy 
provides space at the 
Hancock Parking Lot for the 
farmers market purpose. 
When the parking lot was 
modified and the meters 
removed, the Mayor's Office 
graciously made the 
arrangements with the 
Parking Garage Operators to 
validate the farmers' market 
customers' parking fee. This is 
a valuable contribution to the 
market. 

Quincy Farmers' Market is 
looking forward to continuing 
its operation under our new 
administration and to 
bringing Massachusetts 
grown. . .and fresher produce 
to the citizens of Quincy. 

Anneli Johnson 

Quincy Farmers' Market 

36 Garfield St. 




The sun is 330,330 times larger than the earth. 




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Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



His Favorite Mayor 





MclNTYRE 

great hindsight. 



You might say that City Clerk John Giilis is the man 
who officially put seven mayors in office. 

When James Sheets raised his 
right hand Jan. 2 he was the seventh 
mayor to take his oath from Giilis. 
The first -- Amelio Delia Chicsa - 
was sworn in by Giilis in I960 - 30 
years ago. 

After Delia Chiesa in order came: 
James Mclntyre. Walter Hannon. GILLIS 

Joseph LaRaia. Arthur lobin and Francis McCauiey. 
Giilis has been clerk since 1959 and was assistant 
clerk for two years before that. He succeeded the late 
Alan Cole. 

Does Giilis have a personal favorite among the seven 
mayor s hej ias sworn in? He does: Mclntyre. 

"He had compassion, intelligence 
and understood government," says 
Giilis. "He really understood 
government and what made it tick. 
He knew how to get things done ~ 
when to stop, when to go. His timing 
was always good." 

While a lot of political figures have 
Giilis says Mclntyre had great 
foresight. 
"It came natural with him," says Giilis. 
He recalls when the original plans were put together 
for the Lincoln Hancock School, they did not include 
an indoor swimming pool. 

"Mclntyre said it should have a pool so that 
youngsters in that area could swim safely there instead 
of in dangerous water filled quarries." 

And residents throughout the city could swim there, 
too. 

Giilis also recalls the coming of the MBTA and how 
Mclntyre in the triple role of mayor - state senator ~ 
and chairman of the Transportation Committee - had 
the clout to get the best deal for Quincy. 

"He virtually laid out the Red Line," smiles (Jillis. 
Mclntyre, among other things, was able to get the 
planned North Quincy station relocated by }5() feet 
which prevented a long-term construction snag and 
saved 22 North Quincy homes from demolition. 

Giilis has another reason to be fond of Mclntyre who 
was a close friend of his: 

"He was a fairly weahhy man but he was for the little 
people. He wanted to do things for them. He was a fine 
human being. 

Giilis does pretty well in the human being department 
himself. 

He has quietly slipped a lot of money into the hands 
of those down on their luck who come to City Hall 
knowing that "Johnny (iillis is my friend." 

And he has found jobs for some. 

But today it is getting tougher to find those jobs. 

"A lot of craftsmen ~ plumbers and electricians- are 
in looking for work," he says. "About four or five a day. 

"Things are bad. And it looks like they will get a 1. t 





BURKE 



worse. I'm afraid we're going to see city layoffs before 
things get better." 

Giilis, who is 63, has no plans for retirement. He 
doesn't have to retire until seven years from now when 
he reaches age 70. 

And that will make a lot of people feel older. 
Especially those who remember him with a crew cut 
back in the I950's. 

"I feel good," he says. "I enjoy my work. I'll hang in 
there, the good Lord willing." 

D 
CITY HALL LONGEVITY honors also 
Assistant City Clerk Tom Burke who 
has been there with the same seven 
mayors. Burke succeeded Giilis as 
assistant clerk when GiPis became 
clerk. 

And. City Auditor Robert Foy has 
been around since 1972 and five 
m£ 

He came in with Hannon as city 
treasurer and tax collector. 

Called "the great survivor," he was 
kept on by LaRaia who had been on 
the political warpath with Hannon 
And Tobin who had his own battle 
royal with LaRaia reappointed Ko\ 
when he became mayor. 

McCauiey also reappointed him but alter six months 
he became city auditor appointed by the City Council 
on three year terms. 

Foy, who is popular and efficient probably can keep 
the job as long as he wants it. 

The City Council also knows a good man when they 
see one. 

n 

SOMEONE OUT THERE has th^ he;^rtfelt thanks 
of School Committeewoman Mary 
Collins. Collins was heartbroken 
over the weekend when Chelsea, her 
pet Collie, who had never strayed 
from the Lansdowne St., .Squanlum 
area, vanished. ^^ 

COLLINS 

Collins searched the neighborhood and the marshes 
where Chelsea usually plays. No sign ol her. 

Finally, she called the Quincy Police Department to 
ask the question dog owners dread to ask: "Have \oii 
had any reports of a dog being struck by a car'.*" 

"No," the oflicer replied. " Ihc only report we ha\c 
had is from someone who reported a Collie thai 
appeared to be lost at Squantum Marina." 

Collins quickly drove to the Marina and there was 
Chelsea sitting on the boardwalk. Happy reunion. 

"I don't know who called the police station to make- 
that lost dog report but I would like to sa\ 'thank \()u. 
from the bottom of my heart whoever you are.'" 




Real Estate Tax Delinquents 
Face Foreclosure Action 



(Cont'd J rom Page I) 

the city has to borrow, the 
more it saves on interest. 

"If we don't have the money 
in our cash flow, we have to 
borrow and then pay interest. 
The money we pay in interest 
could be used for other 
things," Childs said. 

In the three and a half years 
Childs has been in charge of 
the bills, this is the earliest the 
list has been compiled. He 
credits the continued 



efficiency of the department's 
computer system. 

Between 1983 and 1985, it 
took the city 800 days to 
prepare the tax titles. This 
year, it took 236 days, Childs 
said, adding he wanted to get 
them out before the tax 
season. 

"The sooner you take the 
action, the more you're going 
to have," he said, adding, "A 
lot of people will hang on until 
they absolutely have to pay." 



The real estate payment 
notice procedure is a multi- 
step process. 

First, the formal bill is 
mailed out. If left unpaid, a 
second notice, or demand, is 
sent out which adds a $5 
charge and 1 4 percent accrued 
interest to the original bill. 

Next, a final notice is 
mailed to delinquent 
taxpayers. This notice has no 
additional fee but includes the 
demand charge and addition- 
al interest. 



RUBBISH COLLECTION FOR THE 
CITY OF QUINCY WILL BE ONE 
DAY LATE NEXT WEEK DUE TO 
MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY! 

Thursday collectiomvill be made on Friday and 
so on Friday collection will be completed on 
Saturday. This applies to all routes 




Advertising delinquent 
taxpayers follows stating the 
official deadline for tax 
payment. After the deadline 
which this year is Jan. 25. 
foreclosure can begin. 

Childs said taxpayers can 
avoid foreclosure by paying 
their bills as soon as possible. 
He said a fee would be 
assessed to those who pay 
after the Jan. 25th deadline. 

Furthermore, interest on 
the tax bill increases after the 
deadline, from 14 percent 
before it goes into tax title and 
16 percent after. 

Childs said he hopes all 
delinquent taxpayers come 
forward with payment soon. 
He noted the frequent notices 
and advertising help the city's 
collection efforts. 

"The sooner you send out a 
notice, the better the 
response. The sooner you can 
start the collection process, 
the better off you arc," Childs 
said. 



ThHrsday, January II, t9H Qidacy Sm Page 5 



Clara Yeomans Quincy 
Sun 'Citizen Of Year' 



(Cont'd from Page I) 

believe in." 

And, she recalls: 

"As a city kid (in Chelsea) I 
hardly saw a tree. When I was 
eight years old I got sick and 
spent the summer on a farm in 
Groton. 

"It was really the first green 
grass 1 saw and I Just never got 
over it. I loved every blade of 
it. 1 guess I am some kind of a 
nut, but harmless and kind of 
useful." 

Mrs. Yeomans was a 
charter member of the Quincy 
Conservation Commission 
established during the 
administration of Mayor 
Walter Hannon in the early 
1970's. 

She served 15 years on that 
commission, eight as a 
member and seven as 
executive secretary. The latter 
job became a casualty of 
Prop. V/i. 

Bosworth also congratulated 
the other 36 nominees. 

"Again this year we had 
many outstanding nominees," 
he said. "To be nominated is 
an honor in itself because the 
nominations are made by 
those from the community." 

Mrs. Yeomans will be 
honored at a reception to be 
hosted by The Sun in March 
at the Quincy Sons of Italy 
Social Center. 

Mrs. Yeomans was a 
member of the Five Year 
Open Space Planning 
Committee. The plan was to 
be submitted to the state but 
somehow was not. 

Mrs. Yeomans savs she will 




QllNCY StN "Citizen of the Year" Award selection committee discusses 39 nominees before 
selecting environmentalist Clara Yuemans as this year's recipient. Committee members include, 
clockwise from foreground. School Cummitteewoman Mary Collins, Sen. Paul Harold, Sun 
Editor Robert Bosworth, Ralph Yohe, executive director of the South Shore YMCA; Rev. 
Sheldon Bennett, minister United Pint Parish Church; Alicia Coletti, assistant director of 
Personnel Quincy Public Schools; John DeCarli, past president of Quincy Lodge Sons of Italy; 
Joseph Doran, president of North Quincy Business and Professional Association; Martin 
Finnegan, Quincy school athletic director and last year's award recipient; and Sun Publisher 
Henry Bosworth. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



ask new Mayor James Sheets 
to forward it to the state for 
possible funding. 

A member of Save Our 
Shores for 29 years and 
president the past four, she 
says: 

"We will be phasing S.O.S. 
out because its main goal was 
to preserve the Boston 
Harbor Islands for recrea- 



tional purposes. That is now 
in the process. Our work is 
just about done." 

Mrs. Yeoman's husband, 
Frank, died in 1982. Their two 
children are Frank Yeomans, 
a psychiatrist in New York 
and a daughter, Ann, a 
coordinator for affordable 
housing for the poor in 
Brooklyn. 



In the 1970's Ann, a rabid 
baseball fan, arranged to have 
minority youth teams from 
Brooklyn visit and play 
Quincy youth teams, the 
players staying at Quincy 
homes. This was done with 
the aid of Mrs. Yeomans and 
the late Richard Koch, 
executive director of the 
Quincy Park and Recreation 
Board. 



36 Other Nominees 



There were 36 other 
nominees for this year's 
Quincy Sun "Citizen of the 
Year." 

They are, in alphabetical 
order, with a comment 
excerpt from their nomina- 
tion: 

• Deborah Adelberg: 
After discovering a fire in a 
dumpster at Pagnano Towers 
which houses 156 people, she 
informed a resident who in 
turn called the fire 
department. The fire was then 
extinguished. 

• George Alcott, for his 
charitable endeavors as a 
scout master and member of 
the Nickerson American 
Legion Post and Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. 

• Bruce Ayers, for 
assisting the handicapped and 
being a "Big Brother" figure 
for many handicapped people 
in the community. 

• Trudy Buckley, long- 
time Quincy community 
activist and chairwoman of 
the Quincy Hospital Board of 
Managers, the first woman 
ever elected to that post. 



• Edward Cook, volun- 
teer member of Quincy Civil 
Defense since 1977 as 
assistant shelter director of 
the shelter program. Also 
active in the Italian Home for 
Children. 

• Rev. M. Alicia Corea, 
co-pastor Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church for 
performing services for the 
elderly, youth groups and 
other community work. 

• John Joseph Edward 
Dean, a concerned Quincy 
resident who was active in the 
Quincy Chamber of Com- 
merce, now the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 

• Dr. Edward Fitzgerald, 
for caring about his patients 
first and devoting time to the 
sick and needy. 

• Michael Gibbons, 
always helping his neighbors. 

• The late Christopher 
Kennedy, for tirelessly and 
generously giving his time and 
energy to Quincy in the area 
of education and other causes 
including the Parks and 
Recreation Board. "He 
helped make Quincy a better 



place." 

• Gregory Hanley, for 

recently opening his own 
business and being a role 
model for the youth of 
Germantown. "He has taken 
kids with low self-confidence 
and turned them around to 
believe in themselves and their 
abilities." 

• Officer Robert Hanna, 
Quincy Police Department, 
for his outstanding devotion 
and timeless efforts in 
protecting all citizens of 
Quincy from crime, particu- 
larly senior citizens and 
children. 

• Daniel Holland, a new 
Quincy resident who has 
shown exceptional merit and 
values as a citizen including 
valiant, at times heroic, civic 
spirit and uncompromising 
work ethic. 

• Frank Kearns, former 
Silver Hair Senator, 
outstanding advocate for the 
elderly, poor and handi- 
capped. 

• Betty Keith, volunteer 
37 years at Quincy Hospital 
who has compiled some 



25,000 hours of service there. 
"Always helpful and 
considerate in and out of 
hospital." 

• Robert LaFleur, Graves 
Registration Officer for 
Quincy veterans. Longtime 
advocate of veteran affairs 
who "gives more than 100 
percent to people around 
him." 

• Manet Community 
Health Center for serving 
South Shore residents for 10 
years. "They are caring 
professionals." 

• Former Mayor Francis 
X. McCauley for epitomizing 
these high ideals as a 
politician: honesty, integrity, 
old-fashioned work ethic and 
a deep concern for "the 
overburdened taxpayer." 

• Joseph McConville for 
his years of public service as a 
member and chairman of the 
Quincy Planning Board and 
his dedication to the youth of 
Quincy as a skating 
instructor. 

• John McDuff, the 
"father of the Quincy Animal 

(Cont'd on I'aid- 8) 




>■ 'I 



1!? 






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Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



^r; 



Shipyard Eyes 

Super Carrier 

Contract 



A delegation from the Quincy Shipbuilding 
Committee returned from Washington optimistic that 
the Fore River Shipyard will receive a multi-million 
dollar contract to build the third Forrestal-class super 
attack carrier. i«Bi««««iBB^i^i^ 

House Speaker Joseph W. 
Martin (R-Mass) predicted 
that a "reasonable bid" would 
bring Quincy the contract 

and Cong. Richard B. 

Wigglesworth (R-Milton) said ^■■■"^'■'■^^■^^" 
he believed the award would not be made on a "sheer 
dollars and cents basis." 

Members of the delegation said they were heartened 
by a promise from Presidential Assistant Sherman 
Adams that a "fair decision" would be made in 
awarding the contract. 

The delegation included City Manager William J. 
Deegan, Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa, George A. Daly 
Jr., chairman of the Quincy Shipbuilding Committee, 
and Donald Edmonston, president of Local 5 of the 
Shipbuilders Union. 

Meanwhile, the Yard obtained a half million dollars 
contract to build two digej.ters for the Great Northern 



Jan. 11-17 

1954 

36 Years Ago 



Paper Co. of East Millinocket, Maine. 

STORM CONTROVERSY 

A two-day snow storm, described as the worst in 
some time, deposited 1 2 inches of snow on Quincy and 
evoked a split on the City Council over the quality of 
snow removal. 

"An extremely poor job," said Councillor Carl W. 
Anderson. 

"A very good job," said Councillor Edna B. Austin. "I 
haven't had a single complaint." 

Good or bad. Public Works Commissioner Charles 
R. Herbert estimated that the cost of snow removal 
might go over $40,000, including the cost of hiring extra 
equipment and labor. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

City Council Chairman Edna B. Austin became the 
city's first woman acting mayor while Mayor Delia 
Chiesa was out of town ... St. Ann's Parish, Wollaston, 
acquired 72,000 square feet of land at the corner of 
Hancock St. and Greenleaf Place as the possible site of a 
youth recreation center ... Pvt. Lucian G. Brown of 200 
Quincy Ave., left for eight weeks of basic training at 
Fort Dix, N.J. ... Lamb chops were 49 cents a pound at 
the Capitol Supermarket, 1508 Hancock St... Jack 
Downey won the 1000 and Tom Greland the shot put 
but North Quincy's track team bowed to Somerville, 5 - 
20, in a Met Track League meet ... Dr. Arthur Trott of 
Wollaston, orthopedic surgeon at Chelsea Naval 
Hospital, spoke on polio to the Beechwood Knoll PTA 
... Capt. Anthony Zabolosku of 7 Lawrence St., Quincy 
Point, was given a plawue by the Commodores Club of 
America for his June rescue of 12 passengers from the 
burning pleasure fishing boat Madeline in Nantasket 
Roads ... Rev. Jorma Nannero, a former assistant 
chaplain in the Finnish armed forces, was installed as 
pastor of the West Quincy Congregational Church ... 
"Jack Slade," starring Mark Stevens and Dorothy 
Maguire, and "Private Eyes" with Leo Gorcey and the 
Bowery Boys, was playing at the Art Theater ... Mrs. 
Mary Rourke of Cambridge was named rent specialist 
for the Quincy Rent Control Board at a salary of $3,900 
... Marjorie Faye Leavitt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Leavitt of 26 Keyes St, Quincy Point, disclosed 
that she and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill 
had exchanged cards on their birthday, Nov. 30 ... 
Marjorie is 6, Churchill 76 ... Jim Colclough's clutch 
shooting led the Quincy J V basketball team to a 65-55 
victory over Somerville ... Leon F. Hallett of 69 Henry 
St., Norfolk Downs saw his first snow in 40 years since 
his return to Quincy from government service in 
Panama ... Hasting's Broadcasting Orchestra played for 
the mid-winter social of the Great Hill Association in 
the Adams Shore Clubhouse ... Guy F. Faiella of 166 
South St., Quincy Point, Ward 2 Republican chairman, 
was recuperating from eye surgery at the Mass Eye and 
Ear Infirmary ... Rep. Carter Lee (R-Quincy) was 
named House chairman of the Committee on Public 
Welfare ... City Manager Deegan said he will ask the 
City Council for $7,000 to complete exploratory 
excavation of the newly uncovered colonial blast 
furnace in West Quincy. 



Pat* * Quincy Sun Tkunday, January II, I9M 



Bank Of New England-South's 
Stocking Project A Success 



^All-You-Can-Eat' UCP 
Brunch At Quincy Sons Of Italy 



bank of New England- 
South's second annual 
"Stockings of Joy" project 
which provided Christmas 
stockings to area organiza- 
tions serving children and 
families over the holiday 
season "was a resounding 
success," announces Bank 
Executive Vice President 
Dana Gould. 

"Fifty-five Bank of New 
England-South offices 
throughout southeastern 
Massachusetts participated in 
the project which provided 
over 6,000 filled stockings to 
the needy," stated Mr. Gould. 
"We would like to thank our 
customers and employees for 
their enthusiastic response, 
and look forward to repeating 
the project next year." 

In addition to the filled 
stockings, many Bank of New 
England-South customers 
brought other gifts — from 
stuffed animals to wrapped 
toys — for distribution to 
needy children. Agencies 
which received the Holiday 
stockings in this area are; 
Father Bill's Place and 
Southwest Community 
Center, both in Quincy. 

The following Bank of New 
England-South branch offices 
in the Quincy region 
participated in the holiday 
project: Braintree (1 
Rockdale St.); Canton (95 
Washington St.); Norfolk 
(144 Main St.); Norwood (153 
Nahatan St.); Plainville (129 
South St.); Quincy (4 




The Quincy Sons of Italy 
Lodge No. 1295, 120 Quarry 
St. West Quincy, will sponsor 
an "All-You-Can-Eat 
Brunch" Sunday, Jan. 21 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

A $5 donation is requested 
and all proceeds will benefit 
United Cerebral Palsy. 

The brunch will be the 
South Shore event for the 
United Cerebral Palsy's 
"Star-a-Thon" (telehon) 
which will be broadcast li\L' 



on WCVB-TV Channel 5. 
Along with live television 
remotes, radio station WJDA 
in Quincy will broadcast live 
reports of the events 
scheduled during the brunch. 

More than 700,000 children 
and adults throughout the 
country are disabled by 
Cerebral Palsy. People with 
CP require life-long service. 

The Cerebral Palsy 
Association is the premier 
local health care agency in the 



Greater boston area that 
provides residential housing 
for the physically disabled. 

The Sons of Italy Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts 
raised $35,000 during last 
year's telethon. State 
President Angelo Furnari has 
set this year's goal at $50,000. 

For more information, 
contact Quincy Sons of Italy 
Special Events Chairman 
Denis Tardo at 471-7254. 



140 Residents In Who's Who 
Among High School Students 



STOCKINGS OF JOY ~ For the second consecutive year 55 
offices of the Bank of New En gland- South donated filled 
stockings to area needy organizations. The stockings were 
filled by bank customers and donated to Father Bill's Place 
and the Southwest Community Center in Quincy. From left 
are, Mary Jo Dion, Case Manager at Father Bill's Place, 
Rosemary Wahlberg, Executive Director of Quincy 
Community Action, and Gary Cappuccino, Branch Manager 
for Bank of New England's Quincy Center office. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charlen Flami) 



locations: 1495 Hancock St., 
415 Hancock St., 521 
Southern Artery, 20 Beale 
St.); Randolph (21 Memorial 



Parkway); South Weymouth 
(51 Pleasant St.); Walpole (2 
locations: 907 Main St.. 90 
Boston Providence Highway). 



Hospital Auxiliary Plans Tag Day 



A Tag Day will be held by 
the Quincy Hospital 

Auxiliary on Friday, Feb. 2, 
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 
Quincy Hospital. 



Awards will be made. 

The Auxiliary is expecting 
to provide three Non-Invasive 
Neo-Natal Blood Pressure 
Monitors to aid in the work of 
the Outpatient Department. 



Mildred E. Jacobs, Tag 
Day chairman, is being 

assisted by Esther Grossman 
and Ruth Dahlgren, co- 
chairmen. 



Positive Persuasion ITC Club Topic 



The Quincy ITC Club, 
formerly Toastmistress, will 
meet Wednesday, Jan. 17 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center, 12 
Hunt St., North Quincy. 

The club is starting the new 



year with a worksnop on 
techniques for positive 
persuasion. The workshop 
will be presented by Cecily 
Sanchez and Anita Trotter- 
Cox of the Necdham ITC 
Club. 
The Quincy ITC Club is a 



non-profit educational club. 
There are few membership 
openings. Visitors are 
welcome to attend the 
meetings. 

For more information, call 
328-0214. 



One hundred and forty 
Quincy residents are among 
those listed in the 23rd annual 
edition of Who's Who 
Among American High 
School Students, 1988-89. 

Who's Who, published by 
Educational Communica- 
tions, Inc., Lake Forest, 
Illinois, is the largest high 
school recognition publica- 
tion in the country. Students 
are nominated by high school 
principals and guidance 
counselors, national youth 
groups, churches or by the 
publishing company based 
upon students' performance 
in schoolarship award 
contests or extracurricular 
activities. 

Final selection is determin- 
ed on the basis of criteria 
which include high achieve- 
ment in academics and 
leadership in school activities, 
athletics or community 
service. Traditionally, 99 
percent of Who's Who 
students have a grade point 
average of B or better and 97 
percent are college bound. 

Those from Quincy are: 

Arlene Amo, Jason 
Baldock, Jeffrey Bell, Eileen 
Cahalane, William Chu, 
Donna Colby, Maureen 
Cully, Kerry DesRoche, 
Carmen Donoso, Mark 
Gunther, Ha Hue Huynh, 
Sharon Kavanagh, Linda 
Laitinen, Peter Lespasio, 
Peggy-Ann McMillen, 
Lauren Morgan, Crystal 
Nittinger, Erin O'Brien, 
Nicole Ormon, Jacqueline 



Potter, Cheri Purves. 
Cristine Quiton, Kim 
Rocottelli, Francine Rogers, 
Anthony Stafford, Lynne 
Swanson, Dora Tsang, Sergi 
Wassiliew. 

Sandra Beattie, King- 
Kwan Cheng, Julie Detwiler, 
George Duncan Jr., Shannon 
Evans, Kristin Fiacco, George 
Gavros, Jennifer George, 
Peter Au, Ellen Barrett, 
Richard Burns, David Chu, 
Jr, Christen Clarke, Julie 
Cox, Amy Czarnowski, Cara 
DiMattia, Marsha Goodman, 
Lesley Hart. 

Edward lorio, Alanna 
Keto, Nancy Laitinen, Alison 
McGowan, Jeffrey Mei, 
Deanna Nigro, Ellwood 
Nordstrom, Daniel O'Shea, 
Dale Parry, Cyndie Pruss- 
man, Brian Quigley, Robert 
Ricciarelli, Rebekah Rieder, 
Jennifer Rossi, Marie 
Straughn, Michael Tempesta, 
Cheryl Vickers, Kwong Kit 
Wong. 

Kipp Caldwell, Janet Daly, 
Thomas Duddy, Michael 
Dunning, James Ferrara, 
Sara Francis, Nelson Gee, 
James Glynn, Michael 
Grindlay, Brenda Hayduk, 
Robert Hegarty, Alison 
Hurley, Anna Kuczynski, 
Stacey MacLean, Tristen 
^■f a '■f rop'TOT! o . Maura 



Molly, 



McGlame, Susan 
Joseph Murphy. 

Patricia Nguyen, Anita 
Nurmenniemi, Alison 
Scanlon, Chun Kit To, 
Jennifer Whalen, Michael 
Yee, Robert Bassett, Billy 
Chan, Colleen Doyle, John 
Dumas, Daniel Flaherty, 
Brian Glennon, Christopher 
Hill, Aiman Janineh, Amy 
Kufert, Peter Liang, Michael 
McCormick, Lisa Mollomo, 
Fareeza Nazir, Tammy 
Paulson. 

Sherrin Quintiliani, Sean 
Vermette, Amy Wong, Janice 
Yu, Dana Gurwitch, Brian 
Hegarty, Stephen Howard, 
Timothy Kane, Samuel 
Kwan, Steven Manolakis, 
Charlene McCloskey, Gillian 
Metherall, Christopher 
Murphy, Gerard Neal, Jr., 
Tracey Nickerson, Meredith 
Rossi, Wayne Sit, Kaihy 
Watt, Jennifer White, Becky 
Zadig. 

Teresa Blasetti, Tram Dieu, 
Anne Driscoll, Julie 
Fitzgerald-Swan, Kerry 
Galvin, Regina Golden, Ngoc 
Hoang, George Kouvlis, 
William Lee, Jonathan 
MacDonald, Tong Meng, Tu 
Trinh My, Mai Mai Ng, 
Theresa Quinn, Eileen Ross, 
Cindy White, Chung Wong, 
David Ziolkowski. 



N.Q. Senior Citizens 
Card Party Thursday 



•The North Quincy Senior 
Citizens club will hold its 
regular card party today 



(Thursday) at I p.m. at the 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 





JEWELRY, GIFTS 



14 Kt. Wedding Bands 

Buy One-Get One FREE! 

All Styles available 

PHASE II 

Jewelry & Gifts 

136 1' Hancock Street 

Ouincy Square 472-6618 



CASSANDRA'S 

Custom Designers 

of 

Fine Jewelry 

2.13 Hridgc Si. Ric }\ 

\. Wcvmouih .14<>-5355 



CATERING 



"Party Platters" 
barry's/ 

/deli 

21 BMie St 
Wollaston 
471- 



MUSIC 



Say 

"I LOVE YOU TRULY" 
with 

BARON HUGO 
AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

698-9047 or 482-4550 



LIMOUSINES 



HAWKES 
LIMOUSINE 

WEDDINGS 
Starting atM10.o° 

331-0405 



RECEPTION HALLS 



PHOTOGRAPHER ■ BRIDAL FASHIONS 



Photography 

iintire's 



Mci 



Studio 

679 Hancock Street. Ouincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-€888 



PRINTING 



CHURCH PROGRAMS 

Your Pre-prlnted Covers 

or Custonn Made 

THE QUINCY SUN 

1372 Hancock St , 

Ouincy Square 

471-S100 



Creative Bridals 

54 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

472-7670 

Hours Tues, Wed. Thurs, 10-9 
*^C Fri & Sat 10-5 VISA 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



.1& i^- 






I 



"Have an 
affair with 
Amelia" . 

Amelia's in Quincy. W 
overlooks Manna Bay. ^ 
with a panoramic view of g 
the Boston skyline This P 
spacious 120 seat 
function room has an 
extensive menu at 
affordable prices This is 
an open invitation to join 
us for that special 
reception. 

Amelia Is 



t 




FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

Telephone 471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



QUINTREE 
FLORIST 

Specializing in Fresh & Silks 

Open 7 days and 6 nigriis 
444 Quincy Ave , Braintree 

848-9075 



Quint's 
Florists 



761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



Barry's 
Flower Shop 

Flowers lor all occasions 

337-0970 

1000 Washington Street 

Braintree. MA 




Thur«d«y, January II, 1990 Qulncy Sun Page 7 




JOANNE M. SMITH and GEORGE P. WILLIAMS 

(George If atson Studio) 

Joanne Smith Engaged 
To George Williams 



Mrs. Susan P. Smith and 
Mr. Walter J. Smith of 
Maryland Heights, Mo., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, JoAnne M. 
Smith, of Maryland Heights, 
to George P. Williams, of St. 
Louis, Mo. 

He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles H. Williams of 
Pensacola, Fla. 

Miss Smith is the 
granddaughter of Mrs. Anne 
McCloskey and 'he late 



Francis X. McCloskey of 
Quincy and Mr. and Mrs. 
Forrest G. Smith of 
Wollaston. 

Miss Smith is a 1986 
graduate of Pattonville High 
School in Missouri. 

Mr. Williams is a 1984 
graduate of Pine Forest High 
School in Pensacola. 

A May wedding is planned. 
The couple plan to reside in 
St. Louis. 



Maureen Duggan Engaged 
To Brian Redmond 



The engagement of 
Maureen S. Duggan to Brian 
H. Redmond of Rochester, 
N.Y. is announced b> her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James 
F. Duggan of Quincy. 

Her fiance is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold J. Redmond 
of Rochester. 

Miss Duggan graduated 
from Quincy High School, the 
College of the Holy Cross, 
Worcester, and Suffolk 
University Law School, 
Boston. She is emnloved by 



Lawyers Cooperative 
Publishing Co., Rochester. 

Mr. Redmond is a graduate 
of Cardinal Mooney High 
School in Rochester, St. 
Bonaventure University at 
Olean, N.Y., and Cornell 
University Law School, 
Ithaca, N.Y. He, too, is 
employed by Lawyers 
Cooperative Publishing 
Company. 

A spring wedding is 
planned. 



Silent Auction For 
United Quincy Alliance 



A Silent Auction will be 
held by the United Quincy 
Alliance at United First 
Parish Church, Quincy,- 
Wednesday, Jan. 17, at 1 p.m. 
in the Parish Hall. 



Hostesses for the light 
luncheon will be Mary Vallier 
and Doris Lunn. 

Members are asked to bring 
friends. 



Meat Drawing At Morrissette 



A meat drawing will be held 
at Morrissette Legion Post, 54 
Miller St., West Quincy, 
Saturday, Jan. 13 at 3 p.m. 

Proceeds will help support 
the scholarship fund for high 
school students. Admission is 

f GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



free. 



Social 




MR. and MRS. SCOTT D. HAMPTON 



(Tiiin If illoii- Siiidiol 



Lynda Rice Married 
To Scott Hampton 



Lynda L. Rice, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Rice 
of Quincy, and Scott D. 
Hampton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Hampton of 
Minis, were married recently 
in a double ring candlelight 
ceremony at the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church. 

Suzanne Scola of Quincy, 
was the maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Kathy 
Larocco of Melrose, Jeannine 
McLaughlin of Quincy, Amy 
Moquin of Weymouth and 
Jennie Moquin of South 
Weymouth. Kristin Rice was 
flower girl. 

Steven Larocco of Melrose 
was best man. Ushers 



included Robert Kane of 
Hingham, Rich Maccini of 
Melrose, Richard Landers of 
Wellesley and David Fulton 
of Lowell. 

A reception was held at the 
Canoe Club, West Bridgewater. 

After a wedding trip to 
Mystic, Conn, and Dorset, 
Vermont, the couple are living 
in Millis. 

The bride, a Quincy High 
School graduate, is a senior 
secretary at State Street Bank. 

The bridegroom, a 
graduate of Tri-County 
Vocational Technical High 
School in Franklin, is a 
supervisor at Sir Speedy 
Printing, Wellesley. 



Slide Show For 
Wollaston Garden Club 



Sylvia Carlson will present 
a slide show for the Wollaston 
Garden Club as its program 
on Thursday, Jan. 18, at 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church, 48 Winthrop Ave., 
Wollaston, starting at 12 
noon. 

The floral arrangement will 



be by Evelyn McCarthy. 
Hostess for the day will be 
Alice Zinkus. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERSM6 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 



9 



! MOBILE 



SERVICE 



AUT0-H0MEBU8INESS ' 
OUOBOITS INSTALLED] 
LOCKS REKEYED 
DOOR CLOSERS 
PANIC HARDWARE 
AUTO KEYS FIHED 




HIS M3 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

PERM SPECIAL ^ 

UNIPERM ' 



GOLDWELL . 

FOAM PERM '55^" ' 

All specials perlormed by one ol Russells staff 



Includes Shampoo 



Lohg hair 
cn slightly highe 
Complete 




LORRIE A. QLINN and RICHARD P. FENNELL 

(Mclntire'$ Studio) 

Lorrie Quinn Engaged 
To Richard Fennell 



Mrs. Lorraine M. Quinn of 
Quincy announces the 
engagement of her daughter, 
Lorrie Quinn to Richard 
Fennell, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald Fennell of Roslin- 
dale. 

Miss Quinn is also the 
daughter of the late Thomas 
A. Quinn of Quincy. A 
graduate of North Quincy 



High School, Miss Quinn is 
employed with the North 
American Reinsurance 
Corporation. 

Mr. Fennell is a graduate of 
Jamaica Plain High School 
and is employed by the City of 
Boston. 

A May wedding is being 
planned. 



Nite Owls Dance Saturday 



The Nite Owls Senior 
Citizens will hold a dance 
Saturday, Jan. 13, from 7 to 
10 p.m. at the Drop-In 
Center, 24 High School Ave., 



Quincy. 

There will be live music, 
and all are welcome. A 
donation of $2.50 may be paid 
at the door. 



JJULJ JJAIa^I*I^Ia^IJUIa J^JUI^JL^J■.!a.Ia*^U!a^^ 





Winfield 
Gift Emporiutn 

Formerly the 

l^infield House Restaurant 



Christmas Sale Now On! 
thru Jan. 31 «t 

Open 7 Days A /eek 
IdOOA.M. - 10: P.M. 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



?'YVj>rp>wO'TiO'TiO'Ti>?^^ 



mm^ 




^ ,^J€Hlc/l (^f ^^^i 



^Itii^ie ^oiiieelue S 



Russell Edward s 



Complete 

slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 

for longer hair Sculptured Nails S56 

J Pedicures S22 

Body and Facial Waxing Available" 



i^/^///7 



V7/"/ ' '/// 



v/r^^ 



L>"''"i„on 



t^' 



(J 



sh" 



Senior 

Citizens 

Discount 






OPEN9-5DAILY WED THURS & FRI EVENINGS ^/^or^ 

Corner Hancock Chestnut * Maple Sis ' Maple St . Quincy 47^-|UbU 




Clossd Mondays 

Op«n Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 AM - 5:30 P M 



28 Greenwood Ave 



WollMlon 

4CfOU Imm irtC MB 



T"*^ 773-5266 



10 



VfSA.l 



^m 



nnPP" 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, 1990 




AT ANCHOR GIFT SHOP 

471-2558 

Winter Clearance 

25 to 50% Off 



36 Other Nominees 



319 Victoiy Rd. 
Quincy 



Marina Bay 
471-2558 



ENTRANCE - SCHOLARSHIP 
EXAMINATION 

For New Students Entering 9th & 10th Grades 
JANUARY 13 OR FEBRUARY 22, 1990 

NO FEE IS CHARGED FOR THIS EXAM 

Newman pSfi745 School 

245 Marlborough St., Boston, MA 02116 

COEDUCATION - GRADES 9-12 

FULL and PARTIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

to be awarded for the term beginning Sept. 10, 1990 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, SEE YOUR 

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR OR CALL 

THE NEWMAN SCHOOL (267-4530) 



(Cont'd from Page 5) 

Shelter," for his many years of 
work for animals here and for 
being an outspoken advocate 
for education and fiscal 
responsibility in government. 

• Mrs. Sheila Mclntyre 
for her charitable work with 
the homeless and needy and 
involvement in the organ 
donor's association. She is 
also a "great mom and 
grandmother." 

• William McKinley, a 
concerned and friendly 
neighbor who is always 
available for emergencies. He 
takes in mail and newspapers 
while neighbors are out. 

• John Mullaney for his 
"self-sacrificing devotion" to 
his family and community, 
even while he was ill. He was 
active in the Koch Club, 
Montclair Men's Club and 
founding director of the 
Quincy Little Loop Bowling 
League. 



• Maybelle Murray who 

helps people sick and healthy 
everyday. "Sick or healthy, 
she loves and cares for 
everybody." 

• The late Forrest I. Neal 
Jr., for his outstanding service 
to Quincy in many capacities, 
including chairman of the 
MBTA Advisory Board and 
member of the Quincy Rotary 
Club and Quincy Neighbor- 
hood Club. 

• Peter F. O'Connell, for 
his effort 'to become Quincy's 
mayor. "He knows his people 
and is a very nice person to 
meet." 

• Libbie Payne, a 
volunteer for Quincy 
Community Television who 
visited Washington, D.C. 
with other volunteers to 
produce a television program 
devoted to AIDS. 

• Jerry Perfetuo for his 
years of dedication to the 
youth of Quinry. As president 



of the Quincy High Football 
Parents Club, he has directed 
the raising of tens of 
thousands of dollars to 
support athletic programs. 

• Jane Reikard, for her 
concern and dedication as the 
city's executive secretary of 
the Rent Grievance Board. 
She does "an excellent job, 
honest, capable, always ready 
to help people and does her 
very l^st." 

• Steve Riley, for saving a 
young girl from drowning. 
"He gave her CPR and 
brought her back. Thanks to 
him she (had) her first 
Christmas with her parents." 

• Esther Sanger for her 
work as founder of the Quincy 
Crisis Center and Mary- 
Martha Learning Center in 
Hingham. "She helps the 
homeless, the elderly, single 
mothers and children— and 
many others." 

• Don Strong for his work 



with Elder Affairs, hospice, 
Beechwood Community Life 
Center and "anyone who 
needs him. A truly service- 
oriented man." 

• Loren Strout for his 
hard work and dedication in 
promoting tourism in Quincy. 
"He's been the 'guiding light' 
to tourists visiting Quincy." 

• Patricia Toland for her 
outstanding performance as 
Quincy's first woman City 
Council President, 1988-89. 

• Barry Welch, "a great 
coordinator and organizer of 
all ages from 9-90 as Quincy's 
Recreation Director. A man 
with a lot of patience." 

• George Zeiba, driver of 
the Thomas Crane library 
bookmobile. "George is very 
helpful to the elderly. He 
knows just the books we like 
and has them ready for us. 
The children also love him." 



Selection Panel — 



This year's Quincy Sun 
"Citizen of the Year" selection 
panel: 

Rev. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister United First Parish 
Unitarian Church. 

Alicia Coletti, assistant 
director of Personnel and 
Equal Opportunity coordina- 
tor for Quincy Public 
Schools. 

Mary Collins, Quincy 



School Committee member 
and Norfolk County 
commissioner. 

John DeCarIi, past 
president Quincy Lodge Sons 
of Italy. 

John "Jake" Comer, 
executive director of the 
Quincy Housing Authority 
and Past National Com- 
mander of the American 



Legion. 

Joseph Doran, president of 
the North Quincy Business 
and Professional Association 
and partner in Doran and 
Horrigan Insurance Agency. 

Martin Finnegan, Quincy 
Public Schools Athletic 
Director and immediate past 
recipient of The Quincy Sun 
"Citi/en of the Year" award. 



Paul Harold, state senator 
(D-Quincy). 

Ralph Yohe, executive 
director of the South Shore 
YMCA and vice president 
Quincy Kiwanis Club. 

The selection process was 
moderated by Sun Publisher 
Henry Bosworth and Sun 
Editor Robert Bosworth. 



Good Idea! 



All of your Christmas pictures this and past years 

on one video tape 

Add Title and Music Free! 



All work done o n premises 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
472-7131 



MWRA, Quincy DPW Inspect 
Squantum Sewer System 



The Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority and the 
Quincy Department of Public 
Works have begun a sewer 
inspection program in the 
Squantum area of Quincy to 
help determine the impact of 
the tide on Squantum's sewer 
lines. 

MWRA Executive Director 
Paul F. Levy said, "We are 
very pleased to be working 
with the Quincy DPW to 
solve this problem. Clean 
water discharges to the sewer 
system are an unnecessary 
expense for the community 
and the entire MWRA sewer 



system. By making the 
necessary repairs now, the 
City can avoid costly 
problems later." 

The MWRA has completed 
metering of the sewer line 
during both high and low 
tides. Approximately 2,000 
feet of local sewer line will 
now be inspected with a 
special television camera 
designed to detect breaks and 
cracks in the system. 

The MWRA has used this 
camera as part of its program 
to reduce the volume of clean 
water discharges into the 
sewer system and will help 



member communities inspect 
their pipes for similar 
problems. 

David Cohen, Quincy's 
DPW Commissioner said, "I 
am happy to have been 
involved in a project where 

the city and the MWRA have 
been able to work together 
cooperatively. The study is an 
important step towards 
resolving the significant 
problem of inflow and 
infiltration that the city would 
not have been able to 
undertake on its own at this 
point in time." 



Joseph Innello On Dean's List 



Joseph M. Innello of West 
Quincy has been named to the 
Dean's List at Stonehill 
College, North Easton. 



DJERF CHRISTIAN CHILD 
DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

NURSERY SCHOOL 




WINTER OPENINGS 
NOW AVAILBLE 

For 3 year olds 

Tuesday and Thursday 

mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m. 

If interested, call 472-1247 

for furttier information 





BEECHWOOD 
MUSIC SCHOOL 

WINTER CLASSES 

• Private Lessons in all 

instruments 

• Free music theory class 

• Music for the very young 

• Exploring Music 

• Music theater class 

• Special Needs music class 

• Scholarships available 

• "Dancing Around The World" 

with Nikki Hu 
,• Piano keyboard class 

• Saturday lessons and classes 

now available 

BEECHWOOD COMMUNITY 
LIFE CENTER 

225 Fenno Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 



Students must achieve a 
G.P.A. of 3.2 or greater for 
this honor. 

Innello is a member of the 
class of 1991. is an accounting 



major as well as a football 
player for the Stonehill team. 
He is a 1987 graduate of 
Quincy High School. 



View the program nominated for a special 

award in the Health Division of the 

Massachusetts Community Television Contest. 

Medical Watch 

Thursday, January 18 

Thursday, January 25 

7:00 P.M. 

Community Television Channel 3 

Quincy-Milton-Randolph 

Cholesterol and Your Health 

Join host Libbie Payne and experts from Quincy 
Hospital for an informative discussion of choles- 
terol, its sources in the foods you eat, and its 
impact on your health. 

-& Quincy Hospital 



OCTV 




•iU*. 



uMiUyibi 



Thursday, January II, I99t Quincy Sun Page f 





QUINCY AFTER SCHOOL Day Care Director Sine Pounder, presents outgoing Mayor 
Francis McCauley with a book and a proclamation in appreciation for his support of the 
program. McCauley was also presented with letters written by some of the children in the 
program. Pounder referred to McCauley as "a friend of child care," and 'Ve expect to honor 
you for years to come by continuing to offer a high quality program for the children of Quincy's 
working people." 

(Quincy Sun photo by Charlet Flagg) 

Hospital Finance 

Committee To 

Meet Jan. 16 

The Board of Managers 
Finance Committee of 
Quincy Hospital will meet 
Tuesday, Jan. 1 6, at 6:30 p.m., 
followed at 7:30 p.m. by a 
Board of Managers meeting 
in the Education Center of the 
McCauley Building. 




Elementary 
School Menu 



Jan. 15-19 
Mon: NO SCHOOL 

Martin Luther King Day 

Tues: No Lunch 

Wed; Make your own 
meatball sandwich, green 
peas, fruit cup, milk. 

Thurs: Fish nuggets with 
tater tots, fresh carrot sticks, 
fresh baked wheat roil. milk. 

Fri: Cheese ravioli with 
Italian sauce, green beans, 
fresh baked Italian roll, fruit 
cup. milk. 



Secondary 
School Menu 



Jan. 15-19 

Mon: Martin Luther King 
Day 

Tues: Kish Nuggets with 
tater tots, fruit juice, fresh 
baked wheat roil. miik. 

Wed: Baked stultcd shells, 
with meatballs, fresh baked 
Italian roil, fresh apple, milk. 

Thurs: Barbeque chicken, 
sweet potato, corn, fresh 
baked wheat roll. milk. 

Fri: Breaded veal cutlet 
with mo77arella cheese 
topping, side order of curley 
rotini, fresh baked Italian roll, 
jello, milk. 



LOWEST 



PRICED 



PICTURE 



FRAMING 



KENNEDY 
STUDIOS 



1563 Hancock St 

773-6611 



SUMMER SUN 

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YOUR SKIN 

The hot summer sun can be brutal and dangerous to your 
skin. Blasting your skin with sun can lead to skin diseases. 

At Tanllne 2001 we care about your skin and understand 
how important it is to develop yourtan and maintain it over 
the seasons. 

Try our FREE Introductory session. 

Ask about It by calling: 

773-1611 

TANLINE 2001 . 

148 Parkingway, Quincy 

(next to the Registry) 



OOPS! 

WHA'JA SPILL? 




Bring us that party 
accident now! 
You know the one... 
the tomato sauce on 
the tablecloth... the 
gravy on your best 
dress...the spray of 
champagne on your 
draperies. 



The fresher the stain the better 
the cleaning, 

Quincy, Lakin Sq., 581 Adams St. - Wollaston, 624 Hancock St. 
So. Quincy, 320 Quincy Ave. - East Milton, 338 Granite Ave. 



TkpendaQe 



THE NUMBER ONE 



ueaqg^s 



Take a Creative Approach to Winter ... 
At the Quincy Art Association 



26 High School Avenue • Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

617-770-2482 

Winter Weekend Workshops 
Watercolor Workshop/ Peter Spataro 

Saturday. January 27, 10 a.m. -4 p.m. $25. Registration Deadline 1/13. 

New England Watercolor Society member Peter Spataro demonstrates his 

impressionistic style. Workshop focus on planning process, value studies and color 

use. List of materials supplied upon registration. Work from still life or photo. Bring a 

lunch. 

Interior Design-Window Treatments/Debby Saftler-Baron 

Saturday, March 3. 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. $6 

Window decorating specialist will discuss what's new in window fashions and offers 

decorating ideas. Demonstration on how to assemble a swag. Question and answer 

period for participants. Have exact window measurements available for related 

questions. 

Matte Workshop/ Lee McBurnie 

Sunday, March 18, I p.m. -4 p.m. $10 includes materials 

Well known watercolorist will discuss and instruct participants in the technique of 

matting artwork. Bring a picture or painting to matte no larger than 1 1" x 15". 

Ijindscape Oil Painting Workshop/ Pamela Fox 

Saturday. March 24, 9:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m. $25. Registration deadline 3/ 17 
National renowned Rockport artist will demonstrate her technique. Individual 
instruction provided. Bring own supplies and a lunch. 

Stenciled Floorcloths & Samplers/Kim Teirlynick, Textile Artist 

Saturday and Sunday, April 21 & 22. 12:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m. $20. Sign up by 4/15 
List of materials provided upon registration. Students will be introduced to traditional 
and non-traditional surface design techniques and experiment with stenciling and 
textural finishes to create a sampler or small floor cloth - no larger than 3' x 5'. Open to 
all levels of study and ability. Bring a lunch. 

Dried Flower Design Workshop/Dorrie Stearns 

Sunday, April 29, 2:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m. $10 fee includes flowers. Sign up by 3/27 
Create and complete a gracious framed flower design. Bring scissors, tweezers and a 5" x 
7" frame with glass. 

* EIGHT WEEK COURSES • 

MONDAYS: 

American Heirloom Orientals 7-9 p.m. S45/M SS5/NM, Allesandra Smith 

Create a beautiful heirloom rug from rare oriental patterns. In the Vestamayd method. 
Adapt colors to your decorating scheme. The rugs use 3-ply tapestry yarn of moth- 
proof 1009( virgin wool. Cost of materials to complete a small rug range from $75- 
$200 depending on size and color (budgeting of supplies is possible). 

TUESDAYS: 

Oil Painting 12:30-2:30 p.m. $55/M $65/NM, Frank Gerulskis 

Landscape-seascape: group and individual instruction provided. 

Oil Painting 7-9 p.m. S55/M S6S/NM, Frank Gerulskis 

Evening class - same as above 

Watercolor 7-9 p.m. $65/M $75/NM, Renee Marcou 

This class is for beginners and intermediate students. Focus will be in helping each 
student pursue basic techniques including washes, brush handling, color mixing, 
composition & value. 

WEDNESDAYS: 

Portraiture 10 a.m-12 p.m. S55/M S65/NM, Edwina Caci 

Any medium. Work from life (supply your own model) or from photo of people or pet. 

Oil/Pastel Painting 7-9 p.m. $55/M S65/NM, Helen Shaw 

Using the media of your choice, students will learn the steps to a finished painting. 

Watercolor 7-9 p.m. $55/M $65/NM, Douglas Orr 

TTiis course draws from Oriental & Western approaches in painting still lifes and 
landscapes. 

THURSDAYS: 

Rgure Drawing 7-9 p.m. $6S/M S7S/NM (tuition includes a SIO model fee), Ann Marie 

LaBolUta 

The figure drawing course is designed for beginners who are interested in exploring a 
variety of new media & developing a proficiency in figure drawing techniques. 

Basic Drawing 7-9 p.m. SSS/M S65/NM, Douglas Orr 

Students will describe objects within the picture space through the dynamic 
relationship between contour, form & depth. 

FRIDAYS: 

Watercolor 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $55/M $65/NM, Ue McBurnie 

Developing a painting with emphasis on the handling of the medium, composition & 
design. 

SATURDAYS: 

Youth Workshops, Douglas Orr - Grades 6-8 10 a.m.-12 p.m. S45 

The class will explore the elements of design including color, shape & pattern & learn 
how to depict 3 dimentional objects. 

Grades 9-12, 12 p.m.-2 p.m. S4S 

A course offering a strong foundation in design & perspective as well as emphasis on 
techniques and mediums to develop skills. 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 770-2482 
REGISTRATION FORM 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



TELEPHONE NUMBER. 



COURSE/ WORKSHOP 



Page If Qwlmej S«m Thmniay, Jaanry II. 1991 



Church News 



'Heroes For Our Time' Topic 
At First Parish Church 



The Amistad Affair' 
Sermon Topic At Bethany 



The worship service at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church on Sunday will focus 
on the continuing worldwide 
struggle for human rights and 
justice, in recognition of 
Martin Luther King Day. 

The sermon by Rev. J. 
William Arnold, senior 
minister, will deal with "The 
Armistad Affair," a most 
difficuh event in which justice 
was achieved and worked out 
in practical terms. 

Bethany, a congregation of 
the United Church of Christ, 
is located at the comer of 
Coddington and Spear Sts., m 
Quincy Center. There are two 
services, at 9 a.m. in the 
chapel and at 10 a.m. in the 
sanctuary. 



Lay scripture readers will 
be Jeanette Carnathan at the 
early service and Jean Ross at 
the sanctuary service. Rev. 
Elizabeth M. Upton, 
associate minister, will be the 
liturgist at both hours. 

At the sanctuary service the 
Chancel Choir, under the 
direction of organist Charles 
J. Blue, Sr., will sing as the 
anthem, "The Last Words of 
David" by Randall Thompson, 
and as the offertory Dawson's 
arrangement of "There Is a 
Balm in Gilead." 

The service will be 
broadcast hvc direct from 
Bethany's sanctuary at 10 
a.m. over radio station 
WJDA, ]:^oo kc. 



Sunday School will also be 
in session from 10 to 11 a.m. 
with classes for prc-school 
through 9th grade. Child care 
is also provided for babies and 
toddlers. 

Beginning at II a.m. 
immediately following the 
late service, a fellowship time 
with light refreshments will be 
held in the Allen Parlor. 

Individuals and families 
from the area are welcome to 
attend the worship and 
fellowship, and to enroll 
children in the Sunday 
School. 

For additional information 
about Bethany's programs 
and ministries contact the 
church office at 479-7300. 



'Baptism Of Jesus' Sermon Topic 
At Covenant Congregational 



This Sunday Dr. Sheldon 
W. Bennett, Minister, will 
dehver the sermon "Heroes 
For Our Time" during the 
10:30 a.m. service at United 
First Parish Church, 
Unitarian, in Quincy Center. 

The sermon will reflect not 
only on Martin Luther King. 
Jr.. but will consider how the 
lives of other men and women 
also can challenge each of us 
to confront destructive 
powers with justice, 
compa.vsion and the trans- 

The 
Wollaston 

"The Hopeless Task" will 
be the topic of Rev. Elden 
Zuem on Sunday, Jan. 14, at 
10 a.m. at Wollaston 
Congregational Church. 

Fran Martin will be reader. 
Ushers will be Patricia and 
Patrick DelVal. Mary and 
Paul Gifford will be greeters, 
and Andy Schwendenman 
will be acolyte. The Trustees 
will be hosts for the social 
hour. 



forming power of love. 

The Church Choir, 
Norman Corey, Director, will 
sing anthems by Galliard, and 
Mr. Corey will play organ 
works by Scheidt, Reger, and 
Boyce. Dan Metzel, trombon- 
ist, will be guest musician. 
Ushers will be Erma and 
Robert Rimmer, Mary Vallier 
will be the Greeter. 

Visitors are welcome and 
are invited to attend the social 
hour following the service. 
Julie Dzengeleski will be the 



Hostess. 

Bernadette Davidson will 
lead a program for the entire 
Church School on Dr. Martin 
Luther King; his life, his 
contribution to civil rights. 
and his legacy. 

Historic First Parish 
Church, "Church of the 
Presidents," is located 
opposite City Hall in Quincy 
Square. Child care is 
provided. Call 773-1290 for 
information. 



Hopeless Task' 
Congregational Topic 



At the Fellowship Hour 
following the service a group 
of persons will be learning and 
playing chess. Those 
interested may call Gus Oster 
at 471-3121. 

Sunday School and 
Nursery begin at 10 a.m. 
Confirmation Class for those 
in grade 8 and above will meet 
also on Sunday morning. A 
hymn sing will be held at 9:45 
am. 



Cub Scout Pack 14 and Boy 
Scout Troop 14 are accepting 
registrations for boys in 
grades I through 12. Future 
activities include a parent-son 
cake bake, flate-out camping, 

and several trips to local 
points of interest. 

More information may be 
obtained by calling Gus Oster 
at 471-3121. 



At the 10:45 a.m. worship 
service Sunday, at Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whit well and Granite Sts., 
Rev. Kathleen Graves, co- 
pastor with Rev. Kirk 
Johnson will preach. 

Her topic will be the 
baptism of Jesus by John the 
Baptist. 

The choir will be directed 
and accompanied on the 
organ by Richard Smith, 
Minister of Music. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for ages nursery 
through adult, will begin at 
9:30 a.m. During the service a 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner Southern Artery 
and_ Washington St Quincy 

OMrdi SdMtl 9:30 AJl 
NwAip at 10:30 AJL 

Rev Fred AtvKoo3-L^oii 
Rev Carol E AtAood-l.yon 

773-6424 (Child Care provided 
Call The Daily Bible 4/2-4434 



nursery is available for 
children age five and under. 
The attendant will be 
Florence Anderson. 

Immediately following the 
service, those registered for 
the winter weekend retreat 

will be leaving for New 
Hampshire. They will return 
Monday afternoon. There 
will be no coffee hour. 

The first week of January is 
Prayer Week with special 
services Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. 
at the home of David and 
Linda Day, Wednesday at 
6:30 p.m. at the church, and 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the 
parsonage. The theme is 
"Renewing Our Commitment 
to One Another." 

On Thursday, Jan. II at 
11:45 a.m. the Senior Adult 
Luncheon and program will 
be held. For a $1 donation 
soup and sandwich will be 
provided as well as a new 
year's program. On Friday, 



' 






cfimuL 

BAPTIST 
CHURCH 



b> 



65 Washington Street 

Quincy. iMA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

Sunday School 

Morning Worship 

Eve»iing Service 

Wed. Evenings 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 

10:45 AM: Solving Church Problems 
6:00 PM: The Task Before Us 

Affiliated with: Baptist Genoral Conference 
Northeast Baptist Conference 



9:30 am 

10:45 a.m. 

6:00 p m. 

7:00 p.m. 



Jan. 12 at 1:30 p.m. the 
Diaconate will meet. The 
Trustee Board will have a 
budget meeting at 7:30 p.m. at 
the church. 

Coming events include an 
all church work day Saturday, 
Jan. 20 from 9 a.m. Specific 
tasks will be assigned to the 
various groups of the church. 
Sunday, Jan. 28 is Pulpit 
Exchange Sunday in the First 
District. Speaker at Covenant 
Congregational will be Rev. 
Tom Nelson from the Cape 
Cod Covenant Church. Also 
on Jan. 28 the Annual 
Meeting will be held following 
a sandwich luncheon. 

During Lent a special 
Bonhoeffer Lecture series will 
be held at the church, given by 
the reknown Bonhoeffer 
scholar, Dr. F. Burton Nelson 
of Chicago. More details will 
be provided by the church 
office. 

For more information 
about any activities, call 479- 
5728. 



Robert Burns Celebration 
At Point Congregational 



Quincy Point Congrega 
tional Church will hold its 
fifth annual birthday 
celebration for Robert Burns, 
the Scottish poet, Friday, Jan. 
26. 

Many Quincy residents are 
familiar with the Robert 
Burns' statue at Burgin 
Parkway and Granite St., the 
funds for which were raised by 



residents of Scottish heritage. 
A social hour at 6:30 p.m. 
and roast beef dinner at 7:00 
p.m. will be followed by 
several traditional events that 
are part of a Robert Burns' 
celebration. These include the 
"piping in" of the haggis, the 
ode to the haggis, Scottish 
dancers and the singing of 
familiar Scotch songs. 



Everyone is encouraged to 
wear their clan tartan or 
something "plaid". 

Tickets at $10 per person 
may be obtained by calling the 
Quincy Point Church office 
(773-6424) or the Senior 
Citizens' Center at 1000 
Southern Artery. 

Glenn and Carol McGhee 
are chairpersons for the event. 



Guest Speaker At 
W. Quincy Congregational 



"Christianity and the New 
Age Movement" will be the 
subject of Brother Chi S. Kuo 
(Carson Kuo), guest speaker 
at the West Quincy 
Congregational Church, 
Buckley St., at the 10 a.m. 
worship on Sunday. 



Born in Canton, China. 
Brother Kuo belonged to the 
final group of students sent by 
Chiang Kai Chek to study in 
American universities. Due to 
the Communist takeover in 
1946, he remained in this 
country. 

A resident of Scituate, Bro. 



Kuo is a managing consultant 
with degrees from Columbia 
University and the Evangelical 
School of Theology. 

He will be introduced b\ 
the Rev. Keijo Aho. pastor 

The public is invited to 
attend. A coffee hour will 
follow worship. 



Umon Congregotionol 
Church of Wollaston 

B«ach Street at Rawson fi. d 

Church School 9 cm. 
Sun. Worship 10 a.ni. 

47».666l (Child Care Provided) 
Rev Zaven Dohanian. Paslo.' 

Join Uf In Faith 
ond Fellowship | 



Fort Devens Chaplain Guest Minister 
At Squantum First Church 



Major John Sumner will be 
the guest minister at the First 
Church of Squantum. 
Sunday, Jan. 14 at 10:30 a.m. 

Major Sumner is a chaplain 



f ' ^'■■■- . V .\\er at present 
but has been stationed all over 
Europe. 

There will be a social hour 
following the service with 



Young Aduh Depres 
Houghs Neck Council 



Sally Wainwright and 
Barbara Walter as Hostesses 

Guests are always welcome 
at any service. 



"Young Aduhs' Depression 
and How it Affects Them" 
will be the subject of a talk of 



sion 
Topic 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . 
Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informal look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For harther information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

* * > » 

: I.' Church of St. John the Baptist. 44 School St., Quincy 773 1021 




Tuesday, Jan. 16, at 8 p.m. at 
an open meeting of the 
Houghs Neck Community 




Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School SI. Quincy. Mass 

PASTOh 
Rtw. William R. McCarthy 



ASSOCIATES 

Rtv. Jama* C. Tuxbury 

Rev. Gary S. Sullivan 

Rtv. Richard McEntae 

Rtv. Thaodora L. Fortlar 

(Oumcy CHy Ho^Mal ClMpl«in) 

Rtv. Mr. Chariaa SullWan, 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 
week Days: 8 am and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel 
' Sat 3-3 45 PM 
Rectory-21 Gay St "^ 



Council at the Houghs Neck 
Community Center, 1 193 Sea 
St., Quincy. 

The talk will be by a 
member of the Samaritans 
(Samariteens) of Boston. 

The program is sponsored 
by the Houghs Neck 
Community Council and 
Deware Funeral Home. 



f 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 

Wollaston Churcli 
of the ^Nazarene 



^3> 





37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 
— Services — 

Sunday 1100am teOOpm 

Wvdncfday ' 00 p m 

~Vour Communily Church' 






Thursday, January II, 1 990 Quincy Sun Page II 




Real Estate News 




Building Permits For 
Over $4M In Construction 



Tareer Night' At Century 
21 Tulish & Clancy Jan. 17 



The Quincy Building 
Department issued 287 
permits totaling more than $4 
million during November and 
December, according to 
recent reports. 

In November, there were 
180 permits issued totaling 
$2,004,772. Last month, there 
were 107 permits issued 
equaling $2,003,517. 

November's report lists the 
following: 

• Three one-family 
dwellings at an estimated cost 
of $240,800. 

• One garage for $10,000. 

• One hundred and 



seventeen residential 
alterations totaling $796,117. 

• Twenty-six other 
alterations equaling $863,650. 

• Seven removals, $7,200. 

• Fourteen signs, $18,380. 

• Twelve miscellaneous 
permits totaling $68,625. 

In November, 1988, there 
were 199 permits issued 
totaling $8,764,775. 

Receipts for November, 
1989, amounted to $38,479. 
There were also $2,544 worth 
of public safety inspection 
fees. 

December's report lists the 
followinji: 



dwell- 



• One two-family 
ing, $90,000. 

• Seventy-four residential 
alterations, $677,662. 

• Fourteen other altera- 
tions, $492,100. 

• Three removals, $505,200. 

• Seven signs, $10,080. 

• Eight miscellaneous 
permits, $228,475. 

In December, 1988, 102 
permits totaling $6,632,350 
were issued. 

Last month's receipts 
totaled $29,940 while there 
was $2,276 in public safety 
inspection fees. 



Century 21 Tullish & 
Clancy will host a "Career 
Night" Wednesday, Jan. 17 at 
7 p.m. at its 1440 Hancock St. 
location. 

The event is part of open 
house activities and 
individual conferences set up 
by local Century 21 offices 
throughout the week of Jan. 
15-21 in behalf of the 
international organization's 
annual "Career Opportunity 



Week." 

Individuals considering a 
career change in the 
upcoming year or those just 
entering the work force are 
encouraged to contact any 
local Century 21 office to 
learn more about real estate as 
a career. There is no 
consultation fee and no 
obligation. 

"There is a need for 
qualified real estate 



professionals," said Richard 
Loughlin, president and CEO 
of Century 21 Real Estate 
Corporation. 

"Career Opportunity Week 
offers people a chance to find 
out how they can realize their 
professional, financial and 
personal goals in a flexible 
work environment." 



Call 773-7300 
information. 



for more 



Manpower, Inc. Occupying 
Space At 1200 Crown Colony Dr. 



Mary Smith Associates 
Receives Landscaping Award 



Mary Smith Associates 
Landscape Architects of 
Quincy was recently honored 
with a Gold First Place 
Commercial Development 
Award for its work with 
Vazza Associates and Edward 
A. Fish Associates. 

The company provided 
landscape design services for 
several buildings, the main 
entry, ponds and roadways 
for Crown Colony Office 
Park in Quincy. The PRISM 
award was presented at a 
black tie gala at the Museum 
of Fine Arts, Boston. 

The awards were given to a 
select group of building 
industry professionals whose 
projects met the stringent 
criteria for design excellence 
set by the Sales and 
Marketing Council (SMC) of 
the Builders Association of 
Greater Boston (BAGB), 
sponsors of the award 
competition. 

Massachusetts develop- 
ments, including new 
construction and remodeling, 
residential and commercial 




MARY SMITH 

projects, were eligible to 
enter. Judging was conducted 
by a panel of recognized 
development, design and 
marketing experts. 

The Crown Colony Office 
Park is built within a 175- 
acre site. When completed, 
this development will 
accommodate two million 
square feet of office space in 
more than 22 buildings. A 
park-like atmosphere for the 
complex has been established 
using tree-lined boulevards, 
ponds, fountains and 



walkways. 

Mary Smith Associates has 
designed a distinctive main 
entry to Crown Colony 
incorporating tall evergreen 
hedging, flowering shrubs and 
shade trees. The roadway 
within the site has been 
planted with Kwanzan 
cherries in the central islands 
and sycamores bordering the 
sides of the streets. 

Park areas adjacent to 
several ponds on the property 
incorporate decorative 
pavements, furniture, lighting 
and boardwalks. In addition, 
the company has coordinated 
with project architects and 
designed landscapes for three 
of the new office buildings. 

Designs are currently in 
progress for the Day Care 
Center. 

The second annual PRISM 
awards, a celebration of the 
industry's best, recognized the 
exceptional results achieved 
by builder members of BAGB 
and their associates. 



Manpower, Inc., a national 
temporary services firm based 
in Milwaukee, Wise, has 
occupied 2,000 square feet at 
1200 Crown Colony Dr. 
within the Crown Colony 
Office Park, Quincy. 

Crown Colony, a 175-acre 
master planned office park, is 
a joint venture development 
of Vazza Associates and 
Edward A. Fish Associates, 
Inc. Meredith & Grew, Inc., 
negotiated the transaction 
and serves as exclusive leasing 
agent for the park. 

"We were drawn to the park 
by its accessibility to the 
MBTA, and the complete 
amenities package including 
day care," said Seana Looney, 
Manpower's branch super- 
visor. "The sizeable in-place 
corporate population was 
also a plus." 

The company will use the 
first fioor space at its South 
Shore office. 

Manpower supplies 
temporary help services while 
operating 1,450 offices in 34 
countries, employs approxi- 
mately one million people 
each year on a temporary 
basis, providing support to 
approximately 3,000 busi- 
nesses throughout the world. 
Twelve hundred Crown 



Steven Mansfield Relocates 
To McGrath Highway 



Steven R. Mansfield & Co., 
certified public accountant, 
has relocated his office from 
26 Chestnut St. Quincy, to 21 
McGrath Highway, Suite 201, 
in Quincy. 

"The move to larger office 
space will enable us to more 
efficiently provide increased 
services with an enlarged staff 
to a growing client base," 







OnluiKL, 








>./,\ 




TULLISH & CLANCY R E INC 

1440 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

(617)773-7300 

(617)331-3232 

Come in 

and speak to us 

about housing 

or a career 
in Real Estate 


• 



Mansfield said. 

The Mansfield firm 
provides business, tax and 
financial services including 
auditing, investment, 
personal and corporate tax 
planning and preparation, 
financial and estate planning, 
accounting, accouting system 
design, data processing and 
record keeping. 

In its six years of 
community service, the firm 
has grown to 300 clients. 



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Colony Dr., a recently 
completed seven-story 
235,000 square foot office 
building, is now 64 percent 
leased. Aetna Life Insurance 
and Clean Harbors Inc., 
occupy 95,000 square feet and 
55,000 square feet re- 
spectively. Eleven hundred 
crown Colony Dr., a 132,000 
square foot building situated 
next to 1200 Crown Colony, 
was delivered in August. 

The Crown Colony master 
plan provides for a 300-room 
hotel, retail shops, restaurants 



and cafes, a fitness center, 
jogging trails and a medical 
center. A child care facility, 
now under construction at 
2100 Crown Colony Dr., is 
scheduled to open next 
month. 



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YES YOU CAN 

Wollaston - two family - 
exceptional offering - 
spacious 6 rm. apartments. 
Both with fireplaced living 
rooms. A walk up attic can 
expand your living space. 
Take a look. $259,900 

Many other listings avaible. 
Check Cable TV Channel 
20 Metro Marketplace. See 
several more in living color. 

Looking for a career 
change? We are having a 
Career Night at 49 Beale 
St., Tuesday night, January 
16. All invited whether 
licensed or not. Any 
questions call Mary or 
Phyllis. 

Century 21 
Annex Realty 

49 Beale St. 
Wollaston 

472-4330 




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Wollaston. 9 room Victorian 
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Wollaston. Dream kitchen 
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Colonial. $179,900 

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Merrymount. Mint condi- 
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Eugene D. Knox, Jr., 67 

Retired Engineer 



A funeral Mass for Eugene 
D. Knox, Jr., 67, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 3 in St. 
John's Church, 44 School St. 
Burial was private. 

Mr. Knox, a retired 
engineer for the federal 
government at the Chariest own 
Navy Yard and the Custom 
House, Boston, died at home 
Dec. 31. 

He was bom and raised in 
Boston and moved to Quincy 
29 years ago. 

Mr. Knox was an Army 
veteran of World War II. 

Husband of the late Dois 
(Butler) Knox, he is survived 
by three sons, Eugene D. 
Knox III of Hyde Park, 
Michael Edward Knox of 



South Boston and Edgar J. 
Knox of Watertown; three 
daughters, Marion F. Small 
of Bridgewater, Ellen M. 
Lucas of Quincy, and 
Dorothy E. Francis of 
Somerville; his mother. 
Bertha M. (Markham) Knox 
of Quincy; two sisters. 
Marion Bianchi of California 
and Audrey Coady of 
Braintree; and five grand- 
children. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 
Independence Ave. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society. 
294 Pleasant St., Stoughton 
02072. 



Robert D. D'Angelo 

Owned Auto Service 



A funeral Mass for Robert 
D. D'Angelo, 59, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Monday at St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. D'Angelo died Jan. 5 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. Burial was at Pine Hill 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

A former owner of Bob's 
Auto Services on Quincy 
Ave., he was a lifelong Quincy 
resident. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Barbara M. (Sprague) 
D'Angelo; his mother, 
Constance D'Angelo; three 
sons, Robert D. D'Angelo Jr. 
of Quincy, Mark S. D'Angelo 
of Weymouth and David R. 



D'Angelo of Quincy; a 
daughter. Melissa A. 
D'Angelo of Quincy; three 
brothers, C. Paul D'Angelo, 
Raymond D'Angelo and 
Russell D'Angelo, all of 
Quincy; and a sister, Eleanor 
Pestelli of Quincy. He was the 
son of the late Rocco 
D'Angelo and brother of the 
late Dora Cosenza. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 
Independence Ave. 

Donations may be made to 
the Norfolk County-Newton 
Lung Association, 25 Spring 
St., Walpole 02081. 



Elizabeth M. Roach, 85 



A funeral service for 
Elizabeth M. (Johnston) 
Roach, 85, of Quincy, was 
held Jan. 6 at the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 Hancock 
St. Burial was in Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Mrs. Roach, a retired office 
manager at the Arkwright 
Insurance Co. Waltham, died 
Jan. 3 at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Brighton, after a 
brief illness. 

Mrs. Roach was born in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, and 
lived in Squantum before 
moving to Quincy in the early 



J920S. In 1975, she moved to 
1000 Southern Artery. 

She was a teacher in Nova 
Scotia before moving to the 
United States. 

Mrs. Roach was a member 
of Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church, a volunteer at 
the library at 1000 Southern 
Artery, and a contributor to 
many animal charities. 

Wife of the late Thomas 
Roach, she is survived by a 
niece, Shirley Hendry of 
Ontario, Canada; and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Donations may be made to 
charity. 



weeney JSroihers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 




■Jti— ->c = 



Obituarfes 

Robert W. Krovitz 

Co-Founder Quincy Junior College 



Robert W. Krovitz, C.L.U.. 
80. formerly of Quincy, died 
Dec. 21 in Palms West 
Hospital. Loxahatchee. Fla. 

Before moving to Royal 
Palm Beach, Fla. in I986."hc 
lived in Wollaston for 31 
years, where he was manager 
of the Boston Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. Quincy office. 

After retiring. Mr. Krovitz 
worked on special projects in 
behalf of college youth in the 
United States and Canada for 
the Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Foundation. 

Then, as first business 
manager of the South Shore 
Mental Health Center, he 
consolidated its four Quincy 
offices under one roof at 77 
Parking Way. 

One of the founders of 
Quincy Junior College, 
serving first on the Citizens 
Advisory Committee he was a 
member of the Board until 
moving to Florida, serving as 
president in 1966-67. In 1981. 
Quincy Junior College 
awarded Mr. Krovitz an 
Honorary Degree "in 
recognition of the service he 
provided the College and its 
Community". He was made 
an honorary board member 



when he left Massachusetts. 

A 1932 graduate of the 
University of Rhode Island, 
he was a member of Alpha 
Epsilon Pi Fraternity and 
continued his interest in 
college youth after his 
graduation, serving as the 
National President of the 
fraternity in 1946-47. He was 
honored -with the "Order of 
the Lion" in 1956. and served 
also as President of the 
National Interfraternity 
Conference, which in 1972 
awarded him a Gold Medal 
for "Distinguished Service." 
He was president also of the 
College Fraternity Scholar- 
ships Officers Association. 

Mr. Krovitz did graduate 
work at Brown University and 
Rhode Island College of 
Education. 

He wrote many articles on 
"How to Study" and spoke on 
this subject to students at 
many colleges. 

He is survived by his wife. 
Bella Krovitz. of Royal Palm 
Beach, and a son. Edward 
Krovitz of Sherman Oakes. 
Calif. 

Memorial gifts may be 
made to a charity of choice or 
to Quincy Junior College. 



Elizabeth L. Leahy 



A funeral mass for 
Elizabeth "Betty" Louise 
(Marchionne) Leahy, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 3 
at St. Joseph Church. Burial 
was in Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Mrs. Leahy, an avid 
gardener who enjoyed 
decorating, died Dec. 31 at 
home from asbestosis lung 
cancer. 

Mrs. Leahy was particular 
about having her yard look 
perfect, said her daughter, 
Deborah Louise Ford of 
Quincy. 

In the past 10 years, Mrs. 
Leahy earned extra money by 
babysitting. 

She had many hobbies. 




which included crocheting, 
ceramics and all types of 
dancing, including round, 
ballroom and line dancing. 
She and her husband, James 
E. Leahy, took lessons in 
Quincy and Canton for 
several years. 

The couple also enjoyed 
traveling. Their favorite spot 
was Bermuda, where they 
visited five times. 

Mrs. Leahy was born in 
Quincy and was a lifelong 
resident. 

She is also survived by two 
sons, Robert Leahy of Quincy 
and James E. Leahy Jr. of 
California; a brother, Fred 
Comi of Braintree; a sister. 
Rose Mac Allister of 
Holbrook; and nine grand- 
children. She was the sister of 
the late George Comi. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home. 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made to 
the Hospice of the South 
Shore, 400 Franklin St. 
Braintree, 02184. 



Charlotte S. Brusin 

Quincy School Secretary 



A funeral service for 
Charlotte S. (Pottle) Brusin of 
Quincy was held Jan. 5 in 
Hamel, Wickens, and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams St., 
by the Rev. Kenneth Rayner, 
pastor of First Baptist 
Church, Braintree. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Mrs. Brusin, a secretary for 
the Quincy Public Schools for 
20 years, died Jan. 1 in Quincy 
Hospital after a long illness. 

After she retired from 
Sterling Junior High in 1946, 
she worked for Quincy Oil. 

She was born in Bath, 
Maine and lived there until 
moving to Quincy in 1928. 



Mrs. Brusin was a graduate of 
Quincy High School. 

She is survived by her 
husband, William E. Brusin; a 
brother, Leonard S. Pottle of 
Weymouth, three nieces and 
several grandnieces and 
grandnephews. She was the 
sister of the late Herbert R. 
Pottle and Gladys Pratt. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel. Wickens, and 
Troupe Funeral Home. 

Donations may be made to 
the memorial fund of First 
Baptist Church. 594 
Washington St., Braintree. or 
the Missing in Action fund at 
a local veteran's organization 



Felix D. McCarthy, 86 

Former Railroad Machinist 



A funeral Mass for Felix D. 
McCarthy, 86, of North 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 5 
at Sacred Heart Church. 
Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Mr. McCarthy, a former 
machinist for the Boston and 
Maine Railroad and a former 
fisherman died Jan. 2 at 
Carney Hospital, Dorchester. 

Mr. McCarthy worked for 
the railroad for 1 1 years and 
retired in 1974. 

He was a fisherman for 20 
years. 

Mr. McCarthy was born in 



Newfoundland and was a past 
treasurer of the Newfound- 
land Club of Boston. 

He lived in Marblehead 
before moving to North 
Quincy 50 years ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Margaret M. (Pumphrey) 
McCarthy; a daughter, Gloria 
T. Louge of Marshfield; and 
three grandchildren. Paul F 
Louge of Scituate. and John 
A. Logue and Ellen M 
Logue. both of Marshfield 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home. 785 Hancock St. 



Marie F. Bogan, 72 



A funeral Mass for Marie 
F. (Furbish) Bogan, 72 of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 4 
at Blessed Sacrament Church. 
Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. Mrs. 
Bogan. died Jan. I. 

Wife of the late John P. 
Bogan. she is survived by 
three sons. John P. Bogan Jr. 
and Dennis C. Bogan, both of 



Quincy, and Paul N. Bogan of 
New Hampshire; a sister. Lois 
Tobin of Quincy; and eight 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home. 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society. 
294 Pleasant St. Stoughton 
02072. 



Catherine R. Burke, 69 



A funeral Mass for 
Catherine R. (Casano) Burke. 
69. of Quincy, a former 
saleswoman at the Bargain 
Center in Quincy Sq. was 
celebrated Jan. 4 at St. Ann's 
Church. Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial Park, 
Canton. 

Mrs. Burke died Dec. 31 at 
the Carney Hospital in 
Dorchester after a long 
illness. 

Mrs. Burke was a member 
of the Welcome Wagon Club. 



RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

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A thought' FOR THE WEEK 

We ail know that an alphabet it a 
•ystem of using certain marks 
which we call "letters" to stand for 
certain sounds. The origin of the 
alphabet is lost in the receding 
centuries of the past. But the fact 
that a sound made by the iHjman 
voice could t>e represented by a 
symbol is unquestionably man's greatest Invention. 
Without the invention of the alphabet many of the other 
inventions and discoveries of early man might have 
been lost to hjture generations. The world depends 
upon, and has long depended upon, the records of the 
past. Writing has made these records available. 

Lest we forget, however, the use of words Is no 
assurance of thought behind them. Our ideas may be 
vague or not dearly expressed. We are prone to repeal 
what we hear, or read, with but small understanding of 
what It Is all abouti Too often we confuse fluency of 
words with fluency of tf>ought ... 

Langunge provides an eHlclent kit of tools for the 
thinker In all of his (obs of thinking. But, Isn't H true, we 
must know how to use these tools if we are to get the 
most out of them? 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

Tel: 472-1137 

MQmbst of the "New England Funeral rrust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist. 

Serving All Religiout Faiths 

Sefv/ces Rendered To Any Distance 



She was born in Boston and 
lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 34 years 
ago. 

Mrs. Burke graduated from 
Girls High School in 1939. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Bernard J. Burke; a 
daughter, Bernardette 
Stentiford of Quincy; two 
brothers Andrew I. Casano of 
Randolph and William 
Casano of Pembroke; a sister, 
Maria Dutczak of Whitman; 
and three grandsons, Steven 
Stentiford Jr., Michael J. 
Stentiford and Joseph B. 
Stentiford. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 




AAAERKTXN 
^ SOQETY" 

+ 



Amorican 
RadCroM 



Charles H. O'Donnell, 75 

Community Activist 



Elizabeth A. Kelley, 88 

Sang In Church Choir 



A funeral Mass for Charles 
"Charlie" Henry O'Donnell, 
75, of Quincy Point, a former 
employee at the Bethlehem 
Shipyard and Boston Gear 
Works and community 
activist, was celebrated Jan. 4 
at St. Joseph's Church. 

Mr. O'Donnell died Dec. 30 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

Born in Marlboro, he lived 
in Brockton before moving to 
Quincy 40 years ago. 

He was formerly employed 
at the Bethlehem Steel 
Shipyard and Boston Gear 
Works in Quincy before 
working in the security 
department at Quincy 
Hospital. He was recently 
assigned to Pagnano Towers. 

A lieutenant for South 
Shore Security, he was 
involved in local politics and 
community activities. He was 
a pioneer in the labor 
movement and a loyal worker 
for the Democratic party. 

In his eulogy, Fr. Joseph 
Downey, pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, said, 
"Charlie was an optimist; 
always willing to help others. 
He was a popular member of 
the parish, who will be sorely 
missed by his family and the 
people in the Point." 

Senator Paul Harold, a 
close personal friend of the 
O'Donnell family recognized 
Mr. O'Donnell for the key 
role he played in his campaign 
for City Council and Senate. 
"Charlie O'Donnell was a 
brilliant campaign strategist, 
but also someone willing to do 
the hard work necessary at the 
precinct level," Harold said. 
"He possessed a dedication 




CHARLES O'DONNELL 



and credibility that made him 
a sought after person in state, 
local and national campaigns," 
Harold added. 

Mr. O'Donnell was an 
honorary life member of the 
Saville Council Knights of 
Columbus. His interest in 
Irish affairs was recognized at 
a State House reception with 
Irish Ambassador Padraic 
MacKernan. 

He recently celebrated his 
75th birthday with friends at 
the social hall at Pagnano 
Towers. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mary M. (Haddad) O'Donnell; 
and two daughters, Kathleen 
O'Donnell and Patricia A. 
O'Donnell, both of Quincy. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made to 
the building fund of St. 
Joseph's Church, 556 
Washington St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



A funeral Mass for 
Elizabeth A. "Bess" (Dowd) 
Kellcy, 88, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 6 at Star of the 
Sea Church. Burial was in St. 
James Cemetery, Whitman. 

Mrs. Kelley, a Quincy 
resident for 44 years, and a 
former choir member at Star 
of the Sea Church, Squan- 
tum, died Jan. 3 at Milton 
Hospital after a long illness. 

Mr. Kellcy was born in 
Whitman and lived in 
Brookline before moving to 
Quincy. She was a graduate of 
Mount St. Joseph Academy 
and New England Conserva- 



tory of Music, where she 
studied piano. 

Wife of the late Theodore 
R. Kelley, she is survived by 
two daughters, Patricia F. 
Duggan of Quincy and 
Elizabeth A. LeBlanc of 
Maryland; five grandchild- 
ren, David Duggan and Ted 
Duggan both of Quincy, 
Cynthia Hoar of Plymouth, 
Denise Fisher of Texas and 
Carol LeBlanc of Maryland. 
She was the sister of the late 
Arthur F. Dowd. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Ernest R. Engholm, Jr., 76 

Former Postal Employee 



A funeral Mass for Ernest 
R. Engholm, Jr., 76, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 8 
at Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. Burial was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Engholm, a former 20- 
year member of the Navy and 
a former sorter and window 
clerk for the Boston and 
Quincy Post Offices, died 
Dec. 29 at Massachusetts 
Respiratory Hospital in 
Braintree after a long illness. 

Mr. Engholm was a Navy 
veteran of World War II and 
retired as chief petty officer. 

He worked 20 years for the 



Postal Service. 

Mr. Engholm was born in 
Pilot Grove, Mo. and lived in 
Dorchester before moving to 
Quincy 25 years ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Helen D. "Dorid" (Farley) 
Engholm; two brothers, 
Clyde Engholm of California 
and John Engholm of St. 
Louis, Mo.; a sister. Alma 
Shannon of Napa, Calif his 
stepmother, Ethel Engholm 
of St. Charles, Mo.; and 
several nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St. 



Nancy M. Carra, 80 

Former Hairdresser 



Arthur A. Riihimaki, 78 



A funeral service for Arthur 
A. Riihimaki, 78, of Quincy, 
was conducted Jan. 6 by Rev. 
Keijo Aho at the West Quincy 
Congregational Church, 47 
Buckley St. Burial was in 
Mount Wollaston Cemetery. 

Mr. Riihimaki, a retired 
groundskeeper at Quincy 
Hospital, who devoted much 
of his time and energy to his 
church, the West Quincy 
Congregational Church and 
to the elderly, died Jan. 4 at 
Quincy Hospital. 



Mr. Riihimaki worked at 
the hospital 39 years and 
retired 10 years aog. 

Rev. Aho described Mr. 
Riihimaki as a very giving 
man who went out of his way 
to help people. 

Mr. Riihimaki's church 
activities extended to singing 
in the choir and to playing the 
Hawaiian guitar at worship 
services. 

Camp Clear of Carver, the 
church's Bible camp, was also 
the site of much of his donated 
work. He assisted in the 
management of the camp and 
made sure the grounds were 
well tended. He also helped 
raise money for the camp. 



A graduate of Quincy High 
School, he earned his degree 
at the University of 
Massachusetts in Amherst 
where he completed the 
agricultural program. 

Much of his time was 
devoted to helping elderly 
residents by driving them to 
stores and medical appoint- 
ments and helping them 
obtain welfare benefits if they 
needed them. 

He was a member of the 
City Employees Union, the 
Eastern Finnish Congrega- 
tional Conference and the 
South Shore Mission 
Conference. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Rita Gustava (Rosenberg) 
Riihimaki, three sons, George 
Riihimaki of Eugene, Ore., 
Arthur Riihimaki of West 
Hartford, Conn., and Paul 
Riihimaki of Burlington, 
Conn.; three sisters, Esther 
Thompson of Weymouth, 
Lillian Rollins of Braintree 
and Helen Hyvonen of 
Moxee, Wash.; and six 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Matthew A. Hannel 
Funeral Home, 88 Copeland 
St. 

I SUBSCRIPTION FOR^i 1 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



A funeral Mass for Nancy 
M. (Zona) Carra, 80, of 
Quincy, was held Tuesday at 
Sacred Heart Church. 

She died Jan. 5 at Quincy 
Hospital after a long illness. 
Burial was at the Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 



Dorothy A. 
Siteman, 71 

A funeral Mass for 
Dorothy A. (Hartin) Siteman, 
71, of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 8 at St. John's Church. 
Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. Mrs. Siteman died 
Jan. 4 at Quincy Hospital 
after a brief illness. 

Mrs. Siteman was born in 
Boston and lived in 
Dorchester before moving to 
Quincy 15 years ago. 

She is survived by a son, 
Robert P. Siteman of San 
Francisco; two daughters. 
Donna E. Ennis of Braintree 
and Nancy E. Siteman of 
Quincy; two brothers, Robert 
Hartin of Braintree and 
Joseph Hartin of Brighton; 
two sisters, Mary Skayham of 
Palm Beach, Fla. and Barbara 
Rizzo of Braintree; and three 
grandchildren. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Heart Associa- 
tion, 1105 W. Chestnut St. 
Brockton, 02401. 



A hairdresser for 20 years at 
Nancy's Beauty Salon before 
retiring, she was born in 
Boston and lived 75 years in 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Frank B. 
Carra, she is survived by a 
brother, Joseph Zona, of 
Quincy, and a sister, 
Catherine Petrucci, also of 
Quincy; and by several nieces 
and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 




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Thursday, January M, I99« Quincy Sun Page I J 

Mildred A. Niles, 85 

Owned Riding Academy 



Mildred A. (Palmer) Niles, 
85, of Quincy, former owner 
and horse trainer of the 
golden Horseshoe Riding 
Academy, South Hingham, 
Maine, died Jan. 3 at South 
Shore Hospital, South 
Weymouth after a long 
illness. 

She retired in 1974. 

Mrs. Niles was born in 
Buckston Maine, and lived in 



Portland Maine before 
moving to 1000 Southern 
Artery in Quincy five years 
ago. 

Wife of the late Alfred J. 
Niles, she is survived by a son, 
Robert J. Niles of Weymouth. 

A memorial service will be 
held later. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 



Ethel Fleming, 85 

Moliier Of Former Solicitor 



A funeral Mass for Ethel 
(Gilmartin) Fleming, 85, of 
Quincy was celebrated Jan. 4 
at St. Ann's church. Burial 
was in New Calvary 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Mrs. Fleming, a native of 
Ireland, died Dec. 31 at the 
Friel Nursing Home. 

She was the mother of 
former Quincy city solicitor 
Robert Fleming of Milton. 

She was born in Middleton 
in County Cork, Ireland, and 
lived in South Boston before 
moving to Quincy 10 years 
ago. 



Wife of the late Edward 
Fleming, she is survived by 
her son, Robert Fleming of 
Milton; two daughters, Ethel 
April of Quincy and Marie 
Breton of Saugus; 12 
grandchildren and two great- 
grandchildren. She was the 
mother of the late Joan 
Duane. 

Funeral arrangements wre 
by Lydon-Russell Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society, 
247 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston. 



Benedetta Capodilupo, 86 



A funeral Mass for 
Benedetta "Benny" (DiBona) 
Capodilupo, 86, was 
celebrated Jan. 8 at St. John's 
Church. Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 
Mrs. Capodilupo, a 
member of the Stella Del 
Nord Lodge, died Jan. 4 at 
John Adams Nursing Home. 
Mrs. Capodilupo was born 
in San Donato, Italy and lived 
in Braintree 25 years, moving 
to Quincy 10 years ago. 

Wife of the late Domenic 
Capodilupo, she is survived 




by three brothers, Peter 
DiBona and Daniel DiBona, 
both of Quincy, and Pompeo 
"Jerry" DiBona of Somer- 
ville; and a sister, Eva Gerstel 
of Quincy. She was the sister 
of the late Elizabeth Sacchetti 
Mary Quintiliani and Joseph 
DiBona. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Bolea Buonfiglio 
Funeral Home, 116 Franklin 
St. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society, 
294 Pleasant St. Stoughton, 
MA 02072. 



THANK YOU 
FOR YOUR 
MLP!" 



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PEOPLE YOUCASmYOLmAYm TOMORROW. 




(Kiotano funeral iSirvico 







KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME. INC. 

333 * 7tS Hancock StrMi 

Quincy. Mm*. 02170 

617-773-3SS1 



O^Jil 



\.i' Srl»Mtrtt Mn't.f 



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I would like 
more Information 
on funeral 
options and 
your services. 



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City 
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Page 14 Qttmcj Sw Thuniaj, iammrj II. I99t 




Special Features 



GRUBBY 



By Warren Saltier 




Clare AnnswcU's 



Starscope 






WEEK OF: January 11 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Yours is an aclion siyn of the zodiac; you don't wait (or things 
to chanye but, rather, make your moves when you sec the need 
for them. You are business-oriented, a trait that plays a key 
role in the cominq 12 months. Added prestige, increased 
responsibilities, and a leadership role are upcoming prospects. 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - February 19 

Intuition is strong, but blend it with research before you take 
any major action. Partner is preoccupied, it is important to be 
supportive without pressing or second-guessing. 

PISCES - February 20 • March 20 

Inventive spirit soars--fhis is a grand week for creative activities 
of all sorts. Frugal friend becomes more generous, thanks in 
part to your recent example. 

ARIES - March 21 • April 20 

You have a knack for combining things and also for mixing 
people from assorted backgrounds. Coworker may be unex- 
pectedly uncooperative. Watch tendency to steal the spotlight. 

TAURUS - April 21 • May 22 

You may feel compelled to make apologies, but weigh words 
carefully before speaking out. Cooperation arrives from an 
Unexpected source. Relationship with coworker is on a steadier 
course. 

GEMINI - May 23 - June 21 

You succeed in the role of teacher, with youngsters especially 
learning lessons in life from the examples you set. Partner tends 
to get carried away through this period. 

CANCER - June 22 - July 22 

You may find yourself indulging those you care about: thank- 
fully, it's a temporary situation. Influential acquaintance is will- 
ing to act on your behalf; you should make the next move. 

LEO - July 23 • August 22 

Thursday-Saturday accent new interests, while Sunday- 
Wednesday focus on traditional themes. Matters involving 
shared finances are beneficial, provided all details are 
attended to. 

VIRGO - August 23 • September 22 

Week includes seemingly routine activities but proves a period 
of significant accomplishment. You may be spending nx>rc time 
than you'd rather in the company of pretentious types. 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

Pay attention to events taking place in the background-they 
can play a key role in your upcoming activities. You may find 
it's time to try a skill or a sport that you've been resisting. 

SCORPIO - October 23 - November 21 

Don't be tempted into taking short-cuts, especially where 
finances are involved. The friendship picture is brightening 
thanks to the clearing up of a longstanding misunderstanding. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 - December 22 

'Be wary of colleagues or others taking too keen an interest in 
your personal activities. Information arriving now may be more 
significant than initially thought; study it carefully. 

ANOTHER Y£AR ^ Capricorn - December 23 ■ January 20 

^-^^ '^ Week finds you taking a supporting role-helping those closest 

to ypu accomplish key goals. Behind-the-scenes, meanwhile, 
activities are happening that can lead to your own advancement. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

January lllh, actor Rod Taylor; 12lh, actress Patsy Kelly; 13th, 
actress Owen Verdon; 14th, singer Lorcfta Lynn; 15th. actor 
Lloyd Bridges; 16th, singer Marilyn Home. 17th, actress 
Betty White. 



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Thunday, January II, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 15 



• Hockey 

Quincy Holds 

Favored North 

To 4-4 Tie 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The winlcss Quincy hockey 
team turned in its best 
performance in several years 
and held heavily favored 
North Quincy to a 4-4 tie in 
the rivals' first meeting last 
Saturday night. 

North Quincy's record is 5- 
2-1 and Quincy is 0-5-2. 

North Quincy played at 
Newton North last night 
(Wednesday) and next 
Wednesday will be at 
Waltham at 8 p.m. 

Quincy played Brockton 
last night, will be at 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
Friday at 5:30 and will host 
Brookline next Wednesday at 
5:30. 

"This was just a great 
showing by our kids and I 
couldn't be more delighted," 
said Quincy coach Bob 
Sylvia, "they were really 
psyched up for this one and 
the game should be a real 
morale booster. We are very 
young and most people 
expected North to be much 
too strong for us. We had 
been beaten badly in our 
previous game and another 
bad beating by North would 
have really hurt us." 

"Quincy played an 
excellent game and was ready 
to face us," said North coach 
Dave Peters. "But I am 
satisfied with our perform- 
ances so far and was pleased 
with our 5-2 record against 
Greater Boston League 
teams." 

North took the lead in the 
opening period as Sal 
Manganaro scored his 1 7th 
goal of the season with Duane 
Keegan assisting. 

Each team scored twice in 
the second period as Joe 
Fasano scored two unassisted 
goals for North and Jim 



Marini and Scott Curtin 
scored for Quincy with assists 
for Dave Mellyn, Steve 
Mclnnis and Fred Regan. 

In the third session 
Manganaro scored his 1 8th 
goal unassisted and Scott 
MacPherson scored for North 
with Mellyn assisting and 
Regan scored the tying goal 
with MacPherson and Sean 
McArdle assisting. 

The rival goalies, Craig 
Galligan of Quincy and Pat 
O'Donoghue of North, played 
strong games and each made 
several spectacular saves. 

Earlier in the week Peters' 
fears were realized as 
Arlington, always one of the 
top teams in the state, rolled 
over the Raiders, 9-1. 

"They were just as strong as 
I figured and were far the 
better team," Peters said. 
"They are the best team we 
will face all year and I am 
proud of the way we staged in 
the game and played hard 
until the end. 

Manganaro scored on 
North's first shot of the game 
to put the Raiders ahead for 
the time being. Mike 
DesRoche and Brian 
Zimmerman assisted. 

Arlington, coached by 42- 
year veteran Ed Burns, 
exploded for seven goals in 
the second quarter. 

"North Quincy was a good 
skating, hard playing team 
and we scored a lot of lucky 
goals in the second period," 
said Burns. "They played a 
good, clean game." 

Quincy was walloped by 
Everett, 10-3, with McArdle 
scoring two goals and Paul 
Shine one. 

George Peachey's Quincy 
freshman team defeated 
North Quincy, 2-0, another 
good sign for the presidents' 
future. 



Roman, Flibbotte Tie 



Roman Gardens and 

■ Flibbotte's Auto battled to a 

4-4 tie in Executive Hockey 

League action Monday night 

at the Youth Arena. 

Ed Mullen had a hat trick 
and two assists for Roman 
Gardens. Stan Lisowski had 
the other goal and John 
Farren had two assists and 
Mike Owings one. Kevin 
Lewis, Mark Paolucci, Mike 
Manganaro and Jim Cooney 
had Flibbotte's goals and 
Paolucci, Jack Erickson, 
Kevin Lewis and Steve Lewis 
had assists. 

Grumpy's Pub topped 
South Shore Bearing, 4-2, on 
goals by Paul Veneziano, 
Rick Joyce, Marty Tolson 
and Mark Boulter. Ed Dwyer, 



Dave Perdios, Bouiter, Dick 
McCabe, Veneziano, Joyce 
and Tolson had assists. South 
Shore goals wfre scored by 
Jay Powers and Chip Linscott 
with assists for John Mitchell, 
Frankie Guest and Powers. 

Adams Sports edged 
Beacon Sports, 4-3, as Billy 
Hanson scored twice and Paul 
O'Brien and Mike Flaherty 
once each. Dennis O'Connell 
had three assists, Dave Lewis 
two and Scip Manganaro and 
Fred Cobban one each. 
Dennis Bertoni had two goals 
and Bob Boyle one for 
Beacon. Jim DePietro had 
two assists and Boyle, Fred 
Cashman and Peter DiBona 
one each. 



I 



W. 




TWINS Gayle, left, and Patti Morrell of Quincy are key 
members of the Plymouth State College Women's basketball 
team. The daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morrell and 



former Quincy High players are front court standouts for 
coach Suzan Rowe's Panthers. 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



Presidents Still Looking 
For First Victory 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The Quincy boys' basket- 
ball team is finding the going 
rough with an 0-8 record, but 
coach John Franceschini, 
although naturally disap- 
pointed, is not disheartened 
and is still looking forward to 
an interesting season. 

The Presidents, following a 
good showing against 
Brockton, played a lethargic 
game against Suburban 
League power Cambridge 
Rindge and Latin and were 
throttled, 78-28, last Friday. 

Quincy will play at Newton 
North Friday night at 7:30 
and will be idle next Tuesday. 



• txcept lor the Cambridge 
game, we have been in most 
games until late in the game 
and I expect we will regroup 
and start turning things 
around against North Quincy 
(last Tuesday night)," said 
Franceschini. "We have only 
one returning starter and the 
other teams, especially teams 
like Cambridge and Brockton, 
are bigger, deeper and more 
experienced. 

"We played well against 
Brockton and I thought that 
our strong showing would 
carry over into the Cambridge 
game. But we didn't play well 
at all in that game. I don't 
really think any team is 50 



points better than we are. But 
we had a fine practice the next 
day, the boys were upbeat and 
I know they would be ready to 
face North Quincy." 

Franceschini is using six or 
seven players who will be back 
next year most of the playing 
time. 

"Joey Russell, .our only 
returning starter, is playing 
well and Mike Scolari has 
been outstanding on defense," 
Franceschini said. "He did a 
great job against Brockton's 
high scoring Curt Bostic. E.J. 
Nordstrom is another who 
has been playing good ball." 

Against Cambridge (7-1), 
Russell led the Presidents 



with 14 points. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
held Brockton to its lowest 
score of the year in losing, 55- 
39. 

"We held Brockton to its 
lowest total and also held 
Bostic to his lowest total," 
Franceschini said. "Brockton 
had only 22 points, a new low 
for them, in the first half. 
Brockton is again one of the 
top teams in the league and I 
was pleased with our effort in 
that game." 

Nordstrom led the 
Presidents in that game with 
17 points and Russell scored 
12. 



Rindge Too Much For North 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team found 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin, 
a perennial Suburban League 
power, too much last week as 
the Raiders lost, 74-55, 
dropping their record to 2-5. 

Ted Stevenson's North 



team will host Waltham 
Friday night at 7:30 and will 
be at Brookline next Tuesday 
night. 

North shut down Cam- 
bridge's vaunted back court 
duo of Omo Moses and Colin 
Lawson for three quarters but 



in the fourth quarter Moses 
scored eight of his 12 points to 
spark the winners. Bob 
Mickie led Cambridge with 18 
points and Lawson scored 
seven. 

Erik DeBoer and sopho- 
more Desmond Bellot placed 



the Raiders with 13 points 
each. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by iHilldIng a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Quincy 



FOOTBALL 

BASEBALL 

HOCKEY 

SOCCER 

CAMPING 
Canton Hanover 



Piflt H QdMcy Sm Thursday, January II, 1991 



Keohane's, Bersani In 
Pee Wee Jamboree Showdown 



Keohane's and Bersani 
Brothers were scheduled to 
meet Tuesday night in the 
finals of the Pee Wee House 
League jamboree. 

Keohane's defeated UCT, 
6-1, and Bersani edged 
Colonial Federal, 4-3, in the 
semifinals. 

David Dohertv had two 



goals and Brendan O'Brien, 
Robbie Callow, Tom 
Moriarty and Eric Oliva one 
each for Keohane's. Scott 
MacPherson and Oliva had 
two assists each and Josh 
Wingate, Moriarty, Tom 
Hawes and Dan Donahue one 
apiece. Jamie Murphy scored 
for UCT and Chris McArdle 



assisted. 

Rob Flannery had two 
goals, including the winner in 
overtime, and Pat Tevenan 
and Jason Healy one each. 
J.J. Farrell and Chris Grant 
had assists. Joe McPhee 
scored twice and Eric Griffin 
once for Colonial Federal and 
Jeff Earnest had an assist. 



North Swimmers 
Lose To Newton N. 



Burgin, Doran In 
Squirt House Finals 



Burgin Platner and Doran 
A Horrigan will meet in the 
finals of the Squirt House 
League jamboree Friday 
night at 6:40 at the Youth 
Arena. 

Burgin defeated Johnson 
Motor Parts, 3-1, and Doran 
topped the Quinry *?>»" 'i-'* 



in the semifinals. 

Tim Sheehan, Robbie 
Winter and Danny Stock 
scored for Burgin and Winter 
had two assists. Danny Stone 
scored for Johnson with Billy 
Barron assisting. 

Paul Princiotto and Dennis 
Allen had two goals each for 



Doran and Mike Ryan and 
Robbie Pirelli one apiece. 
PireUi and Mike Ryan had 
two assists apiece and Brian 

Degan, Jason Snaith and 
John Ryan one each. Brad 
Macauley and Chris DiMattia 
scored for the Sun. 



The North Quincy swim 
team, after winning its first 
four meets, suffered its first 
loss last week, losing to a 
strong Newton North team, 
101-68. 

Bill Walker's Raiders will 
be at Cambridge Rindge and 
Latin today (Thursday) at 
3:30 and next Thursday will 
be at Brookline at 4 o'clock. 

The Raiders had improved 
their record to 4-0 with a 102- 
64 victory over Blue Hills. 

Kevin Heffernan had a 



score of 148.95 in diving, 
qualifying him for the South 
Sectional championships. 

North's winners were Mike 
lacobacci in the 50 (28.7); 
Mark Nitschke, 200 (2:19.3); 
Nitschke, 500 (6:36.6); Dan 
Reilly, 200 individual medley 
(3:05); Mike Howie, 
breaststroke (1:37.5); Scott 
Harris, backstroke (1:24.3); 
Reiily, butterfly (1:10.3); 
Heffernan, diving, and the 
200 medley relay team of 
Harris, Don Howie, Reilly 



and Erik Schwendenman 
(2:13.0). 

Placing second were 
lacobacci, 100; Greg Mackay, 
backstroke; Jim Peers, 
butterfly, and Pat Noonan, 
diving. 

Taking third places were 
David Skutul, 50; Don 
Howie, 100; Erik Gustafson, 
200 and 500; Nader 
Sidahmed, 200 individual 
medley, and Bob Larkin, 
diving. 



Hennessy Defeats 
Lydon In Mite Jamboree 



Quincy Man In 

Fantasy Game With 

Former Red Sox Greats 



Rogan Hennessy defeated 
Lydon-Russell, 5-1, in the 
Mite House League jamboree. 

Chris Haidul, Bob Harvey, 
Billy Norris, Billy Connolly 
and Sean Garvey had the 
goals and Brian Quinn and 
Ryan Murray had assists. 

Balducci's defeated Purdy's 



Ice Cream, 3-1, on goals by 
Jeff Brophy, Jesse Winter and 
Kevin Cellucci. Shane 
Kabilian and Matt Kene had 
assists. Shawn Manning 
scored for Purdy's and Josh 
Smith assisted. 

N.V. Surrey edged the Paul 
Harold Club, 2-1, on Jimmy 



Sullivan's overtime goal. 
Shawn Manning had the 
other goal and Jim Parisi and 
Manning had assists. Derek 
McTomney scored for Harold 
and Spide Bertucci and Brian 
Ehrlich had assists. 

The finals were scheduled 
to be played Tuesday. 



More than 100 baseball 
fans will live out a lifetime 
fantasy late this month when 
they take the field alongside 
an all-star roster of 16 former 
Red Sox greats. 

Among them will be Dick 
Phelps, 61, a Quincy business 
man. 

Their teammates for a week 
will range from Sox legends 
Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky 
and Bobby Doerr through 




members of the 1975 Sox 
American League champion- 
ship team, Luis Tiant, Bill Lee 
and Denny Doyle. 

The seventh annual Red 
Sox fantasy operated by the 
Sox Exchange of Montpelier, 
Vt., opens Jan. 21 at the Sox 
spring training facilities in 
Winter Haven, Fla. The camp 
offers fans over 30 a chance to 
spend a week playing ball and 
socializing with their one-time 
idols. 



The campers are not 
necessarily great athletes, bu( 
all share one thing, a great 
love for the game of baseball. 

This year's participants will 
be trying to match the 
standard of success from 1988 
when a camper team won in 
the camp finale, a general 
admission game against the 
Former Sox. The would-be 
major leaguers defeated their 
heroes, 1-0. 



Squirt Bs Lose 
To South Boston 



Quincy's Squirt B hockey 
team, sponsored by Quincy 
Cablesystems, advanced to 
the semifinals of the annual 
North Quincy K. of C. 
tournament at the Quincy 
Youth Arena before losing to 
South Boston, 6-3. 

Jimmy Hasson, Matt 
Langille and Jason Snaith 
scored the Quincy goals and 
Brad Macauley, Matt 
Radzevich and Hasson had 
assists. 

Quincy edged Everett, 5-4, 
led by Robbie Winter with 
two goals and an assist. Jeff 
Coleman, Bruce Stenberg and 
Hasson had one goal each, 
while Snaith had two assists 
and Winter, Danny Stock, 
Chris DiMattia, Mike 
Gallagher, David Rowell and 
Jimmy Casinelli one each. 

The Squirt B's also 
squeezed by Weymouth, 3-2, 



in double overtime as Winter 
had two goals and Billy 
Graney one. Stenberg, 
Coleman, Hasson and 
Langille had assists. 

Winter had a hat trick as 
Quincy defeated Brockton, 4- 
2. Snaith had the other goal 
and DiMattia, Brian Degan, 
Radzevich, Rowell and 
Coleman played strong 
games. 

Goalies John Masone and 
Brian Beaton were outstanding 
throughout the tournament. 

In a Greater Boston League 
game the team edged 
Wellesley, 3-2, on goals by 
Winter, Coleman and 
Hasson. Rowell had two 
assists and Radzevich and 
Winter one each. Graney, 
Langille, Stock and DiMattia 
had fine games and Masone 
and Beaton played well in 
goal. 



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472-3090 



Holy Name Bowling League 
with a 106.70 average, 
followed by John Grande at 
103.31. 

The rest of the Top Ten: Bill 
Daley, 101.47; Jim Mastrantonio, 
100.59; Richie Warner, 95.47; 
Dan Dieso, 93.94; Joe 
Matarazzo, 93.67; Bud 
McAllister, 93.51; Dewey 
DiCesare, 92.80; Art 
DiTullio, 92.67. 

Dave Nolan rolled the 
weekly high single of 128 and 
Daley had 121. Daley had the 
high three of 319 and Nolan 
rolled 312. 

Saluti's team had the high 
team single of 486 and 
Matarazzo's team had 480. 
Saluti's team also had the high 
three of 1404 and Art 
DiTullio's team had 1359. 

The team standings: 
Mastrantonio, 69-35; Saluti, 
56-48; Grande, 54-50; 
DiTullio, 52-52; McAllister, 
42-62; Matarazzo. 39-65. 



Thunday, January 1 1, IfM Quincy Sm Pag* 17 




CITY CHAMPIONS in the Elks National Hoop Shoot are, 
front, left to right, Eric Zimmerman, Carolyn Williams, Kate 
Lavery, Todd Sullivan, Matthew McLoughlin and Julie 
Dorsey. In back are Ed Miller, hoop shot chairman left, and 
director of recreation Barry J. Welch. 



SECOND place finishers in the Elks National Hoop Shoot 
are, front left to right, Chris Meade, Chris Bregoli, Mike 
Doyle, Leah Harrington and Amanda McClory. In back are 
Ed Miller, hoopshot chairman, left and recreation director 
Barry J. Welch. 



THIRD PLACE finishers in the Elks National Hoop Shoot 
are, front, left to right, Chris McPartlin, Shawn Manninf, 
Jason Chagnon, Hillary Rogers and Nicole Chenette. In back 
are Ed Miller, hoop shot chairman, left, and recreation 
director Barry J. Welch. 



6 Advance To District Hoop Shoot Competition 



Recreation Director Barry 
Welch, and Ed Miller, Hoop 
Shoot Chairman of the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks, 
announce that six Quincy 
boys and girls age 8-13 will 
advance to the Circle District 
competition at Bentley 
College in the Elks National 
Hoop Shoot Free Throw 
Contest. 

The six were crowned city 
champions in a recent 
competition supervised by the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment and sponsored by the 
Elks. 



The city champions in the 
three age categories are: 8/9 
winners, Kate Lavery, a grade 
3 student at Parker School 
and Matthew McLoughlin, a 
grade four student at 
Merrymount School; 10/11 
winners, Carolyn Williams, a 
grade 6 student at Broad 
Meadows Middle School, and 
Todd Sullivan, a grade 6 
student at Sterling Middle 
School; 12/13 winners, Julie 
Dorsey, a grade 6 student at 
Broad Meadows, and Eric 
Zimmerman, a grade 7 
student at Atlantic Middle 



School. 

The center champions 
received a certificate of award 
indicating that they were 
center champions. 

Miller, who is the head 
basketball coach at Marshfieid 
High School presented the 
trophies at the city 
championship and com- 
mended the youngsters on 
their excellent shooting skills. 
Welch, speaking for the Park 
and Recreation Board, 
praised the sponsorship of the 
Elks for this positive 



Quincy Girls Bow 
In Heartbreaker 



The Quincy girls' basket- 
ball team, which has been 
having a rough season, 
dropped a heartbreaking 37- 
36 decision to Cambridge 
Rindge and Latin after 
leading, 24-16 last Friday, 
dropping its record to 1-7. 

Doug MacFariane's 
Quincy team will host Newton 
North Friday at 5 p.m. and 
will be idle next Tuesday. 

Quincy was led by junior 
Erin Doherty's 12 points, 
Chris Barrett had six points 
and 1 1 rebounds and Kim 



Marsden seven points in the 
loss to Cambridge. 

"They just chipped away," 
said MacFarlane. "We had a 
chance to win but just 
couldn't cash in. We have 
been in every game except one 
until the end." 

Quincy shot just 38 percent 
from the floor and 40 percent 
from the free throw line and 



missed two layups and four 
foul shots in the final two 
minutes. 

Earlier in the week the 
Quincy girls were walloped by 
Suburban League power- 
house undefeated Brockton, 
65-15. 

Quincy had a woeful night 
from the floor, hitting on only 
12 percent of their shots. 



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Sports 
Stumpers 



1. What Canadian football team holds the record for 
winning five consecutive Grey Cup championships? 

2. Name the only quarterback who guided a Canadian 
football team to five consecutive Grey Cup champion- 
ships. 

3. Who is currently the number one active college 
football coach in winning percentage? 

4. What team fell victim to Jim "Cattish" Hunter when 
he pitched a perfect game? 

5. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the M.V.P. 
in the NHL Playoffs? 

6. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the M.V.P. 
in the NHL for an entire season? 

7. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the 
outstanding goalie of the year in the NHL? 

8. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the player 
showing the best sportsmanship in the NHL? 

9. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the best 
defensive player in the NHL? 

10. What is the name of the trophy awarded to the 
leading scorer in the NHL? 



Sports Quiz Answers 



1. Edmonton Eskimos; 2. Warren Moon; 3. Joe Patemo 
of Penn State; 4. The Minnesota Twins; 5. Conn Smythe; 6. 
Hart Trophy; 7. Vezina Trophy; 8. The Lady Byng Trophy; 
9. The Norris Trophy; 10. The Ross Trophy 



COLMAN'S SPORTING GOODS 

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recreational opportunity that 
the Hoop Shoot provides to 
the Quincy youngsters. He 
also commended the 
recreation leaders who 
supervised at all levels of the 
Quincy tournament. Over 225 
youngsters competed in local 
recreation programs. 

The winners in the City 
Championship and Center 
Champions are: 

Boys 8/9: 1st, Matt 
McLoughlin; 2nd, Chris 
Bregoli; 3rd, Shawn 
Manning. Center champions, 
Steve Avallon, Mike 



Douglas, Karl Ehrens, Jameel 
Fraser, Brendon Jones, John 
Katsarikas, Mike McEvoy, 
and Shawn Walsh. 

Girls 8/9: 1 st, Kate Lavery; 
2nd, Amanda McCloy; 3rd, 
Nicole Chennettc, Center 
champion, Taureane Tillman. 

Boys 10/11: 1st, Todd 
Sullivan; 2nd, Mike Doyle; 
3rd, Jason Chagnon. Center 
champions: Pat Danick, Alex 
Furlong, Ken Hannford, 
Danny Hennessey, Ryan 
Herlihy, Brandelle Pinckney, 
Adriel Walker, and Eric 
Wirtz. 



Girls 10/11: 1st. Carolyn 
Williams; 2nd, Leah 
Harrington; 3rd, Hillary 
Rogers. Center champions: 
Jennifer Dalrymple, Katie 
Parsons, Tomauren Tillman, 
and Shannon Williamson. 

Boys 12/13: 1st, Eric 
Zimmerman; 2nd, Chris 
Meade; 3rd, Chris McPartlin. 
Center champions: John 
Chagnon, David Gunther, 
and Bob Verney. 

Girls 12/13: 1st, Julie 
Dorsey. Center champion: 
Pui Shantai. 



North Girls Edge Rindge 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team improved its 
record to 5-2 with a 46-43 
victory over Cambridge 
Rindge and Latin in its first 
Suburban League game. 

The North girls will play at 
Waltham Friday at 5 o'clock 



and will be home to Brookline 
Tuesday at 5. 

Tricia Hughes scored eight 
points and sparked a North 
rally in the third quarter 
which featured a tough 
pressing defense. 

Huehes, who had ?0 steals. 



keyed the defense as North 
took a 36-33 lead in the third 
quarter after trailing by seven 
points at the half. 

Tara Miles iced the win 
with a three-pointer with less 
than three minutes to play. 



THE NEW YEAR! 

It's 1990, and Mike Milburys Boston Bruins have made their 
New Years resolution. Win the Stanley Cup! In January the Bs 

take on Adams Division rivals Hartford and Quebec, and the 
Stanley Cup Champion Calgary Flames. NESN delivers each of 
these games and five more from Boston Garden this month. 

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January 11, 7:35 - Boston vs. Quebec 
Jan. 18 7:35 - Bs vs. Calgary 



Pitt it Quincy Sun Thundiy, January II, 1990 



Meet The Quincy Youth Soccer Champs 




NORTH QUINCY K 
championship 



of C. won the Quincy Youth Soccer Uague's boys' under 



DCWARE FUNERAL HOME won the Quincy Youth Soccer League's boys' under 12 
championship. 




BOSTON ADVISORY won the Quincy Youth Soccer League's girls under 10 championship. 




LOCAL 103 won the Quincy Youth Soccer League's girls' under 12 championship. 

Coast Guard Auxiliary 
Offers Boating Courses 



The U.S. Coast Guard 
Auxiliary Division 1 2, located 
on the South Shore, is 
sponsoring several boating 
safety education classes 
beginning this month. 

The following classes aie 
being held: 

This Sunday, Jan. 14, at 
9:30 a.m. at the Metropolitan 
Yacht Club, Braintree, 



contact Bruce Moodie at 337- 
7777 or Bill Fuller at 848- 
2906. 

Wednesday, Feb. 28, at 
Weymouth North High 
School at 7:30 p.m., contact 
Mary Saint at 335-7046. 

Wednesday, Feb. 28, at 
Town River Yacht Club, 
Quincy, at 7 p.m., contact 
Michael Luggele at 925-1044 



or Veva Johnson at 471-4130. 

Monday, Feb. 26, at 
Marshfield Yacht Club at 7:30 
p.m., contact Ed Kimpton at 
545-0511 or the Scituate 
Coast Guard at 545-3081. 

Thursday, March I, and 
Monday, March 5, at 
Braintree Yacht Club at 7:30 
p.m., contact Margaret 
Dunne at 335-0034. 



O'Brien Returns At Don Bosco 



Ken O'Brien of Quincy is 
one of 10 returnees to the Don 
Bosco High School basketball 



team and coach Tom 
Cavanaugh expects his team 
to do well this year both in the 



Catholic Conference and in 
outside competition. 

O'Brien last year averaged 
6.3 points a game. 



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Thursday. January il, 1990 Quincy Sun Pag* 19 



Mite As 
Defeat Pembroke, 8-3 



Quincy's Mite A hockey 
team defeated Pembroke, 8-3, 
at the Quincy Youth Arena. 

Michael Ryan scored four 
goals and Matt Flynn, John 
Barron, Michael Sullivan and 
Chris Carthas one each. 
Barron had three assists, 
Chris Haidul two and John 
Bertucci one. Billy Connolly 
had a strong game in goal. 

The Mite A's won four 
straight games in the annual 
Christmas tournament at 
Cranston, R.I., but lost in the 
finals to a tough Warwick, 
R.I., team, which it had 
previously beaten, 4-3. 

Quincy edged Providence, 
2-1, in its first game as 
Carthas had a fine game in 



goal. Ryan and Sullivan had 
the goals. 

Next came a 5-0 win over 
Edgewood, R.I., as Flynn and 
Ryan had two goals each and 
Sulhvan one. Ryan had three 
assists and Betsy Stone, 
Derek McTomney and 
Barron one each. 

Quincy defeated Warwick, 
4-2, with Ryan having two 
goals and Barron and 
Sullivan one apiece. Pat 
McGann, Betsy Stone and 
McTomney had assists. 

Quincy then topped 
Cranston, 6-3, as Ryan 
exploded for five goals. 
McGann had the other. 

In the finals Flynn, Ryan 
and Sullivan had the Quincy 
goals. 



Dairy Freeze License 
Transfer Approved 



The License Board Tuesday 
granted a request from S & W 
Corporation for the purchase 
of the Dairy Freeze, Inc., 635 
Adams St., and for the 
transfer of the common 
victualer license as held by 
Dairy Freeze to Andrew and 
Dennis Shannon of Quincy. 

Atty. Robert MacComber, 
representing the Shannon 
brothers, told the board that 
they want to purchase the 

business from their retiring 
uncle. 
Both have worked in the 



business for some nine years, 
Atty. MacComber noted. 

Health Commissioner Jane 
Gallahue told the Board that 
all the equipment in the store 
is "excellent." 

Although Police Chief 
Francis Finn noted a past 
problem with parking at the 
location, he said he had no 
problems with granting of the 
request. 

"Remeber," he said, 
"neighborhoods are changing 
and people will expect more 
from you." 



Squantum Community Assn. 
Membership Drive Underway 



The Squantum Community 
Association is conducting a 
membership drive this month. 

The association is 
appealing to the 1,200 
Squantum households to join 
in "protecting the quality of 
life" there. 

Annual membership fee is 
$10 per household, $7.50 for 
seniors and includes 



subscription to the Squantum 
Community Association 
Newsletter (SCAN). 

Send check payable to 
Squantum Community 
Association, c/o SCA 
Membership, 207 Parke Ave., 
Squantum, MA 02171. 

For more information, call 
328-4851. 



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Hudson, Merlino 
Pace Aggies 



The Norfolk County 
Agricultural High School 
basketball team improved its 
record to 5-1 with a 77-60 win 
over Old Colony Regional. 

Co-Capt. Paul Hudson of 
Quincy had a career-high 36 
points and Co-Capt. Hugh 
Merlino, also of Quincy, had 
25, including three three- 



pointers. 

In their previous game the 
Rams suffered their first loss, 
80-77, to Cape Cod Technical. 
Merlino scored 25 points and 
Hudson had 23. 

The Rams won the holiday 
festival tournament at Bristol 
Agricultural School in 
Dighton. 



Quinn Sees 
Michigan In Rose Bowl 



Former University of 
Michigan football player 
Gary Quinn, son of Mrs. 
Lorraine Quinn and the late 
City Councillor John Quinn, 
attended the Rose Bowl game 
between Michigan and 
Southern California on New 
Year's Day with three 
companions, Steve, Ken and 



Chris Mann of Quincy. 

Quinn played on the 
Michigan teams, including 
Rose Bowl teams, in the late 
70s. 

He and other Michigan 
fans were disappointed as 
use topped the Wolverines, 
17-10, in Bo Schembechler's 
final game as coach. 




Children's Asthma Program 
Applications Being Accepted 

lessons and oihc» ^elf- 
management skills. Swim- 
ming and gym activities are 
included. 

Classes are conducted 
Saturday from 11:15 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. starting Jan. 13. 

Program fee is $50 and 
covers all costs. Interested 
families should contact the 
Norfolk County-Newton 
Lung Association at 668- 
6729. 



The six-week children's 
asthma program being 
conducted at the South Shore 
Y.M.C.A., 79 Coddington 
St., Quincy, is still accepting 
applications. 

The annual program, co- 
sponsored by the Y.M.C.A. 
and the Norfolk County- 
Newton Lung Association, 
provides chidren ages 6-12 
with specialized breathing 



NORTH QUINCY'S Football Queen, Shcrrin Quintiliani, 
kneelinc b shown wHh her court, Dana Gulifoy, left, Kerry 
Tolson and Jennifer Johnson. 

(Photo by Pete Zoiaf 

Squirt As Tie 

Quincy's Squirt A hockey 
team, sponsored by South 
Boston Savings Bank, tied 
Canton, 4-4, and remains one 
point out of first place in the 
Greater Boston League. 

Robbie Pirelli, Tim Wood, 
John Manning and Scott 
Cooper had the Quincy goals 



Steven Tobin Completes 
Army Infantry Training 



Pvt. 1st Class Steven P. 
Tobin has completed training 
at the U.S. Army Infantry 
School, Fort Benning, Ga. 

During the course, students 
received training which 



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Instruction included 
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He is the son of Marion A. 
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Tobin is a 1989 graduate of 
North Quincy High School. 



and Cooper, Dan Hughes, 
Joe Bracken, Eric Wood, 
Tom Sullivan and John Ryan 
had assists. 

Bill Barron, Mike O'Brien 
and Dan Stone did some 
excellent penalty killing and 
Tim Sheehan had a fine game 
in goal. 



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Page M Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, 1990 



Arts/Entertainment 



Multi-Cultural 

Storytelling Series 

Begins Thursday 



The South West Commun- 
ity Relations Committee, with 
the assistance of Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing, is 
sponsoring a series of multi- 
cuhure storytelhng sessions 
beginning today (Thursday). 

The program will feature 
five storytellers from different 
cultural backgrounds sharing 
stories, music and mime with 
children from the Lincoln- 
Hancock Community School 
in afterschool sessions. 

George Capaccio will begin 
the series today at 2:30 p.m. in 
the Lincoln-Hancock School 
rjifeteria. He will share ston*'* 



from ItaHan cuhure. 

Upcoming sessions will 
include Afro-American and 
Jewish stories as well as 
stories from Appalachia, 
Asia, Eastern Europe and 
Cape Verde. 

The program is designed to 
aid children's understanding 
of various culture back- 
grounds in an entertaining 
environment. 

The program is supported, 
in part, by the Massachusetts 
Arts Lottery as administered 
by the Quincy Arts Lottery 
Council. 



Winter Classes Scheduled 
At Beechwood Center 



The Beechwood Music 
School, 225 Fenno St. 
announces the following 
winter classes: 

Private lessons in all 
instruments and voice; 
Musical Theater; Music for 
the Very Young (2-3 yr. olds); 
Exploring Music (4-5 yr. 
olds); Special Needs Music 



(for adults); music mcuij 
(free to those who take 
lessons) Dancing Around the 
World; and Piano Keyboard 
classes. 

Scholarships available. 

For more information and 
to register call Beechwood 
Community Life Center at 
471-5712. 




PROFESSIONAL ice skating instructor Beth Ottaviani 
teaches both children and adult beginner and intermediate 
skills at the Shea Rink in West Quincy. A six-week series is 
being conducted by the Bay State Ice Skating School, the cost 
of which is S45 for children and $54 for adults. Dates and 
registration information can be obtained by calling the school 
at 965-4460. (Anthony l.upo photo) 



ARBrS RESTAURANTS recently presented the Big Sister 
Association of Greater Boston with a check for $1,200 from 
proceeds raised through a coupon book promotion. From 
left, Bib Sister Charlene Sherman and her Little Sister, 
Cherle; Arby's owner Bob Murray; Little Sister Crystal with 
Big Sister Beth Allen and Little Sister Sheila. 



This Week's 
Coupon Special 

Fresh Scrod 4.99Lb 

Cooked Shrimp?. 99 



y2Lb 



Specials Good thru 1/17/90 
Valid Only with this Coupon 

BURKE'S SEAFOOD 

479-1540 



^ 



61 Billings Road 
No. Quincy, MA 

Prices Subjecl lo Change 

Sorry — No Substitutions 






Company Theatre Spring Session Jan. 22 



The Academy of the 
Company Theatre (A.C.T.) 
will begin its spring session 
Monday, Jan. 22 at the Daniel 
Webster School, Lancaster 
St. Quincy Point. 

Classes run from 3:30 to 
5:30 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. Plans are available for 
one, two or three days of 
classes. 

The Company Theatre 
directors, Zoe Bradford and 
Jordie Saucerman, along with 
musical director Michael 
Joseph founded A.C.T. in 
1987 to train young people 



Sav* Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



ages 7-18 in the performing 
arts. 

A.C.T. provides training at 
all levels in acting, 
musicianship, stagecraft, art, 
voice and dance. The 
academy's faculty is 
comprised of qualified 
directors, musicians, dancers 
and artists with experience in 
teaching young people. 

Students from A.C.T. have 
been featured in motion 
pictures, television specials 
and professional as well as 
amateur dance and theatrical 
productions. 



A multi-arts celebration 
will be held at the session's 
conclusion. There will be 
performances and demonstra- 
tions by the students and 
faculty, as well as an awards 



ceremony and a mini 
Broadway musical review. 

The festival will be free and 
open to the public. 

For more information call 
773-0473 or 331-3519. 



Women's Exercise Classes 
At Salvation Army 



Registration is now bemg 
accepted for the Salvation 
Army Women's Exercise 
Classes, to be held Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday from 



jr — * *- 



furiiga 







DINING 
GUIDE 




mam 



Cantonese and Szechuan Cuisine 
Orders To Go - Cocktails 

105 Sea Street, Quincy 
471-2255 



Mon., Tues., Wed.,: Dinners $4.99 - Every Mon. Nile: C/W Night - Every 
Wed: D.J. - Every Thurs; Java Jive - Every Fri; Oldies & Top 40's - Every 
Sat: Irish Music - Every Sun: Sunday Brunch 9-3 p.m. Kids $2.99 Adults 
►^iMTMtacuJARE jg 4g . FunctJon Room Available for up to 175 people. 

15 COTTAGE AVE. QUINCY (NEXT TO HANLONS) 




PILGRIM 
RESTAURANT 



'Quincy's Family Restaurant" 



1472 HANCOCK ST., 
QUINCY 



Call Pilgrim II Go 

For TA« Out 

773-S356 



CCNTCC 

restatrant/bar 



Quincy Fair Mall, 1585 Hancock St., Quincy. Serving all fresh 
foo(to. Lunch and dinner at very affordable prices. Open 
Monday-Sat 1 1 :30-1 1 :00 and Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. 479-8655 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

68A Billings Rd. 
N. Quincy, MA 

472-8558 



9:30 to 10:30 a.m. 

Beginning Jan. 22, there 
will also be evening classes on 
Monday and Thursday from 7 
to 8 p.m. 

Classes are held at The 
Salvation Army, 6 Baxter St., 
Quincy. Further information 
is available by calling 472- 
2345. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 

1/12-1/18 



BORN ON THE 
4th OF JULY - R 

11:25 - 2:00 - 4:35 - 7:10 - M S . 

WAR OF THE 
ROSES - R 

.11: 45 -2:05 -4:35- 7:0 - »:35 

INTERNAL 
AFFAIRS - R 

11:35 - 2:05 - 4:40 - 7:00 • »:3S 



il!ister5U( 

64 Billings Road, No. Quincy 
328-9764 - FAX 786-9792 

— PASTA — 

Linguini 3.95 

Linguini & Meatball 4.95 

Linguini & Sausage 4.95 

Linguini 

& Chicken Parmigiana . . . 5.95 

zni may b* MJb«tltut*d tor linguini 

ALL OF ABOVE SERVED WITH 

DINNER ROLL, BUTTER. ORATED CHEESF 



TEXAS CHAINSAW 
MASACRE III - R 

12:10 - 2:15 - 4:45 - 7:15 - »:30 



SKI PATROL - PG 

12:05 - 2:10 - 4:45 - 7:15 - 9:30 



TANGO & CASH -R 

12:00 - 2:15 - 4:35 - 7:15 • 9:30 



THE WIZARD - PG 

12:00 - 2:10 • 4:3S 

STEEL 
IB MAGNOLIAS - PG 

7:00 - 9:30 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.50 

773-5700 



Thursday, January II, I WO Quincy Sun Paje 21 



Quincy Cable TV 



BG 



Ch. 3 

The local prucram schedule fur 
Quincy Cablesyslems Ch. 3 from 
Wednesday, Jan. 10 to Friday, 

'''"' ' Wednoday. Jan. 10 

5:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

6 pm Dart Fever 

7 pm Sports Scene 

8 pm Senior Smarts 
8:30 pm TBA 

Thunday, Jan. II 
5:57 pm Rhymes of The Times 



6 pm TBA 

Sunday, Jan. 14 

(53) 5 pm Chinese Programming 

Monday, Jan. 15 
5:57 pm Rhymes of the limes 

6 pm Sports Rap 

7 pm Quincy Girls Basketball 
(53) 7:30 pm Quincy City Council 
Meeting 

Tuesday, Jan. 16 
5:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 
6 pm Library Book Nook 
6:30 pm TBA 



K pm Talk About the Mind 

Wednesday, Jan. 17 
5:57 pm Rhymes of The Times 

6 pm Big Wheels 

7 pm Sports Etc. 

8 pm Senior Spotlight 

Thursday, Jan. 18 
5:57 pm Rhymes of The Times 

6 pm TBA 

7 pm Medical Watch 
7:30 pm Quincy Magazine 

Friday, Jan. 19 
NO PROGRAMMING 



Lifeguard Course To Start Jan. 17 



^ C News & Gift Shop 

J 55 Franklin St., Quincy 



On Line Lottery Machine 

Instant Tickets 



This Weeks Mass. 
MiMions is 12 Miliion 



Caras, Gifts, 
Tobacco 



Film, 
Magazines 
Stationery 
Health & Beauty Aids 



328-3272 (Open 7 Days) 



Coffee Special 
16 oz Coffee 

Pastry, 
Globe-Herald 

or Quincy Sun 

990 



Director Barry Welch 
announces that the Quincy 
Recreation Department will 
conduct registration for an 
American Red Cross 
Lifeguard Training Course. 

The course is open to those 
who are at least 1 5 years of age 
and are capable of passing a 
prerequisite swirn test. 
Registration can be made in 
person at the Lincoln 



Hancock School Pool from 
5 30 to 9 p.m. week nights 
beginning immediately. 

The course will be held on 
Wednesday and Friday 
evenings. The first class will 
be Wednesday, Jan. 17, at 7 
p.m. The successful comple- 
tion of this course along with 
a completed First Aid and 
C.P.R. course will qualify 
participants for positions as 



Lifeguards on waterfronts or 

pool loCdiloiis. 

The fee for the course is 
$10. for Quincy residents and 
$20. for non-residents. 

Lifeguard Training 
replaces the former Red Cross 
Advance Lifesaving Course. 
Additional information can 
be obtained by calling the 
Recreation Department, 773- 
1380, ext. 204. 




A father and son 

struggle to change 

their lives in 

the acclaimed 

Swedish drama. 

Max von Sydow 



PELLE 

THE 



.•v-.r^-Af*^/r->iH^ 



CONQUERop^ 



Wednesday, Jan. 17 
3:30 P.M. 




MORE MOVIES, MORE CHOICE 




JANUARY 13 & 16 - 10:00 P.M. 




Sunday, Jan. 7 
Beginning 10 A.M. 




Shirley Temple Theatre: 

UTTLE MISS 
BROADWAY 

Delightful musical with Shirley bringing a 

theatrical boarding house to life, singing and 

sharing the spotlight with Jimmy Durante. 

THURSDAY JANUARY 18 8PM SATURDAY JANUARY 13 9PM 



Burt Lancaster in 

ROCKET 
GIBRALTAR 

A heartwarming film about the grand 

children of a retired writer who |Oin forces to 

fulfill their dying grandfather s final wish. 



^^M The^ts^)F^ Channel ^ ' ^ The^fsAiE^ Chan 

^-^p Americas FaiiiiK Network - ^k_^p .A inericas Family Net w 

Continental Cablevision 

We put everything on the line for you. 



annel 



ooooooo 

AMERICA'S #1 HIT IS THIS SUmER'S 
FIRST COMEDY SMASH! 

THE FUNNIEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR SO FAR! 

RICHARD PRVOR AND OENE WIIDER TNROW 
AMERIU INTO (0LIAP$IN« UUCHnR; 

-Gene Shallt, TODAY, NBC-TV 

"PRYOR AND WILDER ARE 
TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME 

SINCE 'STIR CRAZY'AND 
THEm NEVER BEEN FUNNIERr 

-Joel Slesel, ABC-TV 

'"'PRYOR AND WILDER ARE AT THEIR 
FUNNIEST, IN THEIR BEST MOVIE YET! 
IT'S 100% HYSTERICAL AND I LOVED IT 

-Pat Collins, WOR-TV, New York 

"THE FIRST POP COJUEDV OF THE YEAR 
THAT IS REALLY FUNNY. PRYOR AND WILDER 
HAVE NEVER WORKED BEHER TOGETHER." 

-Vincent Canby, NEW YORK TIMES 

A BRISK, INGENIOUS AND FUNNY COMEDY 

THAT HAPPILY REUNITES RICHARD PRYOR AND 

GENE WILDER. THEY PLAY OFF EACH OTHER 

BEHER THAN EVER? 

-Kevin Thomas, LOS ANGELES TIMES 

SEEN@EV|1, 
HGilftN@m 



H^ 




\ 



□DG 






MORE MOVIES. MORE CHOICE 



CHANNEL 29 

Staff: 471-9143 Computer Phone: 

until 9:30 p.m. 328-9090 24 Hrs. 

CONTINENTAL CABLEVISION 



Pair 22 Quincy Sun Thursday. January II, 1990 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 




City of Quincy 

The owners or occupants ot the following 
described parcels of land situated in the 
City of Ouincy. In the County of Norfolk. 
and ttie Commonwealth ot Massachusetts, 
and the public are hereby notified that the 
taxes, thereon, severally assessed for the 
years herinafter specified, according to the 
list commited to me as Treasurer and 
Collector for the City of Quincy, and the 
board of Assesors of said City, remian 
unpaid, tnd that said parcels of land will be 
taken for the City of Ouincy on 

Thursday, 
The 25th Day 

Of 
January, 1990 

at ten o'clock a m for the payment of said 
taxes and interest 'f any wlt^ all >«ga> 
costs and cha'ges thereon unless the 
same shall be previously discharged 

1988 Taxes 



PACELL* DEVELOPMENT CORP 
(M r C 0'3J>66 A certain parcel pi 
la-^a cor';ai^i'>g 389~J- s' Squar* 
Feet situaiec ufio^ T»if Moinners soe 
of P.c&^i D' Beinj aesipnaiec ■■" 
Assesiac" s ritan «$ L^T P". B ruv 36 
Pi- 4'rt :•>*- ^.-.' Wa>' Sewe- 
Ass«isrv' APKni.T "lei' '99? 
Se* X "■<•" \">' C-n'^'^ne; iiwes" 

1989 Taxes 

ABEl^ "Csa^: 3 S ..» MARiON ^ 
(WiLcAPC =£.*-"> ~.jST PAjL a 
MURPHY TREE A certain parcei of 
land contarning 126M square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
Southeasterly side of Wesson Ave and 
the Easterly side of Willard St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 3 Plot 1 Plan 4035 Parcel #011522 
Tax of 1969 $9837 12 

ACORN. DIANE L & ACORN. JOYCE 
A A certain parcel of land containing 
4440 square feet situated upon the 
Southwesterly side of Schlager Ave 
being designated on Assessor's plan 
as Lot pt 14 Plot 8 Plan 4031 Parcel 
»031241 Tax of 1989 $322 58 

ADDONIZIO, RAFFAELE & ANNETTE 
T A certain parcel of Land containing 
9720 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Pond Street tieing designated 
on Assessoar's Plan as Lot A Plot 27 
Plan 2030 Parcel IK)0667 Tax of 1989 
$28967 

ALEXANDER, ALEC P & UX ELLA E 
A certain parcel of Land containing 
521168 (1058 18 5f) square feet with 
buildings thereori situated upon the 
Northeasterly side of Cove Way 
U»504-ll. Northwesterly side of Shea 
St and the N westerly side ot Mound SI 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot 1 pt 18/ pi 19/ pt 19 3 Plot 
16/14/3/2/1/3 Plan 2016/2018/ 2017 
Parcel #031117 Tax ot 1989 $30 15 

ALLSOP MARY C A certain parcel ot 
land containing 3610 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ot Rock Ave . southerly 
side ot Spring St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 Plot 12 Plan 
1056 Parcel K001031 Tax ot 1989 
$640 78 

ANDREWS. ROBERT H A certain 
parcel of Land coniaining (268 768) 
i922 sq ft 1 square feet with buildings 
tnereon situated upon the Westerly 
Side of 542 E Squantum St U2t2W 
b».ing designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot 30 Plot 54 Plan 6076 Bounded 
On the westerly side (rear) ot East 
Squantum St Bounded by land now or 
formerly northwesterly by land now or 
formerly Victory Rd . northerly by land 
now or formerly Boston Harbor Manna 
Co northeasterl/ by land now or 
formerly by Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northerly by land now or formerly of 
Boston Harbor Manna Co 
northwesterly by aldn now or formerly 
by Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northerly by land now or tormerl/ of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northeasterly, by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Marina Co 
southeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northwesterly by land now or formerly 
Ot Boston Harbor Manna Co 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
ot Boston Harbor Marina Co 
southeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Harbourside Condominiums, 
southwesterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Marina Marina Co 
Parcel #031493 Tax of 1989 $1564 81 
T C #0193 

BENNER KAREN L A certain parcel of 
Land containing 4000 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southeasterly side ot Sachem Si 
Ijemg designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Lot 687 Plot 4 Plan 5058 Parcel 
•015051 Tax ot 1989 $221 63 

BERTUCQ LOUIS G JR (FOX MINING 
CORP) i WILLIAMS THOMAS F 
TREES GRANITE ST RLTY TRUST A 
cerUin parcel ot Land containing 
25626 square feet with buildings 
thereon situ«l«d situated upon the 
westerly side of Granite Street being 
deaignaied on Assessor's Plan as PkM 



8 Plan 1168 Parcel •005083 Tax of 
1989 $4257 97 

BOGAN, JOHN P & UX MAUREEN A 
A certain parcel of Land containing 
11342 square feet situated upon the 
northerly side of Brown St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 
60 '61 62 '63 Plot 60 6 1/62 M Plan 
1057C Parcel #001093 Tax of 19B9 
$46 17 

BOGAN, JOHN P & UX MAUREEN A 
A certain parcel ot Land containing 
5043 square feet situated upon the 
northerly side ot Brown SI being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lol 
58/59 Plot 58/59 Plan 1057C Parcel 
#001092 Tax ot 1989 $21 50 

BOGAN, JOHN P & UX MAUREEN A 
A certain parcel ot Land containing 
12815 square feet situated upon the 
southerly side of Marine St being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
6465/66/67/ 68 Plot 64/65/66/67/68 
Plan 1057C Parcel #016194 Tax of 
1989 $235 29 

BOLSTER, ROBERT W A certain 
parcel ot Land containing (31.920) 
(725 sq ft) square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Willard St U»103 being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
pt 1 Plot 13Plan4114 Parcel #013243 
Tax ot 1989 $1023 39 

BONWOOD COMPANY INC (ALAN 
BORGHI) A certain parcel ot Land 
containing (553229) square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side ot Quincy Shore Drive 
and easterly side of North St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 1 
Plot 3 29 Plan 6072A Unit #125 Parcel 
•030750 Tax of 1989 $641 35 

BOUDREAU, WILLIAM P & GILLIS 
SUSAN M A certain parcel of Land 
containing (666 sq ft I 42300 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the Easterly side ot Presidents 
Lane Li»i4-10 southerly side of Adams 
St and westerly side ot Burgm Pkwy 
bei'iQ designated on Assessors Plan 
as LC A Plot 35 76 Plan 1161 Parcel 
•0198:" "^ax c» 19S9 $24 OJ 

EsRENNANi JAMES "^ i JX DiAI^E .' 
CHlK f ANG Chan E^ UX MAY LING 

~HiK CmEun Chan E^ UX Chun 
WAi-i WENG' A certaii' parcel 0' Land 
co-itainng 5000 square tee! with 
:<^ o 15s Therec" siuateo ^pon the 
•..-•-•••easie'!. soe 0' Aes: Eim Ave 
b^.-; oesig-.atec 0^ Assessors Plan 
as -c; 566 Plot 26 Pian 5054 Parcel 
•014856 Tai 0* 1989 $1039 20 

BROOME PATRICIA J & PECKNOLD 
WAYNE M TREES WINTHROP 
TRUST A certain parcel ot Land 
containing 25155 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Winthrop PI thru the 
westerly side of Bays Water Rd being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
132/136/135/ pt 133/pt 134. Plot 14 
Plan 1024 Parcel#000417 Taxof 1989 
Si 839 09 

BROWN. DEBORAH (SUSAN L 
BURKE) A certain parcel ot Land 
containing 5085 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side ot Hancock St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 
SAC Plot 8/12/19 Plan 6170 Parcel 
#023122 Tax ot 1989 $2673 62 

BROWN. DOROTHY ANN & MORAN. 
THOMAS J SR (DOROTHY A 
BROWN) A certain parcel of Land 
containing 7034 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ot Stewart Street being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lol 
pt 111 Plot 8 Plan 2029 Parcel #006653 
Tax of 1989 $72674 

BUTTS. FREDERICK T JR PAUL M 
MCLAUGHLIN ET UX FRANCES. 
MANCUSO JOSEPH TREES 
SPAULDING ST RLTY TRUST A 
certain parcel ot Land containing 5%5 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side ot 
Spaulding St l}eing designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 24 Plot 22 Plan 
2087A Parcel 008320 Tax ot 1989 
S697 65 

CAPPOLA. RALPH (STOUGHTON 
STREET REALTY TRUST. DANIEL 
CRONIN TREE) A certain parcel of 
Land containing 5000 square feet with 
buildings 'hereon situated situated 
upon the nortnerly side of Stoughton 
Si being designated on Assessors 
Plan as Lot 512/513 Plot 10 Plan 1073 
Parcel #001642 Tax of 1989 $127 13 

CASANOVA. GINO, JOSEPH A & 
ANN (PAUL J ROONEY ET UX JEAN 
M ) A certain parcel ot Land 
containing 7274 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
east3rly side ot Dayton SI being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
13/14/15 Plot 10 Plan 4057 Parcel 
011914 Tax of 1989 S647 82 

CASE, ROBERT S W 4 UX DEBRA L 
A certain parcel of Land containing 
9000 square feel with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Traftord Street being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
14 Plot 13 Plan 3080 Prcel #010245 Tax 
ot 1989 $2031 59 and for water lien 
$311 15 

CAWLEY JANICE M A certain parcel 
of Land containing 8604 square feet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the westerly side ot Pine St being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 18 Plan 5166 Parcel #017622 Tax 
of 1989 $962 90 

CEDRONE. PETER & UX FLORENCE 
A certain parcel ot Land containing 
6000 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southeasterly 
side of Rodman Street being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol 
48 Plot 7 Plan 3078 Parcel #010224 
Tax of 1989 $15 64 

CERILLI THERESE M A certain 
parcel of Land containing 4000 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the southeasterly side of 
Campbell St being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 47/pt 46 Plot 47 
Plan 4072C Parcel #012353 Tax of 
1969 $660 20 

CHAW KVIN KOK « UX MEI LAN A 
certain parcel ot Land containirtg 



10768 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
of Faxon Lane being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lol A Plot 29 Plan 
2088A Parcel 008368 Tax ol 1989 
$776 08 

CLARKE VIOLA TRS TWENTY- 
SEVEN COPELAND ST RLTY TRUST 
A certain parcel ot Land containing 
3954 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side ol Copeland Street being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
pt 3/pt 4 Plot 32 Plan 4001 Parcel 
#010645 Tax ol 1989 $1539 89 

COLARUSSO, GEORGE P A certain 
parcel ot Land containing 6210 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Bower Road 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Plot 5 Plan 2087 Parcel #008309 Tax 
of 1989 $951 28 and for water lien 
$47 88 

COLLEARY, MICHAEL W & UX MARY 
P A certain parcel of Land containing 
13793 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the south- 
westerly side of Clay St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Plot 
1 Plan 5088 Parcel #016011 Taxof 1989 
$2168 21 and for water lien $652 87 

COLLIGAN, HENRY T & UX 
KATHLEEN E (THOMAS J 
FITZGERALD) A certain parcel ot 
Land containing 87120 square feet 
situated upon the northerly side ot 
Furnace Rook Pkwy being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Plot 1 Plan 4123 
Parcel #013389 Tax ot 1989 $152306 

CONNOLLY, JOSEPH F 4 UX FLORA 
F A certain parcel of Land containing 
7281 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side ol Billings Street being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 1 1 Plot 27 Plan 6052 Parcel #020004 
Taxof 1989 $1786 18 

COOK, ARTHUR G 4 COOK, ROBERT 
A A certain parcel of Land containing 
11069 square feel with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side ot Albion Rd being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 6/E Plot 6/5 Plan 
5016A Parcel #013883 Tax ol 1989 
$1080 30 

COYNE. JOHN & UX JOSEPHINE T 
A certain parcel of Land containing 
5040 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side ot Bromtield St being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lol 477/pt 478 
Plot 31 Plan 5031 Parcel #014420 Tax 
of 1069 $793 54 

CURRIER. LEONARA U & CURRIER. 
DOROTHY G A certain parcel of Land 
containing 3894 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
wsterly side ot Newport Avenue & 
northerly side of George Rd being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 9 
Plot 19 Plan 5194 Parcel #018221 Tax 
of 1989 $202 28 

DENELSbECK. BELFORD C & UX 
MILDRED P A certain parcel ot Land 
containing 5370 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Pine St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 14 Plot 32 Plan 5148Parcel #017128 
Tax of 1989 $782 92 

DIMANNO. PAUL 4 UX MARJORIE A 
certain parcel ot Land containing 
(268.765) (760 sq ft ) square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ot 542 E Squantum St 
U611W being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 30 Plot 54 Plan 
6076 bounded northwesterly by land now 
or formerly of Victory Road northerly 
by land now or formerly of Boston 
Harbor Marina Co . northeasterly by 
land now or formerly ol Boston Harbor 
Marina Co . northerly by land now or 
formerly ot land ol Boston Harbor 
Marina Co . northwesterly by land now 
or formerly ot Boston Hartior Marina 
Co . northerly by land now or formerly 
ot Boston Harbor Marina Co . 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Marina Co . 
southeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Manna Co . 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
ot Boston Harbor Manna Co . 
northwesterly by land now or formerly 
ot Boston Harbor Marina Co . 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Manna Co . 
southeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Harbourside Condominiums 
southwesterl/ by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Manna Co 
Tax ol 1989 $57 88 

T C «C193 

DIRKSMEIER ANDREW L JR 4 UX 
IRENE F A certain parcel ot Land 
containing 201 square feet situated 
upon the southeasterly side ot 
Whitman Rd being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 1 Plot 299 Plan 
4072N Parcel #031847 Tax ot 1989 
$3 80 

DONNELLY. BRENDAN J A certain 
parcel ol Land containing 5517 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the southwesterly side ot South 
Street being designated on Assessor s 
Plan as Lol CI Plot 26 Plan 2089 Taxof 
1989 $630 99 

DONOVAN. CHRISTOPHER P 4 UX 
LORRAINE S A certain parcel of Land 
containing 5000 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side ot Neponset Rd being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol 
182 Plot 4 Plan 1105T Parcel #003893 
Tax ot 1989 $1430 72 

DRISCOLL. EDWARD J 4 UX JOAN 
M A certain parcel of Land containing 
5875 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side ot Liberty St being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt B Plot 38 
Plan 3064 Parcel #009903 Tax of 1989 
$2059 86 

DUANE, HERBERT T DUANE 
WILLIAM J (QUARRY HILL TRUST, 
EDWARD J LACEY, TREE) A certain 
parcel of Land containing 184259 
>quare feet situated upon tf>e southerly 
side of Ricciuti Or beir^g designated 
oft Aumaor t Plan a* Plot 23 Plan 41 26 
Parcel #013560 Tax of 1969 $3049 21 



DUBE, ALBERT J 4 UX SHERRY J A 
certain parcel of Land containing 
(1,319,868) square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side ot Whaler Lane 4 East Squantum 
U#83 being designated on Assessor s 
Plan as Lot 14 Plot 36 Plan 6076 Parcel 
#030606 bounded southerly by 
Victory Road, westerly by land now or 
formerly ot Donald R Dickinson et ux 
Anita, southerly by land now or 
formerly of land of Donald R 
Dickinson et ux Amla, easterly by land 
now or formerly ot Donald R 
Dickinson et ux Anita, westerly by 
Marina Drive and Boston Harbor 
Marina, northerly by Dorchester Bay. 
easterly by City of Quincy. northerly by 
City ot Ouincy. easterly by East 
squantum St Tax ol 1989 $1299 08 

TC #C106 



DUCHAINEY FRANCIS P & UX ANNA 
M A certain parcel ot land containing 
6400 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
of Elm Avenue and the southerly side 
of Green St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol 70 Plot 11 Plan 
5044 Parcel #014635 Tax ol 1989 
$870 95 

ECHELLE MELVIN G 4 UX 
CHARLOTTE D A certain parcel of 
land containing 4500 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Hudson Street Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
247 Plot 7 Plan 1122 Parcel #004347 
Tax of 1989 $1249 82 

FALLON LAWRENCE F 4 UX MARY 
M A certain parcel of land containing 
6300 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southwesterly 
side ot Willow St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 313 Plot 7 Plan 
5036 Parcel #014517 Tax ot 1989 
$1311 55 

FEENEY RICHARD 4 JOHN TREE 
RIJAC REALTY TRUST (GEZEGORZ 
KULAK. ALINA PUSZKO) A certain 
parcel of land containing 5475 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the southerly side of Whitwell St 
Being designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Lot 29 Plot 6 Plan 1182 Parcel 
#005504 Tax ot 1989 $1041 18 
FINN JAMES A JR 4 UX KATHLEEN 
A certain parcel of land containing 
5000 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side of E Elm Ave Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lot 598 Plot 8 
Plan 5053 Parcel #014837 Tax of 1989 
$526 44 

FIRST GRANITE CORPORATION A 
certain parcel of land containing 1741 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side of Sea 
St (rear) Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot A2 Plot 29 Plan 
10571 Parcel #001154 Tax of 1989 
$364 47 

FLYNN DAVID A 4 KENNETH J A 
certain parcel ot land containing 2756 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side ot 
Apthorp St and the westerly side of 
Quincy Shore Drive Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lot A Plot 38 
Plan 6016 Parcel #018957 Tax of 1989 
$1316 87 and tor water lien $261 45 

FOLEY PATRICK A 4 UX JOSEPHINE 
V A certain parcel of land containing 
5137 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
ol Tirrell and the northerly side of 
Atlantic St Being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot pt 10 Plot pt 10 
Plan 6068A Parcel #020539 Tax of 
1989 $1673 60 

FORD JOSEPH A & UX ELLEN I 
(DORIS CAPORELA, ALICE PETRELLI) 
A certain parcel of land containing 
4413 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side of Watson Rd Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lot A Plot 109 
Plan 2061 Parcel #007752 Tax of 1989 
$641 35 

FORD TERESE 4 FORD JOAN C 
TREES CARROLL RLTY TRUST A 
certain parcel ot land containing 12404 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side of 
Norton Rd Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 4 Plot 16/40 
Plan 1097A Parol #003153 Taxof 1989 
$1705 22 and tor water hen $298 40 

FRANKLIN BARRY N 4 DILLON 
SHEILA A A certain parcel ot land 
containing 4500 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northwesterly side of Hamden Cir 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lol 494 Plot 4 Plan 5011 Parcel 
#013781 Tax ot 1989 $2247 91 
FRECCERO ROBERT R 4 UX MARY 
LOUISE A certain parcel of land 
containing 8460 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Ouincy St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 7 
Plot 8 Plan 3058 Parcel #009818 Tax of 
1989 $749 32 

FULLERTON DEBRA A A certain 
parcel of land containing 6944 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Billings 
Rd Being designated on Assessors 
Plan as Lol 310 Plot 27 Plan 6029 
Parcel #019530 Tax of 1989 $1052 11 

FURTADO HOWARD C TREE 
TUSCANY PLACE REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel ot land containing 13892 
square feet situated upon the easterly 
side of Tuscany St Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 Plot 46 Plan 
2083 Parcel #006054 Tax ol 1989 
$1009 40 

GANTERT JOSEPH F 4 UX ORA P 
(PETER KELLY) A certain parcel of 
land containing 3500 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ot Holmes St Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
pt 35 Plot 17 Plan 6001 Parcel #018637 
Tax ol 1989 $963 93 and for water lien 
$26 00 

GERMAINE JOSEPH R 4 UX 
IMOGENE E A certain parcel ot land 
containing 11250 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Highland Ave Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 5 
Plot 8 Plan 5181 Parcel #01 7893 Tax of 
l9e9$12W97 



GIBBONS KEVIN GUEST 4 UX GAIL 
S A certain parcel ot land containing 
5454 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
ot Alton Rd Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lol 1 Plot 7 Plan 
3024 Parcel #009071 Tax ol 1989 
$630 60 

GIBBONS TERRENCE J 4 GIBBONS 
KATHLEEN C A certain parcel ot land 
containing (97637) (505 sq ft ) square 
feel with buildings thereon situated 
upon the southerly side ot Comm 
Shea Blvd #108 and the southerly side 
of Right of Way Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot A 12 Plot 39/14 
Plan 6075 Parcel #030429 bounded 
easterly by land now or late ol Right ot 
Way southerly by land now or late ot 
Right ot Way and Squantum Realty 
Trust and M D C . westerly by land now 
or late ot Waterview Inc . Niles 
Development Association Inc and 
northerly by Commander Shea Blvd 
and Right ol Way Tax ol 1989 $24 55 
TC #C130 
T C on Lol 12 only 

GOLDIE JAMES A 4 UX MAUREEN A 
certain parcel ol land containing 1800 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly (rear) side ol 
Island Ave Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt D Plot 60 
Plan 1007 Parcel #000137 Tax ot 1989 
$281 46 

GREGOIRE HENRY P GREGOIRE 
MARY R TREES GREGOIRE FAMILY 
TR A certain parcel ot land containing 
7200 square feet situated upon the 
northwesterly side of Intervale St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot pi 27/pt 28/pl 29 Plot 22 Plan 
3098 Parcel #010485 Tax of 1989 
$1004 46 

GRIFFIN EUGENE P 4 UX GLORIA B 
A certain parcel of land containing 
5081 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southeasterly 
side of Edison St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 44/pt 45 Plot 
7 Plan 2023 Parcel #006528 Tax of 1989 
$1528 12 and tor water hen $247 78 

GROGAN EDMUND T 4 UX 
VIRGINIA M SEARS A certain parcel 
of land containing 7492 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the southerly side of Samoset Ave 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot 508 Plot 15 Plan 1105E Parcel 
#003671 Tax of 1989 $268 08 

HA FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (1070 s f ) square feet with 
fjildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side ot Beach St U#112. 
westerly side ol Rawson Rd . and 
southerly side ot Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030940 Taxol 
1989 $1153 55 

H A FAFFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel of land 
containing (56953) (1160sq ft ) square 
feel with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U#G03. westerly side ot Rawson Rd 
and southerly side ol Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030926 Tax ol 
1989 $1237 17 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel ol land 
containing (56953) (700 sq It ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U#102. westerly side ot Rawson Rd . 
and southerly side ot Willel St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030930 Tax of 
1989 $904 48 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (56953) (7(X) sq ft ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach St 
IJ«103. westerly side ot Rawson Rd 
and southerly side of Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030931 Tax of 
1989 $904 48 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STUCTION A certain parcel of land 
containing (56953) (710 sq It ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach St 
U»105 westerly side ot Rawson Rd 
and southerly side ot Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030933 Taxof 
1989 $912 07 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel of land 
containing (56953) (1435 sq ft ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U#1C7. the westerly side ol Rawson 
Rd . and the southerly side of Willet St 
Being designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Lot A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030935 Tax ol 1989 $1418 07 
H A FAFARD & SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel ol land 
containing (56953) (I160sq It ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach St 
U#109. westerly side ol Rawson Rd 
and southerly side ot Willet St Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030937 Tax 
ol 1989 $1237 17 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (56953) (llOOsg ft ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach St 
U»111. westerly side ol Rawson Rd 
and southerly side of Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030939 Taxof 
1989 $1197 96 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CON- 
STRUCTION A certain parcel of land 
containing (56953) (1065 sq ft ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U»110. westerly side ot Rawson Rd 
and southerly side of Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel #030938 Tax of 
1969 $1 1 78 98 

H A FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel of land 
containing (56953) (800 sq ft I square 
feet with buildings theroon situated 
upon the northerly side of Beach St 
U»108 westerly side ot Rawson Rd . 
and southerly side of Willet St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol A 
Plot t Plan 5021 Parcel #030936 Taji ot 
1960 $970 26 



HA FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel ol land 
containing (56953) (700 sq ft ) square 
feel with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U»106. westerly side ol Rawson Rd . 
and the southerly side ol Willet St 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030934 Tax of 1989 $904 48 

HA FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel ol land 
containing (56953) (820 sq ft ) square 
feel with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach St 
U«104 westerly side of Rawson Rd . 
and the southerly side ol Willet St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030932 Tax ol 1989 $982 91 

HA FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (56953) (1190sq ft ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side of Beach St 
U#101. westerly side of Rawson Rd . 
and the southerly side ol Willet St 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030929 Tax ot 1989 $1256 15 

HA FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (56953) (800 sq ft ) square 
feel with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ot Beach St 
U#100. westerly side ol Rawson Rd , 
and the southerly side ol Willet St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030928 Tax ol 1989 $970 26 

HA FAFARD 4 SONS CONSTRUC- 
TION A certain parcel ot land 
containing (56953) (1650 sq ft ) square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side ol Beach SI 
U#G05, westerly side ol Rawson Rd , 
and the southerly side ot Willel St 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lol A Plot 1 Plan 5021 Parcel 
#030927 Tax of 1989 $1553 42 

HANLON MARIE L A certain parcel ot 
land containing 1 1625 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southwesterly side ot Centre Si and 
the southeasterly side ot Station St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lol 21/25 Plot 1/12 Plan 4028 Parcel 
#01 1242 Tax ol 1989 $1600 23 and tor 
water lien $79 00 

HANNON WALTER J JR 4 
STEARNS, JAMES F IV TREES 
OCEAN VIEW REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel of land containing 825 
square leet situated upon the northerly 
side ol Turner St Being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 12 Plot 91 Plan 
1057H Parcel #001143 Tax of 1989 
$56 93 and tor water lien $26 00 
HARRINGTON DENNIS E 4 POST, 
MALCOLM B & WALSH. PATRICK F 
TREES BRACKETT STREET TRUST A 
certain parcel ol land containing 
(224,812) square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side ol So Artery, (—571) Brackett St 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot pt Opt B/ W 32 Plot 
15/14/17/10/8 Plan 1111 bounded 
easterly by land now or late ol Daniel J 
Quirk northerly by land now or late ol 
Daniel J Quirk easterly by land now or 
late ol Artery Realty Trust u/d/t 
southerly by land now or late ol City of 
Quincy westerly by land now or late ol 
Wollaston Lutheran Church 
Apartment Inc , northerly by land now 
or late ot Pecce Family Trust and John 
H Miller el ux Gladys, westerly by land 
now or late ot Pecce Family Trust and 
John H Millar el ux Gladys, northerly 
by land now or late of Bracket! St and 
Southern Artery Tax ol 1989 $9942 07 
TC #124377 
T C on Lol pt B only 
Plot 14,17 only 
HARTNETT JOHN C 4 UX ANDREA 
F (BRIAN R CUNHA) A certain parcel 
ol land containing (268.768) (1305 
sq tt ) square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side ol 542 E Squantum St U410W 
Being designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Lot 30 Plot 54 Plan 6076 bounded 
northwesterly by land now or lormerly 
of Victory Rd . northerly by land now or 
formerly ot Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
ot Boston Harbor Marina Co . 
northerly by land now or formerly of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northwesterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Manna Co 
northerly by land now or lormerly ot 
Boston Harbor Manna Co 
northeasterly by land now or lormerly 
ot Boston Harbor Manna Co . 
southeasterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Mzrina northeasterly 
by land now or lormerly ol Boston 
Harbor Marina Co . northwesterly by 
land now or lormerly ol Boston Harbor 
Marina Co . northeasterly by land no or 
lormerly ol Boston Harbor Marina Co . 
soulheaslerly by land now or formerly 
ol Harbourside Condominiums, 
southwesterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Marina Co Tax of 
1989 $2936 07 

TC »C.9J 
HENNESSY JOHN J A certain parcel 
of land containing 5000 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the westerly side ot Fayette St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
14 Plot 23 Plan 5120 Parcel #016576 
Tax ol 1989 $1677 39 and tor water lien 
$118 50 

HOLT FRANCIS S JR 4 UX LORAINE 
P A certain parcel ol land containing 
50572 square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
and southwesterly side ot Summit Ave 
Being designated on Ass->ssor s Plan 
as Lot 9/pt 10 Plot 32 Plan 5198B 
Parcel #018407 Tax of 1989 $4188 42 
HURLEY ELIZABETH T A certain 
parcel ol land containing (97637) (760 
sq ft ) square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Comm Shea Blvd #405 and the 
southerly side ol Right of Way Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
A/12 Plot 39 14 Plan 6075 bounded 
easterly by land now or late of Right ot 
Way. southerly by land now or late of 
Right ot Way and Squantum Realty 
Trust and M D C . westerly by land now 
or late ot Waterview Inc . Niles 
Development Association Inc and 

(Cont'd on Page 23) 



Thursday, January II, 1990 Quincy Sun Pa(c 23 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



(Cont'd from Page 22) 

northerly by Commander Shea Blvd 
and Right of Way Parcel D030484 Tax 
of 1989*831 11 

TC KC130 
T C. on Lot 12 only 

HURLEY VINCENT J 4 UX 
CHARLOTTE A A certain parcel of 
land containing 3114 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Sea St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
B/G Plot 39 Plan 1075 Parcel »001721 
Tax of 1989 $539 52 
JACKSON JUL E M A cerlain parcel of 
land containing 5613 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Walerston Avenue and 
northerly side of Kemper St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
195 pt 194 Plot 14 Plan 5072E Parcel 
#015299 Tax of 1989 $1677 39 and for 
water lien $54 41 

JANES ADA J TRUSTEE F/B/Q 
JANE6, ADA J , NELLIE KATIE E A 
certain parcel of land containing 15672 
square feet situated upon the westerly 
side of Granite Si rear Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Plot 
1 1 Plan 1 168 Parcel »0O5O55 bounded 
southerly by land now or late of 
Granite Place Limited Partnership, 
westerly by land now or late of Granite 
Place Limited Partnership and 
Woodridge Terrace Condominium, 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Covenant Congregational Church and 
Fox IVlining Corp Tax of 1989 $972 78 
T C » O C 62705 
JOHNSON CARL R III BUCCHERI 
RICHARD J & MASHER RALPH J 
TRE OF THE QUINCY GROUP 
REALTY TR A certain parcel of land 
containing 293189 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northeasterly side of Southern Artery 
and northwesterly side of Southern 
Artery and northeasterly side of Field 
St Being designated on Assessor's 
Plan as Lot 1/B Plot 9/10 Plan 1110 
Parcel #004062 bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Mass Electric Light 
& Power Co and Town River, 
northeasterly by Town River, easterly 
by land now or late of Oumcy Lumber 
Co . southwesterly by land now or late 
of Southern Artery, southeasterly by 
land now or late of Southern Artery, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Field St Tax of 1989 $35295 76 

TC# 125258 

KALLIO EDWARD H & UX 
ELIZABETH L A certain parcel of land 
containing 14214 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Dayton St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
23/24 Plot 8/7 Plan 4057 Parcel 
»01 1959 Tax of 1989 $568 96 
KAUFFMAN ALVINH 4 UX ALICE N 
(JOSEPH M FOTI ET UX KAREN L 
FOTI) A certain parcel of land 
containing (5250 s f | square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side of Willow St Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
180 Plot 23 Plan 5048 Parcel #014746 
Tax of 1989 $817 24 
KEENAN JAMES W & UX MARY I A 
certain parcel of land containing 81893 
(990 sq ft ) square feet with buildings 
ihereon situated upon the easterly side 
ot Adams St U609, southerly side of 
Alleyne St and westerly side of 
HancocK St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 6/1/2/pt 5'pt 4/ 
pt3/7 Plot 10/2/3/13/11/15 14/27'18' 
1 9/2/6 Plan 1 1 53' 1 1 55 Parcel #023266 
Tax of 1989 $757 06 
KELLY CHARLES S A certain parcel 
of land containing 10936 square feet 
with buildings Ihereon situated upon 
the northwesterly side of Sea St Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
25 Plot 31 Plan 1078C Parcel #002489 
Tax of 1989 $703 97 
KENNEY WILLIAM T SR TREE 
TRIGEN REALTY TRUST (C D 
REALTY TRUST-DONALD O'NEILL, 
FREDERICK M O'NEILL, JOHN J 
CARR, JR TREES) A certain parcel of 
land containing 15747 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Phipps St and 
southerly side of School St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot B 
Plot 50 Plan 3004 Parcel #008572 Tax 
ol 1989 $3208 50 

KILDAY ROBERT J &UX JOSEPHINE 
V (WEI HONG CHIN ET UX KOON 
SHEW) A certain parcel ol land 
containing 3710 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Flagg St and easterly 
side of Green St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 6/pt 188 Plot 6 
Plan 5072D Parcel #015292 Tax ol 
1989 $1571 13 

KILEY FERDINAND J III & UX 
MARGARET M A cerlain parcel ol 
land containing 150O0 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Highland Ave Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
AlO pt 16 Plot 12 Plan 5175 Parcel 
•017784 bounded southerly by land 
now or late of Maurice E McCarthy Jr 
el UX Mary B . westerly by land now or 
late of Glenn R Flierl et ux Norma 
Kroll northerly by land now or 
late ol Robert A Oilman et ux Betsy S 
and easterly by Highland Ave Tax of 
1989 $3922 77 and for water hen 
$342 22 

T C# 121065 
(T C on Lot A10 only) 
KNUDSENCARLR & UX HELEN J A 
certain parcel of land containing 6000 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the westerly side of 
Rockland St and the northerly side of 
Madeleine St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 Pljt 1 Plan 
'076W Parcel #002137 Tax ol 1989 
$1348 06 and for water lien $52 16 

LANDEY MARTIN. MIRIAM & 
CHARLES NEWCOMBE A certain 
parcel of land containing 5250 square 
feet with buildings Ihereon situated 
upon the northerly side of Phillips St 
Being designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Lol 167 Plot 9 Plan 5048 Parcel 
•014760 Tax ol 1989 $2375 67 and for 
water lien $741 09 

LARGEY THOMAS L A certain parcel 
of land containing 9620 square feet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
'he southerly side of Glover Ave Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol B 
Plot 39 Plan 6029 Parcel #019533 Tax 



LAROSA WALTER T (MAI MAI LAM) 
A certain parcel of land containing 
6802 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
ol Beacon Street Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lol 14/pt 13 Plot 32 
Plan 2059 Parcel #007710 Tax of 1989 
$8 35 

LAUKKANEN WIEKKO K & UX 
DORIS E (LAUKKANEN, DORIS E ) A 
cerlain parcel of land containing 5301 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side of 
Noanet Street Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 2%/297 Plot 
34/35 Plan 1078A Parcel #002445 Tax 
ol 1989 $505 57 

LEAHY WILLIAMF & UXADELAIDET 
A certain parcel of land containing 
3600 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the sout- 
easterly side of Cliff St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
164 Plot 164 Plan 4072K Parcel 
#012532 Tax ol 1989 $836 14 

LEBRUN ALAN TRUSTEE S A E 
REALTY TRUST A certain parcel of 
land containing 11777 square feet with 
buildings Ihereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Safford St and 
northerly side of Holbrook Rd Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
1061'1062/pt 1063 Plot 14 Plan 6108 
Parcel #021732 Tax ol 1989 $3733 52 

LINDENFELZER PAUL V JR 4 UX 
BLANCHE L A certain parcel ol land 
containing 6235 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side ol Greenview St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
20 Plot 3 Plan 5198D Parcel #018471 
Tax ol 1989 $548 23 

LOMBARD ROBERT M 4 DENICOLA 
DEBRA A A certain parcel of land 
containing (553229) square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Quincy Shore Dr and 
Easterly side ol North St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 
Plot 3/29 Unit 171 Plan 6072A Parcel 
#030797 Tax ol 1989 $736 86 

LOWRY BLANCHE M (COOK FAMILY 
TRUSTEES OF 1988 TREES 
CHARLES ELLS RUSSELL COOK, 
DONALD COOK) A certain parcel ol 
land containing 7500 square leet with 
buildings Ihereon situated upon the 
northerly side ol Holbrook Rd Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 4 
Plot 10 Plan 6128 Parcel #022332 Tax 
of 1989 $1495 23 and for water lien 
$26 00 

LUSCOMBE BRUCE D A certain 
parcel ol land containing 5980 square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the southwesterly side ol Centre 
St Being designated on Assessors 
Plan as Lol 10A Plot 41 Plan 4024 
Parcel ^011178 bounded south 
easterly by land now or late ol Eba C 
Gerstel southwesterly by land now or 
late ol Gray Rock Realty Trust 
northwesterly by land now or late ol 
Gertrude E Collins, and northeasterly 
by Centre St Tax ol 1989 $18 15 

C #113734 

MACKAY SHIRLEY A & CAROL J 
MCKAY A cerlain parcel ol land 
containing 4161 square leet with 
buildings Ihereon situated upon the 
northerly side ol Pelican Rd Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lol 
97 Plot 13 Plan 1085 Parcel #002660 
Tax ol 1989 $499 04 

MACCLENNAN WILLIAM H JR 4 UX 
LINDA S A certain parcel ol land 
containing 9900 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly and southerly side ol Spring 
SI and easterly side ol Rock Ave 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lol 4/138 Plot 7 Plan 1056 Parcel 
#001043 Tax ol 1989 $1345 96 and lor 
water lien $191 86 

MACPHERSON ROBERT M . 
HOCHBERG ALAN C . TREES OF AL- 
MAC REALTY TRUST A certain parcel 
ol land containing (97637) (375 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side ol 
Comm Shea Blvd »801 and southerly 
side ol Right of Way Being designated 
on Assessors Plan as Lot A/12 Plot 
39/14 Plan 6075 Parcel #030564 
bounded easterly by land now or late 
ol Right of Way southerly by land now 
or late ol Right of Way and Squanlum 
Realty Trust and M D C westerly by 
land now or late ol Walerview Inc 
Niles Development Association Inc 
and northerly by Commander Shea 
Blvd and Right ol Way Tax of 1989 
$326 61 

TC»C130 
TC on Lol 12 only 

MAHER WILLIAM F & UX ELIZABETHA 
(PAUL T LEARY) A certain parcel ol 
land containing 3816 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side of Post Island Rd Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot A 
Plot 1 Plan 1080 Parcel «002544 Tax of 
1989 $756 67 

MAHONY MAUREEN A certain parcel 
ol land containing 4453 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the southerly side ol Wilson Ave Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
621 Plot 7 Plan 5156 Parcel #017294 
Tax ol 1989 S540 36 
MANGANARO BUILDING LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP A certain parcel of 
land containing 8076 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ol Hancock St Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Plot 
12 Plan 1148 Parcel •004768 Tax ol 
1989 $14541 83 



MANNING DOUGLAS E 4 UX SUSAN 
HEWITT A certain parcel ol land 
containing 6264 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side ol Slandish Ave Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot C 
Plot 24 Plan 5089 Parcel »016067 Tax 
ol 1989 $953 81 

MARINELLI VINCENT D 4 UX MARY 
B A certain parcel of land containing 
6030 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
ol Highland Ave Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 5 Plot 5 Plan 
5127 Parcel #016701 Tax ol 1989 
$1731 79 and for water lien $73 36 



LEGAL NOTICE 



MARTIN ROBERT P 4 UX DENISE M 
(GLENN M LAROCHE) A certain 
parcel of land containing 5030 square 
feel with buildings Ihereon situated 
upon the easterly side ol Bnnsley St 
and northerly side ol Orleans SI Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 
F/pt E Plot 41 Plan 1060 Parcel 
#001290 Tax of 1989 $71 47 

MCAULIFFE CLARE D 4 MCPARLAND 
ANN TREES A 4 C REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel of land containing 5018 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the norlheasterly side ol 
Summer St Being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot B Plot 20 Plan 
3001 Parcel #008493 Tax ol 1989 
$1496 50 and lor water lien $268 39 

MCDONALD FRANCIS F 4 UX 
CLAIRE C A certain parcel ol land 
containing 5586 square leet with 
buildings Ihereon situated upon the 
westerly side ol Perkins St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
1 2 Plot 30 Plan 4066 Parcel #01 296 Tax 
of 1989 $1131 75 and for water lien 
$1064 17 

MCDONALD VANDALLA A cerlain 
parcel ol land containing 1 2390 square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the westerly side ol Smith St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot pt9/37 Plot 19/32 Plan 4002 
Parcel #010667 Tax of 1989 $1757 09 
and for water lien $229 14 

MCDONOUGH JOSEPH (DONALD J 
O'NEILL. FREDERICK M ONEILL. 
JOHN J CARR JR TREES. CD 
REALTY TRUST 57) A cerlain parcel of 
land containing 20659 new area for 
1990 (21504 sq ft) square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northeasterly side ol Miller St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
2/B2 Plot 3/32 Plan 4017 (new 
description lor 1990 A/B/2/B2- 
3/32/43/44-4017) Parcel #010997 
bounded northwesterly by land now 
or late ol Veronica M McArlhur. 
Genevieve A Ward and Gerald J 
Dilillo, Mark J Piu\. northeasterly by 
land now or late of Edward W Joy / 
int Gerald T Joy ''i int. northwesterly 
by land now or late of Edward W Joy ''? 
int Gerald T Joy '/i int . northeasterly 
by land now or late ol CD Really 
Trust, southeasterly by land now or 
late ol Furnace Brook Medical Building 
Trust and southwesterly by Miller 
Street Tax ol 1989 $5216 23 

TC#129152 

MCDONOUGH ROBERT JOHN 4 UX 
ALISA ANNE A certain parcel ol land 
containing 3375 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Stoughton St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 7 
Plot 2Plan 1070Parcel #001541 Taxol 
1989 $86 02 

MCDONOUGH ROBERT JOHN 4 UX 
ALISA ANNE A certain parcel ol land 
containing 3460 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side ol Stoughton St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 6 
Plot 3 Plan 1070 Parcel #014360 Taxol 
1989 $1614 14 

MCKEON WILIAM G TREE SUMNER 
STREET REALTY TRUST A certain 
parcel ol land containing 1 7096 square 
leet with buildings Ihereon situated 
upon the northerly side of Sumner 
Street Being designated on Assessor's 
Plan as Lot A Plot 52/47 Plan 2048 
Parcel #007257 Tax ol 1989 $125 33 

MCLAUGHLIN PAUL D 4 UX 
DOROTHY M MCLAUGHLIN, 
EDWARD J ET UX JULEANN A 
certain parcel of land containing 2874 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northerly side ol 
Cyril Street Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol 12 Plot 22 Plan 
2052 Parcel #007432 Tax ol 1989 
$50 06 

MONTI LOUIS J JR A certain parcel 

01 land containing 5500 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the westerly side ol Common St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Plot 

2 Plan 4013 Parcel #010932 Tax of 
1989 $644 52 

MOODY GEORGE R A cerlain parcel 
of land containing 3150 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the westerly side ol Old Colony 
Avenue Being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 2 Plot 26 Plan 
5083 Parcel #015937 bounded 
southerly by land now or late ol Old 
Colony Village Condo. westerly by 
land now or late ol MBTA. northerly by 
land now or late ol Robert J Heavey et 
ux Virginia I and easterly by Old 
Colony Ave Tax of 1989 $1440 38 

T C# 126546 

MORAN MICHAEL M TREE MORAN 
FAM RLTY TR (FREDERICK T 
BUTTS, JR ET JOSEPH MANCUSO 
TREES MANET AVE REALTY TR ) A 
certain parcel of land containing 3230 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northerly side of Sea 
St Being designated on Assessors 
Plan as Lot 3 Plot 63 Plan 1025 Parcel 
•000465 Tax ol 1989 $645 15 

MURRAY EUGENE P 4 UX ELEANOR 
A A certain parcel of land containing 
10755 square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Dixwell Ave Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lol 19 Plot 10 
Plan 1169 Parcel #005086 Tax ol 1989 
$2168 21 and for water lien S5 77 

NEWMAN WALTER L 4 UX 
GERALDINE E A certain parcel of land 
containing 5040 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ol Lansdowne St Being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
837A Plot 46 Plan 6123A Parcel 
#022226 bounded southerly by land 
now or late of Arthur L Courtney et ux 
Irene M , westerly by land now or late 
ol Richard W Donohue et ux Rila C 
northerly by land now or late ol Philip 
J Oneil and easterly by Lansdowne St 
Tax ol 1989 $1483 42 and for water lien 
$230 38 

TC #43313 

NILES JOHN, 4 THOMAS H TREES 
SUNNY LEA REALTY TRUST 
(AUBURN J PERRY) A certain parcel 
ol land containing (36.01 1 ) (379 sq ft ) 
square (act with buildings th«reon 
■ilualed upon the westerly stde ol Hon 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



Thos Burgin Pkwy and easterly side 
ol Presidents Lane Being designated 
on Assessor s Plan as Lot B/E/A/C Unit 
512 Plot 44/45/46/55 Plan 1164 Parcel 
#031329 Tax of 1989 $16 45 

NILES JOHN ETAL TREES SUNNY 
LEA REALTY TRUST (DANIEL E 
•FUENZALIDA ET UX JUDITH V) A 
certain parcel of land containing 
(36.011) square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Hon Thos Burgin Pkwy and 
easterly side of Presidents Ln Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
B/E/A/C Plot 44. 15/46/55 Plan 1164 
Unit 506 Parcel #031323 Tax ol 1989 
$236 55 

NILES JOHN 4 THOMAS H TREES 
SUNNY LEA REALTY TRUST 
(MICHAEL A OHMSTEDE) A certain 
parcel ol land containing (36.01 1) (680 
sq It ) square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Hon Thos Burgin Pkwy , and 
the easterly side ol Presidents Ln 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot B/E/A/C Plot 44/45/46/55 Plan 
1164 U#107 Parcel #031285 Tax of 
1989 $308 03 

NOBLE DAVID G A certain parcel ol 
land containing 6754 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ol Forbush Ave Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 6 
Plot 6 Plan 1094X Parcel #003039 Tax 
ol 1989 $1378 85 and for water hen 
$79 00 

NYHAN JOHN J A cerlain parcel ol 
land containing 521 168 (1055 45 sq II ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol Cove 
Way and northwesterly side ol Mound 
St U*418-ll Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 16/1/3/14/3/2 Plan 
2016/2018/10l7Parcel #031111 Taxol 
1989 $70 52 

NYHAN JOHN J A certain parcel of 
land containing 521168 (1055 59 sq It ) 
square feet with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#109-ll, and the 
northwesterly side ol Mound SI Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 18/pl 19/pl 19/3/1 Plot 16/14/3/2/1/ 
3 Plan 2016/2018/2017 Parcel #031040 
Tax ol 1989 $51 74 

NYHAN JOHN J A certain parcel ol 
land containing 521168 (1068 73 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
200 Cove Way U#217-ll. northwesterly 
side ol Shea St and northwesterly side 
ol Mound st Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol l/pl 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3 Plot 16/14/3/2/1/3 Plan 
2016/2018/2017 Parcel #031070 Tax ol 
1989 $46 64 

NYHAN JOHN J A certain parcel ol 
land containing 521 168 (1072 37 sq ft ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#503-ll. northwesterly side 
ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol pt 18/pl 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 16/14/3/2/1/3 Plan 
2016/2018/2017 Parcel #031 116 Taxol 
1989 $52 03 

OAKES JOHN D (MARGARET A 
MURPHY) A certain parcel of land 
containing (83,612) (761 sq It ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northwesterly, southwesterly 
side ol Linden St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol 1 Plot 8 Plan 
5108 Unit #208 Parcel #031698 
bounded southwesterly by land now 
or late ol Mellen Bray Corp . 
northwesterly by land now or late ol 
Incom International Inc . northeasterly 
by land now or late ol private way and 
southeasterly by Linden St Tax ol 
1989 $523 71 

TC #C194 
OCEAN COVE CORPORATION A 
certain parcel ol land containing 
(72.016) (785 sqft) square feet with 
buildings Ihereon situated upon the 
southeasterly side ol Vassall St 
northwesterly side ol Quincy Shore 
Drive U#41 1 and northwesterly side ol 
Beach St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 761/762/763/1/ 
2/B/A Plot 50/51/52 Plan 5002 Parcel 
#031027 bounded southwesterly by 
land now or late of Michael F Dunning 
et ux Martha and city of Quincy. 
southeasterly by land now or late ol 
City ol Quincy, southwesterly by land 
now or late ol City of Quincy and 
owner unknown southeasterly by 
owner unknown southwesterly by 
land now or lateol PaulKovalchiketux 
Pauline L northwesterly by land now 
or late of Vassall St northeasterly by 
land now or late of Oumcy Shore Dr , 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Beach St Tax ol 1989 $792 52 

TC #121836 

Note Lots 761762 763'3 A 

unregistered lots 

Lots 1/2 registered lots 

OCONNELL ROBERT TREE MARINA 
VIEW 2001 REALTY TRUST A certain 
parcel ol land containing (268 768) 
(1976 sq It ) square leet with buildings 
Ihereon situated upon the westerly 
side of 542 E Squanlum St U110W 
Being designated on Assessors Plan 
as Lot 30 Plot 54 Plan 6076 Parcel 
•031477 bounded northwesterly by 
land now or late ol Victory Rd 
northerly by land now or lormerly of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northeasterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Manna Co 
northerly by land now or lormerly ol 
Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northwesterly by land now or formerly 
ol Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northerly by land now or lormerly ol 
Boston Harbor Marina Co north- 
easterly by land now or lormerly ol 
Boston Harbor Marina Co 
southeasterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northeasterly by land now or formerly 
of Boston Harbor Marina Co 
northwesterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northeasterly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Manna Co , 
southeasterly by land now or lormerly 
by Harbourside Condominiums, 
southwestarly by land now or lormerly 
ol Boston Harbor Marina Co Tax ol 
1989 $3230 40 

T C •C1»3 



OOONNELL LAWRANCE F 4 
MICHAEL J A certain parcel ol land 
containing 30843 (1791 sqft) square 
feel with buildings Ihereon situated 
upon the westerly side ol Hancock St 
and the southerly side of Oimmock SI 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Plot 2/1 Plan 1151 Unit #210-212 
Parcel #030090 Tax ol 1989 $4563 94 

ONEILL FREDERICK M 4 KELLY 
PETER TREES CD KELLY RLTY 
TRUS A cerlain parcel ol land 
containing 7918 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Collage Ave Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
B/A Plot 35/34 Plan 1142 Parcel 
#004688 Tax of 1989 $1 1565 51 

OLEARY DANIEL (SIK YUl MOY) A 
certain parcel of land containing 2806 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side ol 
Billings Road Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 258B Plot 24 
Plan 601 1 Parcel #018858 Tax ol 1989 
$755 20 

OSBORNE DOROTHY L A certain 
parcel of land containing 1 9440 square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the westerly side ol Terne Rd 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lol E/F Plot 10/11 Plan 1093 Parcel 
#031247 Tax ol 1989 $584 43 

PALAZA AUGUSTUS J 4 UX JUDITH 
A certain parcel ol land containing 
11600 square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the easterly side 
of Copeland Street Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Plot 13 Plan 401 3 
Parcel #010926 Tax ol 1989 $1410 48 
and lor water lien $99 32 

PAPOUTSY RUTH KATHRYN A 
certain parcel of land containing 7410 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side ol 
Puntan Drive Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 32 Plot 24 Plan 
1194E Parcel #005881 Tax ol 1989 
$13327 

PEKKANEN WILLIAM 4 UX AINO A 
certain parcel ol land containing 6050 
square leet with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the southerly side ol 
Nightingale Ave Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot A Plot 47 Plan 
3071 Parcel #010142 Tax ol 1989 
$851 02 and lor water lien $26 00 

PEPE LOUIS S & UX TERESA M A 
certain parcel ol land containing 4152 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the westerly side ol Nut 
Island Ave Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lo< pt 8 Plot 3 Plan 
1004 Parcel #000054 Tax ol 1989 
$718 52 and for water lien $124 15 

PERELLA DIANE TREE QUINOR 
TRUST (HANCOCK 1450 REALTY 
TRUST-STEVEN B KOENIG. ROCCO 
J SALVATORA TREES) A certain 
parcel of land containing 12616 square 
leet with buildings Ihereon situated 
jpon the easterly side ol Hancock St 
Being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot B1/B2 Plot 17/18 Plan 1140 
Parcel #004669 Tax ol 1989 $12645 49 

RICCIAHDI PAUL. STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1054-68 sqft) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#806-11, northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #031180 TaxoM989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (775 53 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St. northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#920-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St.Beino desianated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031214 Tax ol 1989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (106144 sqft) 
square feel with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#6ll-1l northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016 
2018/2017 Parcel #031145 Taxol 1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F . TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 521168 519308 (1060 91 
sq 11 I square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northeasterly 
side ol Shea St . northwesterly side ol 
200 Cove Way U#811-1l. and the 
northwesterly side ol Mound St being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
1 pt 18/pt 19/pt 19 3/1 Plot 1 16/3 14 
3 2 Plan 20162018 2017 Parcel 
•031185 Taxol 1989 $1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1062 83 sq ft i 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon thf> northeasterly side of 
Shea St.. northwailerly side ol 200 
Cove Way LW805-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19 pt 
19/3 1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016. 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 179 Taxol 1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing S19308 (1066 22 sqft) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»919-ll. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lol pt 18/pl 19/pl 
19 3/1 Plot 1 16/3 14/3 2 Plan 20ia 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031213 Tax 011969 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcM ci land 



containing 519300 (1064 76 tq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thareon 
situated upon the northeaslarly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly sida of 200 
Cove Way U»417-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 110 Tax of 1989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1057 50 
sq It ) square leet with buildings 
Ihereon situated upon the north- 
easterly side ol Shea St , northwesterly 
ol 200 Cove Way U#804-11 
northwesterly side ol Mound St Being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lol 
pt 18/pt 19/pl 19/3/1 Pk)l 1 16/3/14/3/2 
Plan 2016/ 2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 178 
Tax ol 1989 $1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1055 18 sq ft I 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#918-ll, northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031212 Taxol 1989 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1072 85 sqft) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#803-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound SI Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
201 8/ 201 7 Parcel #03 1 1 77 Tax ol 1 989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1069 31 sqft). 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#917-11, northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031211 Taxol 1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 51930B (1046 92 sq It ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#916-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031210 Tax of 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (105102 sqft) 
square feel with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St. northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U»4 14-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031107 Tax of 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing S19308 (773 96 sq ft ) 
square feel with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#801-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being desianated nn 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt IB/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031175 Taxol 19e9 
$1211 87 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1058 37 sq 11 ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»915-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lol pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19 3/1 Plot 1 16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016- 
2018 2017 Parcel #031209 Taxol 1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1050 70 sqft) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#9i4-ll northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt 18.pl 19.pl 
19 3 1 Plot 1/16 314/3 2 Plan 2016/ 
2018 2017 Parcel #031208 Taxol 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land ^ 
containing 519308 (1063 78 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»719-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19'Pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1 16/3 14 3 2 Plan 2016. 
2018/ 2017Parcel #031173 Taxol 1989 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (775 60 sqft) 
square feel with txiildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»9l3-il. northwesterly 
side ol Mound SI Being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lol pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/31 Plot 1 16/314 3/2 Plan 2014/ 
2014 2017 Parcel #031207 Taxol 1969 
$121946 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 

(Cont'd on Page 24) 



Piflr 24 Qvincy S«n TIliirMiajr, January II, I99t 



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(Cont'd from Page 23) 

containing S19306 (10S5 96 aq It ) 
•guar* toat with buiMingt Iharaon 
•Hualad upon tha nofthaai larly aida ol 
Shaa St, nonh««aatarly «i<ta ol 200 
Cova Way Ut71S-11. northwaatarly 
iMa ol Mound St Baing daalgnatad on 
Aaaaaaor-a Plan at Lot pt i8/pt 19/pt 
191^1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2016/ 201 7 Parcal •001172 Tax 011969 
$134649 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A cartain parcal ol land 
containing 519306 (700 16 tq It ) 
square laat with buildings thareon 
tituatad upon tha northaasterly sida ol 
Shaa St . northweaterly lida ol 200 
Cova Way U«217A-11. northwesterly 
SKla ol Mound St Batna dasionated on 
Aaaaaaor's Plan at Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19^/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
201&' 2017 Parcel *031069 Tax ol 1989 
$1041 10 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A cartain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (106880 sq It ) 
square leat with Ixiildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shaa St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»717-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Asaaasor-s Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel »031 171 Tax ol 1989 
$1356 06 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (3779 sq It ) square 
laat with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northaaaterly side ol Shea 
St, northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way UilOOe. northwesterly side ol 
Mound St. Being designated on 
Assaasor-t Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #030279 Tax ol 1989 
$353821 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1061 16 sq It ) 
square laat with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shaa St.. northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way Ua911-11, northwesterly 
aide ol Mound St Being designated on 
Asaeaaor't Plan at Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel 11031205 Tax ol 1989 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F. TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (104014 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U«716-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #031 170 Tax ol 1989 
$1334 58 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (773 32 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly sideol 
Shea St. northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way Ut216A-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assesaor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel «031 067 Tax 011989 
$1041 10 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSn-S CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A ctrlain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1070 sq It ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northeasterly side ol Shea 
St. northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way UatOOS. northwesterly side ol 
Mound St Being designated on 
Aaaeasor-s Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #030278 Tax 011989 
$1397 83 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1069 sq It ) square 
laet with buildings thereon situated 
upon ttie norttteasterly side ol Shea 
St . northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way U#1004. northwesterly side ol 
Mound St Being designated on 
Aaseasor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #030277 Tax ol 1989 
$1397 83 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1054 99 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings ttiereon 
situated upon ttte northeaaterly side ol 
Shaa St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#909-11. northwesterly 
aide ol Mound St Being designated on 
Aatetaor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031203 Tax 011969 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1050 69 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings tliereon 
aituatad upon the northeasterly side of 
Shaa St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#714-1t. northwesterly 
aide ol Mound SI Being designated on 
Aaaaaaor's Plan aa Lot pt 16/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
3018/ 2017 Parcel #031168 

Tax ol 1969 $1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain pvcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1056 98 sq It ) 
square taet with buildings thereon 
•Mualad upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St. northweaterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#908-11. northwesterly 
aide ol Mound St Bemg designated on 
Aa a aaaor's Plan aa Lot pt ia/pt 19/pt 
la/tH Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2O16/2017PircelaO3l2O2 Taxol19e9 
$1490 17 

niCClARDI PAUL STEPHEN C 
^AIM. F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A eenam parcel ol land 



containing 519308 (775 47 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#520-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Asiessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 133 Tax 011989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (778 89 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 2(X) 
Cove Way U#213-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt ie/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017Parcel#031064 Tax 011989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1067 03 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»907-11. northwesterly 
sideol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017Parcel#031201 Taxol1989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1063 48 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U*S19-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 132 Tax ol 1989 
$134849 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (105592 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#90&-11, northwesterly 
tide ol Mound St. Being designated on 
Aateator's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt. 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031200 Taxol1969 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcal ol land 
containing 519308 (775 87 sq It.) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#1020-11. northwesterly 
aide ol Mound St Being designated on 
Aaaaaaor's Plan as Lot pt. 18/pt. 19/pt. 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2016/ 201 7 Parcel #031 234 Tax ol 1989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1062 37 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#905-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 199 Tax o( 1989 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1067 64 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U«1019-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031233 Taxol1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (773 32 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon tt>e northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#517-t1. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot ptie/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 130 Taxol 1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1054 61 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»904-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt ie/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 198 Tax 011989 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1082 09 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon ttie northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U*516-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt ie/pt t9/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
20ie/2017Parcel«031129 Taxol 1989 
$1363 67 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A cartain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1072 92 sq It ) 
square laet with l>uildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 2(X) 
Cove Way U»903-11 northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Aaseasor's Plan as Lot pt l8/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017Parcel#031197 Taxol1969 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1056 91 aq ft ) 
square leat with buiMmga tt«eraon 
eHuatad upon the northeealerly tide ol 



Shea St , northweaterly aide ol 200 
Cove Way U»515-1t, norlhwaiterly 
tide ol Mound St Being deaignated on 
Astassor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcal #031 128 Taxol 1969 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519306 (1057.17 sq.ft I 
square leet with buildinga thereon 
situated upon tha northeaaterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#902-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mou nd St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 196 Taxol 1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (105146 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#514-11. northwesterly 
sideol Mound St Being desianated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 127 Tax 011989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1067 81 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way Uii707-ll. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt IS/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031161 Taxol 1989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1069 sq It ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northeasterly side ol Shea 
St . northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way U#906. northwesterly side ol 
Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #030269 Tax ol 1989 
$1397 83 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (777 16 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St, northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#901-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #031 195 Tax ol 1989 
$121946 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (775 48 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#820-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
201 8/ 201 7 Parcel #03 1 1 94 Tax ol 1 989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (105516 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St. northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#318-1l. northwesterly 
side of Mound St. Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #031091 Taxol 1989 
$1346 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1064 74 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ot 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#819-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Beinq designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031193 
Taxol 1989 $1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1055 47 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U»818-1l, northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 192 Tax of 1989 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1068 91 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#817-11. northwesterly 
sideol Mound St Being designated on 
Attessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 191 Taxol 1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1047 26 sq ft ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northweaterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#816-t1. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assettor's Plan as Lot pt t8/pt t9/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
20 18/ 20 17 Par eel #03 II 90 Taxol 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (775 08 sq M ) 
square leet with buildings ttiereon 
situated upon lt>e northeasterly side of 
Shea St northweaterly tide of 200 



Cove Way U#7Q1-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Aasettor't Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 155 Tax ol 1989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A cartain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (105868 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#815-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot ol 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plol 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
201 8/ 201 7 Parcel #031 1 89 Tax of 1 989 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (775 29 sq ft | 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U»620-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017 Parcel #031 154 Tax ol 1989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1050 90 sq ft ) 
square feel with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#814-11. northwesterly 
sideol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot ptt8/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 188 Taxol 1969 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1064 41 sq 11 ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St,, northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»619-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017Parcel»031153 Taxol 1989 
$134849 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C PAUL 
F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS COVE 
TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (775 56 sq It) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#813-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 187 Tax of 1989 
$1100 55 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (106087 si) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated upon 
the northeasterly side ol Shea St 
northwesterly side of 200 Cove Way 
U#311-1t. northwesterly side of 
Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031084 Tax of 1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C, 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1055 43 sq ft I 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U»618-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017Parcel #031152 Taxol 1989 
$1332 05 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1069 25 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St , northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#617-ll, northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031 1 51 Tax of 1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1069 43 sq ft ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#117-11, northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Beinq designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plol 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031048 Tax of 1989 
$1356 08 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1047 36 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ot 200 
Cove Way U#616-11. northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
201 8/ 201 7 Parcel #031 150 Taxol 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1057 18 sq It ) 
sp'iare leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#1004-11, northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/201 7 Parcel #031218 Tax ol 1989 
$1378 85 

RICCIARDI PAUL STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (105817 sq It I 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cova Way U#615-t1. northwesterly 
tide ol Mound St Being designated on 
Attestor's PIM< as Lot pt t8/pl 19/pl 



19/3/1 Plol 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 149 Taxol 1989 
$1348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C. 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol l3nd 
containing 519308 (1055 74 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#809-11, northwesterly 
side ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/2017Parcel#031183 Taxol1989 
$1490 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1072 94 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea SI . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way U#1003H, northwesterly 
side ot Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pi 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017Parcel #031217 Tax of 1989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (105134 sq ft ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»614-11, northwesterly 
sideol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 148 Tax ol 1989 
$1481 32 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (105143 sq ft ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea SI . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U«1 14-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Beinq designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1-16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031045 Taxol 1989 
$1342 17 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (1057 01 sq ft ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»1002-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot pi 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031216 Taxol 1989 
$149017 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1075 sq ft 1 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northeasterly side ol Shea 
St . northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way U#802. northwesterly side ol 
Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pl 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #030255 Tax oil 989 
$1405 42 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1067 83 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St , northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U#807-11. northwesterly 
sideol Mound SI Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plol 116/314/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031 181 Taxoll989 
$1497 76 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of la.nd 
containing 519308 (772 77) sq ft) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side of 200 
Cove Way UmOOl-n. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pi 18/pt 19''pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel «03t215 Taxol 1989 
$1211,87 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (1063 54 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings Ihereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove Way U»419-11 northwesterly 
side of Mound SI Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #03112 Taxol 1989 
SI 348 49 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST 519308 (776 92 sq fl ) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 2(X) 
Cove Way Uni 12-11. northwesterly 
side of Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/ 201 7 Parcel #031043 Taxof1989 
$121946 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel of land 
containing 519308 (773 32 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Shea St , northwesterly side ot 200 
Cove Way U«106-ll, northwesterly side 
ol Mound St Being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot pt 18/pl 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16'3 14/3/2 Plan 2016 
2018/ 2017 Parcel #031037 Taxol 1989 
$1211 87 

RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C , 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (775 96 sq It ) 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Shea St . northwesterly side ol 200 
Cove W«y U»113-11. northwesterly 
tide ol Mound SI Being designated on 
Assettor's Plan at Lot pt 18/pt 19/pt 
19/3/1 Plot 1/16/3/14/3/2 Plan 2016/ 
2018/20t7Parcel#031044 Taxol 1989 
$1100 55 



RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . 
PAUL F TRUSTEES CAPTAINS 
COVE TRUST A certain parcel ol land 
containing 519308 (654 sq ft ) square 
leet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northeasterly side ol Shea 
St. northwesterly side ol 200 Cove 
Way U#101A and northwesterly sideol 
Mound St being designated on 
pt 19/1/3 Plot 16/14/3/2/1/3 Plan 
2016/2018/201 7/Parcel #030182 Tax 
ol 1989 $1066 40 

RICCIARDI PAUL, STEPHEN C . & 
PAUL TRS QUARRY STREET 
ASSOC A certain parcel of land 
containing (3,278,969) square leet 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
193 Quarry St ( — 323) Being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lol 
39/pt 43/80/pl 1/pt 31/2/4/pt 5 Plol 
68/45/22/54/34/53/74/78 Plan 
1192D/E/1195C/1192B/1195A North- 
easterly side ol Quarry bounded 
northwesterly by Montani Realty Trust. 
westerly by Montani Really Trust. 
southwesterly by Monlai Realty Trust, 
southeasterly by Montani Rally Trust. 
southwesterly by Francis P 
DiFederico et ux Deborah A , westerly 
by James S Curran and Rose Mary 
Venavich and Mary T Lomasney 
Mane T Lomasney, northerly by Kevin 
Nahia Quoe Lam & Ann Kylram Lam 
and Kazimierz lluicki & Mane lluicki 
and Stephen J Ledroneel ux LynneM 
and Rolando F Estanislao et u« 
Elizabeth 8 . westerly by Rolando F 
Estanislao el ux Elizabeth 8 and 
Ciriaco B Soricelli e! ux Olga C , 
northerly by Paul M Holland et ux 
Susan P and Ulberto Moniz, Maria 
Moniz Edgardo Gafanhao and Ouang 
Duong el ux Van Vuong and Edilh R 
Beck and Jean E Sproule and Helen V 
O'Conner, Anna C McCarthy and 
John J Haines et ux Pamela J and 
Carole M Kane and Neil M Kerslem, 
Judith Cullen Kerstein and Jaro REally 
Trust, easterly by Anna M Palmisano. 
Josephine J , northerly by Anna M 
Palmisano. Josephine J , easterly by 
Mount Ararat and Private Way, 
northerly by Private Way. easterly by 
Marek A Catner. northerly by Marek A 
Catner and Ernest J Lanandeao Jr . 
Gail M Omegro. northerly by Zenon 
Gogola and Arthur F Good et ux Mary 
C and City of Qumcy, easterly by 
Leslie Ann Libertine and Curtis SI and 
Curtis TRust and Louis C Larson et ux 
Eleanor M and Daniel G Raymondi et 
ux Sharon T , northerly by Daniel G 
Raymondi et ux Sharon T . westerly by 
Daniel G Raymond et ux Sharon T 
and Louis C Larson el ux Eleanor M , 
northerly by Gino DiCroci el ux Helen 
L & Thomas S Cnsman, Paulette 
Anderson and David Philip et ux Helen 
A westerly and David Philip et ux 
Helen A . northerly by Breda O Conner 
and John M Marrone Tree Curtis St 
Realty Trust and Andrew V Pnoli. 
easterly by Ferdinand Calmbach et ux 
Evelyn. Northerly by Ferdinand 
Calmbach el ux Evelyn, westerly by 
Ferdinand Calmbach et ux Evelyn, 
northerly by Nilsen Ave and Timothy 
J Foley el ux Andrea L , easterly by 
North Commons Really Trust, 
northerly by North Commons Realty 
Trust and Private Way, westerly by 
Private Way northerly by Milton Realty 
Trust westerly by Milton Realty Trust 
northerly by Richard J Fitzmaunce et 
ux Bernadette J and Leo J Rubmo et 
ux Eleanora L and James W Reidy, 
Maureen J Reidy and Mieczyslaw 
Krasinski et ux Grazyna and Herbert 
Edgren and Peter K Anderson et ux 
Joan '. int Paul Paquinetux Sandra '.• 
int andGuslalH Wallin et ux Ethel D 
and Carl F Johnson el ux Dorothy L 
and Rosemarie G McNamara and 
Joseph N Lenehan Jr et ux Ruth M , 
easterly by Theresa M Dargin and 
KSM Trust and Khaled Y About Zaki et 
ux Susan and Carolyn Donahue 
northerly by Carolyn Donahue, 
easterly by Scotch Pond Place, 
northerly by Scotch Pond Place and 
Marlon A Callaghan Maureen C 
Lamb and Joseph P Matthews el Ad 
Wilda M and Arthur E Johnson el ux 
Barbara and Paul H Faleyet ux Teresa 
M . easterly by City of Ouincy 
southerly by William A Blanchette and 
Parker Street and William P Gilcome 
and Ernest Light et ux Mane E and 
Packards Lane and James D Siratton. 
Elizabeth A Dennis, easterly by James 
D Siratton Elizabeth A Dennis and 
John A Manila et ux Janice G . 
northerly and John A Manlia et ux 
Janice G , easterly by John A Mantia 
et ux Janice G and Shirley M Reeves, 
southeasterly by City of Quincy and 
Catadio Ignagni, southerly by Catadio 
Ignagni and Duncan J MacCallumand 
Paul Mahoney, Joseph M Mahoney. 
westerly by William F Farrell et ux 
Mary L southerly by William F Farrell 
et ux Mary L and James Boyages and 
John L Snell et Anna E Snell and 
Albert L Weaver et ux Elizabeth A , 
westerly by Lizzie Nylund. Lnsa 
Frednckson and Harold S Peterson et 
ux Ruth A , southeasterly by Harodl S 
Peterson et ux Ruth A . southwesterly 
by Harold S Peterson et ux Ruth A , 
southeasterly by Harold S Peterson et 
ux Ruth A , southwesterly by Quarry 
St Parcel #006012 Tax ol 198S 
$42446 84 

T C 121845 
T C on Lot pt 1 only 
RICCIARDI PAUL. STEPHEN C & 
PAUL F TREE FORUM TRUST A 
certain parcel ol land containing 6080 
sf (12097 sq II ) square leet w«h buildmgs 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side ol Saville Ave Being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Plot 3 Plan 1 128 
(now 3/4/32 - 1128) Parcel #004465 
For water lien $311 00 

RICCIARDI PAUL TREE OF 
GREENLEAF REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel ot land containing 
(49 119) (880 40 sq It ) square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side ol Willard St U#GD. and 
southerly tide ol Robertson St Tax ol 
t>eing designated on Assettor's Plan 
as Plot 1 Plan 4080 Parcel #019108 
Tax ot 1989 $845 08 

RICHMOND STEPHEN K (KAHI-ANN 
REALTY TRUST PAT GAOUIN TREE) 
A certain parcel of land containing 
8129 square leet with buildings 
ttiereon situated upon tt>e northerly 
side ol Border St and southerly sideol 
Shepard St iMing dewgnated on 

(Cont'd on Page 25) 




Thursday, January II, 199* Quincy Sun Pa|e 25 



LEGAL NOTICE 

(Cont'd from Page 24) 

Assessor's Plan as Lot 24/25/26/27/28/ 
<>9 Plot 50/47 Plan 61 01 A Parcel 
»021555 Tax o( 1989 $1703 96 

RIZZO LOUIS & UX ELAINE G A 
certain parcel of land containing 1 1437 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southeasterly side of 
Shore Ave and westerly side of 
Virginia Rd being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 141 F Plot 10 
Plan 1105U Parcel »003899 Tax of 
1989 $906 37 

ROBERTS fl JAI^ES TRUSTEE OF 
AZNAVORIAN REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel of land containing %94 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side of 
Copeland St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 Plot 8 Plan 
4021 Parcel «01 1060 bounded easterly 
by land now or late of Private Way and 
Bay Colony Properties, southerly by 
land now or late of Aznavornian Realty 
Trust and Albert A Vaughn, westerly 
by land now or late of Kanstantions 
Papadopoulos, Paulene Papadopoulos 
and northerly by Copeland Tax of 
1989 $450562 and for water lien 
$1475 18 

TC 129584 

ROCHE DANIEL & UX ESTHER K A 
certain parcel of land containing 
(9632) square feel with buildings 
Ihereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Brown St , northerly side of 
Amherst St and Westerly side of Rock 
Island Rd being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 39'40/41 Plot 
39/40/41 Plan 1057B Parcel «<001078 
Tax of 1989 $180 90 

ROCHE JOHNS 4 UX RUTH A certain 
parcel of land containing 5302 square 
leet with buildings Ihereon situated 
upon the northeasterly side of Palmer 
St and the northwesterly side of Roach 
St t>eing designated on Assessor's 
Plan as Lot pt 7 Plot 1 1 Plan 1077K 
Parcel #002353 bounded north- 
westerly by land now or late of Thomas 
F Hines et ux Mary M , northeasterly 
by land now or late of Harold F Gove et 
UX Edna L , southeasterly by land now 
or late of Roach St , and southwesterly 
by Palmer St Tax of 1989 $418 02 

TC »35516 

ROCKWELL SUSAN R TREE OF 
LYMAN PROPERTIES TRUST A 
certain parcel of land containing 
1214845 square feet with buildings 
Ihereon situated upon the northerly 
side of rear Ricciuti Drive being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Plot 
17 Plan 4126 Parcel #013555 bounded 
northerly by land now or late ol Milton 
Town Line, easterly by land now or late 
ol the Cunningham Foundation of 
Milton and Lyman Properties Trust, 
northerly by land now or lale of Lyman 
Properties Trust, easterly by land now 
or late of The Cunningham Foundation 
of Milton and The City of Quincy, 
westerly by land now or late of City of 
Quincy and northerly by Milton Town 
Line Tax o( 1989 $26098 70 

TC #123447 

ROCKWELL SUSAN R TREE OF 
LYMAN PROPERTIES TRUST A 
certain parcel ol land containing 
372438 square feet situated upon the 
northerly side of rear Ricciuti Drive 
being designated on Assessor s Plan 
as Plot 15 Plan 4126 Parcel #013554 
Tax of 1989 $14450 41 

ROSENFIELD JOSEPH & UX MARIE & 
STACKHOUSE BARBRA LEE A 
certain parcel of land containing 6400 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northerly side of 
Channing Si being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 81 5A 8158 Plot 
34 Plan 6016 Parcel #018956 Tax of 
1980 $1307 52 

ROSS CHARLES & UX JENNIE B A 
certain parcel of land containing 3200 
square feel with buildings thereon 
situated upon the westerly side of 
Division St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 336 Plot 1 1 Plan 
6155 Parcel #022896 bounded 
southerly by land now or lale of John 
D Harrington et ux Frances M 
westerly by land now or late ol Willis F 
McGue et UX Mane C northerly by 
land now or late of Kevin F Malone, 
Nancy M Malone and easterly by 
Division St Tax of 1989 $35 70 

T C #93694 

RUFFINI ROBERTO A certain parcel 
of land containing 7500 square feet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the easterly side of Hull St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
162 pt 102 Plot 132 Plan 1025 Parcel 
•000425 Tax of 1989 $996 82 

RUFFINI ROBERTO M A certain 
parcel of land containing 5000 square 
feet situated upon the southerly side of 
Lenox St being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 623'624 Plot 18 
Plan 1074 Parcel #001683 Tax of 1989 
$254 27 

RUFFINI ROBERTO M A certain 
parcel of land containing 5000 square 
feet situated upon the southerly side of 
Lenox St being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Lot 622/621 Plot 
16/42 Plan 1074 Parcel #001681 Tax ol 
1989 $254 27 

RUFFINI ROBERTO M TREE 
RUFFINI REALTY TRUST A certain 
parcel of land containing 6000 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the westerly side of Hull St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
11/12 Plot 131 Plan 1025 Parcel 
#030020 Tax of 1989 $1249 82 and for 
water hen $135 43 

RUFFINI ROBERTO M TREE 
RUFFINI REALTY TRUST A certain 
parcel of land containing 7500 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the easterly side of Hull St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 102/101 Plot 133 Plan 1025 Parcel 
#000426 Tax of 1989 $1388 97 

and for water lien $54 17 

RUFFINI SUSAN A certain parcel of 
land containing 5000 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Hull St being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Lot 
100 Plot 15 Plan 1025 Parcel #000427 
Tax of 1989 $1237 17 and lor water hen 
$123 27 

RYAN BRENDAN P * UX ARLENE M 
A certain parcel of land containing 
6480 square leet with buildings 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



thereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Buckingham Rd being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
76/pt77 Plot 7 Plan 501 6C Parcel 
#013955 Tax of 1989 $1652 09 and for 
water lien $235 92 

RYAN WILLIAM P & MAUDE E 
(WILLIAM P RYAN ET UX THERESA 
K RYAN) A certain parcel of land 
containing 3600 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southwesterly side of Lawn Ave being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
2414A Plot 14 Plan 2003A Parcel 
#006062 Tax ol 1989 $1313 07 and for 
water lien $257 72 

SANDISON ESTHER W A certain 
parcel of land containing 8986 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northeast side of Palmer 
St t>eing designated on Assessor's 
Plan as Lot 221/222 Plot 20 Plan 1077C 
Parcel #002225 Tax of 1989 $91301 
and for water hen $47 88 

SCALATA CHARLES J & UX RUTH A 
A certain parcel of land containing 
6600 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the northerly 
side of Liberty St and the 
southwesterly side of Tabor St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
100 Plot 12 Plan 3081 Parcel #010264 
Tax of 1989 $1617 94 and for water hen 
$199 32 

SEARLES ELBERT L SUXELISEM A 
certain parcel of land containing 
(268.765) (760 sq ft ) square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of 542 E Squantum St 
U316W being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 30 Plot 54 Plan 
6076 Parcel #031514 bounded 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Victory Rd . northerly by land now or 
late of Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northerly by land now or late of Boston 
Harbor Marina Co , northeasterly by 
land now or late of Boston Harbor 
Marina Co . northwesterly by land now 
or late of Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
nonherly by land now or late of Boston 
Harbor Marina Co , northeasterly by 
land now or late of Boston Harbor 
Marina Co , southeasterly by land now 
or late of Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co , 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Harbourside Condominiums 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Boston Harbor Marina Co Tax of 1989 
$1324 46 

T C #C193 

SERAFINI MARIO & UX JOYCE C A 
certain parcel of land containing 6473 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Elm Ave and the northwesterly side ol 
Marlboro St being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 238 Plot 1 Plan 
5037 Parcel #014520 Tax of 1989 
$651 94 

sferrazza robert 8, ux denise 
(McCarthy joseph m 4 ux joan 

M ) A certain parcel of land containing 
6700 square feet situated upon the 
southerly side of Crescent St being 
designated on Assessors Plan as Plot 
7 Plan 4052 Parcel #011856 Tax ol 
1989 $303 60 

SHEA MICHAEL P, STEPHEN R 
FOLLANSBEE TREES OF S 4 F 
REALTY TRUST A certain parcel of 
land containing 5000 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Satford Street being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
101 1 Plot 23 Plan 61 10 Parcel #021827 
Tax ol 1989 $1931 66 and for water lien 
$787 07 

SHERIDAN RICHARD T & UX 
KATHLEEN A A certain parcel of land 
containing 5354 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Deertield St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
889A Plot 38 Plan 6124A Parcel 
#02270 bounded southerly by land 
now or late of William A Wysocki et ux 
Maureen, westerly by land now or late 
of Ann Justine Lewis 4 Alice J 
McLennan. Edith P McLennan, 
northerly by land now or late of Robert 
J McNeice, Daniel J McNeice Jr and 
easterly by Deerfield St Tax of 1989 
$1416 80 and for water hen $135 43 

TC#111716 

SHUMAN JOSEPH G SR 4 UX 
DOROTHY L A certain parcel of land 
containing 6316 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side of Lind St and the 
westerly side of Bethel Terr being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
94 95 Plot 94 95 Plan 10771 Parcel 
#002335 Tax of 1989 $723 96 

SILBERT DAVID M TREE OF S 4 D 
REALTY TRUST A certain parcel of 
land containing 97637 (644 sq fl j 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the southerly side of 
Comm Shea Blvd #810 and the 
southerly side of right of Right of Way 
being designated un Assessors Plan 
as Lot 12/A Plot 3914 Plan 6075 Parcel 
#030573 bounded easterly by land 
now or late of Right of Way, southerly 
by land now or late of Right of Way, 
and Squantum Realty Trust and 
M D C , westerly by land now or late of 
Waterview Inc , Niles Development 
Associates Inc and northerly by 
Commander Shea Blvd and Right of 
Way Tax of 1989 $761 53 

TC#C130 
T C on Lot 12 only 

SILVER BENTON 4 UX SHIRLEY 
(SHIRLEY SILVER) A certain parcel of 
land containing 7898 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Priscilla Lane being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot 
116/82B Plot 63/64 Plan 1194D/E 
Parcel 005904 bounded southerly by 
land now or late of Stephen W 
Lenhardt et ux Sally K , westerly by 
land now or late of Frederick A Cohen 
et UX Marcia S northerly by land now 
or late of Charles Spilzer et ux 
Stephanie and easterly by Priscilla 
Lane Tax of 1989 $2070 81 and for 
water lien $168 16 

TC«130068 



SMAHA EMIL « UX HELEN M A 
certain parcel of land containing 7705 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northerly side ol 
Brooks Ave being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 178A Plot 46 
Plan 3071 Parcel #010141 Tax of 1989 
$1168 86 

SMITH BEVERLY V A certain parcel of 
land containing 13216 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Bellevue Rd and 
nonherly side of Seal Rock Lane being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 1 
Plot 1/12 Plan 6081 Parcel #021231 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Jack J Green et ux Joyce E and 
Harry H Holmes, easterly by land now 
or late of Lorrel B Nichols et ux 
Eleanor B . southerly by land now or 
late of Seal Rock Lane and westerly by 
Bellevue Rd Tax of 1989 $75 89 

TC #118489 

SMITH MICHAEL J TREE 280 
FAYETTE STREET TRUSTA certain 
parcel of land containing 5000 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the easterly side of Fayette St 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot 4 Plot 11 Plan 5113 Parcel 
#016456 Tax of 1989 $1 135 97 

SORICELLI CIRIACO (DIMITRIOUS 
SPILIAKOS) A certain parcel of land 
containing 10000 square feet situated 
upon the easterly side of Cleaves SI 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot 137/138 Plot 20/21 Plan 5061 
Parcel #015104 Tax of 1989 $277 04 

SOUSA JOSEPH 4 UX FRANCES C A 
certain parcel of land containing 8400 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the westerly side of 
Lakeside Ave and the easterly side of 
Winthrop St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 2/1 Plot 80/18 
Plan 1058 Parcel #001250 bounded 
southerly by land now or late of Sandra 
M Doyle, westerly by land now or late 
of William K Gardner et ux Jacqueline, 
southerly by land now or late of 
William K Gardner et ux Jacqueline, 
westerly by Winthrop St , northerly by 
land now or late of Maureen T Sullivan 
and Taeseon Jeon and easterly bv 
Lakeside Ave Tax of 1989 >t>oo u£ 

TC#92796 

SPILIAKOS DIMITRIOS TRUSTEE OF 
THE 47 MASS AVE REALTY TRUST A 
certain parcel of land containing 3850 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side of 
Massachusetts AVe being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Lot 135/134 Plot 
14 Plan 2049 Parcel #007263 bounded 
nonherly by land now or late of Joseph 
Montello et ux Anne T , easterly by 
land now or late of Peter DeCristofaro 
et ux Mary C . southerly by land now or 
late of Camilla DelVerchio et ux Trieste 
and westerly by Massachusetts Ave 

Tax of 1989 $2676 09 and for water lien 

$10180 

TC #125885 

SPILIAKOS MARIA K A cenain parcel 
of land containing 5000 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the northwesterly side of East Elm 
Avenue being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot 619 Plot 1 1 Plan 
5054 Parcel #014841 Tax of 1989 
$1 798 83 and for water hen $52 33 

STAFFORD MARY M A certain parcel 
of land containing 4385 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the northerly (rear) side of Bay View 
Ave being designated on Assessor's 
Plan as Lot C Plot 27 Plan 1008 Parcel 
#000151 Tax ol 1989 $958 87 and for 
water hen $135 43 

STETLER DARLENE AF/K/A 
DARLENE HARTFORD 4 STETLER 
HOWARD J A certain parcel of land 
containing 6703 square feet with 
' buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side of Sea St and the 
easterly side of Manet Ave being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 52/pt 53/pt 54 Plot 22 Plan 10571 
Parcel #001150 Tax ol 1989 $1645 07 
and for water lien $135 43 

STIDLING MAETHA S A certain parcel 
of land containing 8834 square leet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the northerly side ol Brooks Avenue 
t>eing designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot ptl77A/3 Plot 61 Plan 3071 
Parcel #010155 Tax of 1989 $738 80 

SULGER JOHN MA certain parcel of 
land containing 6000 square feel with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Briggs Street being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
64/pl63 Plot 5 Plan 5044 Parcel 
#014648 Tax of 1989 $751 41 

SULLIVAN MAUREEN TA certain 
parcel of land containing 9100 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the easterly side of Winthrop St 
and southeiiy side ol Lakeside Ave 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Lot 63/62/61 Plot 21/20/19 Plan 
1058 Parcel #001215 Tax of 1989 
$1187 84 and for water hen $173 80 

TAYLOR ELIZABETH A A certain 
parcel of land containing 4038 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the northerly side of 
Washington St and westerly side of 
Shaw St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 15 Plot 18 Plan 
2011 Parcel #006274 Tax of 1989 
$1222 83 

THOMAS JAMES 4 UX RUTH G B 
(SOUTH STREET TRUST. LEO E 
MARTIN JR TREE)A certain parcel Of 
land containing 8140 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of South St being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Plot 
5 Plan 2072 Parcel #008025 Tax of 1989 
$1165 06 

THORS GEOFFREY D TRUSTEE 
AVENUE REALTY TRUSTA certain 
parcel of land containing (21.600) 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side ol 
Quincy Ave U#603 being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Plot 45 Plan 
2084C Parcel #031369 Tax of 1989 
$7 93 

THORS GEOFFREY D TRUSTEE 
AVENUE REALTY TRUSTA certain 
pkrcel of land containing (21.600) 
square feel with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northeasterly side of 
Quincy Ave U#604 being designated 
on Assessor's Plan as Plot 45 Plan 



2084C Parcel #031370 Tax of 1989 
$7 93 

TRAINOR JOHN E A certain parcel of 
land containing 10952 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
southerly side of Faxon Rd and 
easterly side of Henry St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
pt 77/78 Plot 1 Plan 6021 Parcel 
#019376 Tax of 1989 $2169 48 and for 
water lien $168 16 

TULMAN MICHAEL M 4 LOWENSTEIN 
GARY S TREES EAST MILTON 
FINANCIAL REALTY TRUST A certain 
parcel of land containing 25620 square 
feet with buildings thereon situated 
upon the easterly side of Willard St 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Plot 4/5 Plan 4078 Parcel #012750 
Tax of 1989 $17235 49 

TUNG VAN NGUYEN 4 UX TAM CAM 
LUU A certain parcel ol land 
containing 5000 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
easterly side of Rawson Rd being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
274 Plot 19 Plan 5006 Parcel #030908 
Tax of 1989 $26 57 

VARRASSO PETER C TRUSTEE OF 
64 ROGERS STREET TRUST (PAUL 
P PALUZZI ET UX MARGARETT) A 
certain parcel of land containing 13954 
square leet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the westerly and 
southerly side of Rogers Street being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
2/pt 3 Plot 9 Plan 4067 Parcel #012216 
Tax of 1989 $124 85 

WAINWRIGHT PHILIP B JR 4 UX 
SALLY K A certain parcel of land 
containing 9900 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westerly side of Lansdowne St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
A/B Plot 1 Plan 6080T Parcel #021161 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Anthony Wine, westerly by land now 
or late of Anthony Wine, southerly by 
land now or late of Douglass R Randall 
et ux Louise E and easterly by 
Lansdowne St Tax of 1989 $746 35 

TC #64014 

WALSH THOMAS F 4 UX JANICEA 
certain parcel of land containing 270 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the easterly side of 
Safford St being designated on 
Assessor's Plan as Lot 2A Plot 27 Plan 
5131 Parcel #016785 Tax of 1989 
$30 36 

WESTLAND ROBERT M 4 UX MARY 
LA certain parcel of land containing 
6600 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Buckley Street being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot G 
Plot 3 Plan 401 1 Parcel #01 0864 Tax of 
1989 $1698 90 and for water hen 
$230 38 

WESTLAND ROBERT M 4 UX MARY 
L 4 CATHERINE A certain parcel of 
land containing 6600 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
westrly side of Buckley St being 
designated on Assessor s Plan as Lot F 
Plot 2 Plan 401 1 Parcel #010857 Tax ol 
1989 $1919 01 and for water hen 
$241 57 

WEYHERT ALPHONSE R 4 MARY R 
WEYHERTA certain parcel of land 
containing 7630 square feet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northeasterly side of Woodward 
Avenue and northerly side of 
Edgewood Circle being designated on 
Assessors Plan as Plot 1 Plan 1114D 
Parcel #004106 Tax ol 1989 $836 80 

WHELAN ALBERT J 4 WHELAN 
BRIAN C A certain parcel of land 
containing 11205 square leet with 
buildings thereon situated upon the 
northerly side of Sea St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot 
15 Plot 12 Plan 1078B Parcel #002454 
Tax of 1989 $1518 00 and for water hen 
$34 70 

WHITE RICHARD K A certain parcel 
of land containing 2122 square feet 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the southerly S' '3 0f ShennenSt being 
designated O' Assessors Plan as Lot 
pt77/pt7P '".ot 14 Plan 1015 Parcel 
#000299 Tax ol 1989 $363 05 

WHITTEMORE MILLS CORPORATION 
(BRADLEY S SWARTZ) A certain 
parcel of land containing (83.612) (764 
sq ft) square leet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the north- 
westerly side ol Linden St and the 
southwesterly side of Private Way 
being designated on Assessor's Plan 
as Plot 8 Plan 5103 Unit #201 Parcel 
#031691 bounded southwesterly by 
land now or late of Mellen Bray Corp . 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Incem International Inc , northeasterly 
by land now or late of Private Way and 
southeasterly by Linden St Tax of 
1989 $523 71 

TC#C194 

WHOOLEY THOMAS P 4 UX MARY 
G A certain parcel of land containing 
9630 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the westerly 
side of Common St being designated 
on Assessor s Plan as Plot 1 7 Plan 401 4 
Parcel #010953 bounded southerly by 
land now or late of 215 Common St 
condo, westerly by land now or late of 
215 Common SI condo, southerly by 
land now or late of 215 Common St 
condo, westerly by land now or late of 
Von Rohr Heights condo, northerly by 
land now or late of Serge A Furtado 4 
ux Edite E and easterly by Common 
St Tax of 1989 $777 34 

TO #93854 
WILCOX FRANCIS S 4 BRENDA C 
GOWDY (EDWARD SEGHAZ2I 
BRENDA C SEGHAZZI 4 EDWARD) 
A certain parcel of land containing 
5000 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the southerly 
side of Nevada Road being designated 
on Assessors Plan as Lot pt 52 Plot 5 
Plan 2009 Parcel #006255 Tax of 1989 
$639 69 

WILLIAMS THOMAS F 4 BERTUCCI 
LOUIS G TREE GRANITE ST RLTY 
(FOX MINING CORP ) A certain parcel 
of land containing 4149 square feel 
with buildings thereon situated upon 
the northwesterly side ol Granite 
Street l>eing designated on Assessors 
Plan as Plot 9 Plan 1 168 Parcel #005084 
txjunded southwesterly by land now 
or late of Granite Place Limited 



Partnership, northwesterly by land 
now or late of Fox Mining Corp, 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Fox Mining Corp and southeastery by 
Granite St Tax of 1989 $103350 

TC #128990 

WITONSKI BOLESLAW 4 UX ANNY B 
A certain parcel of land containing 
8714 square feet with buildings 
thereon situated upon the north- 
easterly side of Mam St being 
designated on Assessor's Plan as Lot A 
Plot 34 Plan 2041 Parcel #007118 Tax 
of 1989 $10 39 

YOUNG ANTHONY C 4 UX RITA R A 
certain parcel of land containing 2700 
square feet with buildings thereon 
situated upon the northerly side of 
Babcock St being designated on 
Assessor s Plan as Lot D2 Plot 41 Plan 
1063 Parcel #001329 bounded 
westerly by land now or late of Frank D 
Mclntyre et Helen F Mclntyre. 
northerly by land now or late of Mary C 
Dawson, easterly by land now or late of 
Elizabeth A Wall and southerly by land 
now or late of Babcock St Tax of 1989 
$541 02 

TC#63517 



1/11/90 



DANA F. CHILDS 
Treaturar and Colleclor 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Notiolk, ss. 

75F1292R2 
To WARREN F. MORTONN 
an absentee, whose last 
known address was 37 
Newton Avenue, Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk having 
property in the County of 
Norfolk; to the Treasurer and 
Receiver General of said 
Commonwealth; to all 
persons claiming an interest 
in the property hereinafter 
described; and to all whom it 
may concern. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court 
praying that Linda Kowilcik 
of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
successor/receiver of the 
following described property 
of said absentee, 37 Newton 
Avenue, Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts in the County of 
Norfolk. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the twenty- 
eighth day of February 1990, 
the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Judge of said 
Court, this twenty-seventh 
day of November 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register 
1/4, 11, 18/89 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3191E1 
Estate of DORIS B. ADAMS 
AKA: DORIS B. ASHFIELD 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JAMES F. 
ADAMS of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 14, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fourth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Raglster of Probat* 
1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

No. 86-D-1349-D2 

JEANNE MARIE WATTS 

Plaintiff 

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION 

VS. 

ROBERT ALAN WATTS 

Defendant 
To the above-named 
Defendant. 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Jeanne Marie 
Watts, seeking divorce. 

You are required to serve 
upon Jeanne Marie Watts, 
Pro Se, plaintiff's attorney, 
whose address is 42 
Harrington Ave., #2R, 
Quincy, MA 02169 your 
answer on or before January 
31. 1990. If you fail to do so 
the Court will proceed to the 
hearing and adjucation of 
this action. You are also 
arequired to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at 
Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esq., First Judge of said 
Court at Dedham. 

December 12, 1989 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 
12/28/89 1/4.11/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3088E1 

Estate of BRENDAN J. 

DONNELLY late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that PATRICIA 
A, DONNELLY of HYANNIS 
in the County of BARN- 
STABLE be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
Should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on January 31, 
1990, 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of sail 
Court at Dedham, the 
nineteenth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty nine. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/11/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3146A1 
Estate of EVERETT J. GILLIS 
late of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that THERESA M. GILLIS of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
administratrix of said estate 
without surety on the bond. 
If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 7 
1990 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-seventh day of 
December, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty nine. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/11/90 



( 



RS9 



Pa(c M Quincy Sun Thuraday. January 11, 1990 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

DEPARTMENT 

Noiiolk Division 

Docket No. 85P3200G1 
NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of HOWARD E. 
LORD late of Quincy, in said 
County, a mentally ill person. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of Grace Herlihy 
and Mary-Lou Brennan as 
resident agent as Temporary 
Guardian have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If yu desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the thirty first day of 
January, 1990, the return 
day of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion r<iay order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such item together with 
the grounds for each such 
objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty eighth day 
of December, 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register 
1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P0087E1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of CLARENCE 
CAMERON late of Quincy, in 
said County, deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of George Ward 
as Executor (the fiduciary) of 
said estate of the will of said 
deceased have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s). you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the seventh day of 
February, 1990, the return 
day of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s) If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account (s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such item together with 
the grounds for each such 
objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M Ford, 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court, this fourth day of 
January, 1990 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register 
1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 80F1983C1 
NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 
To all persons interested in 
the estate of JAMES J. 
CRONIN late of Quincy. in 
said County, deceased a 
person under conservator- 
ship. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first, second 
and final account(s) of 
James J. Cronin, Jr. as 
Conservator (the fiduciary) 
of the property of said James 
J. Cronin have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the thirty-first day of 
January, 1990, the return day 
of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such item together with 
the grounds for each such 
objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty-seventh 
day of Decemt>er, 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
RtgMcr 
1/11/90 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 85P3200G1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of HOWARD E. 
LORD of QUINCY, in said 
County, a mentally ill person. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the Amended 
First account(s) of Grace 
Herlihy and Mary-Lou 
Brennan as resident agent as 
permanent guardian of 
Howard E. Lord have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to ^-eserve 
the right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you c 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the thirty-first day of 
January 1990, the return day 
of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such item together with 
the grounds for each such 
objection thereto, a copy to 
t>e served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P 
Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty-eighth day 
of Decemt>er, 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register 

1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No 89P2425GM 
NOTICE OF GUARDIANSHIP 

OF MINOR 
To KATHERINE ROSE 
HADFIELD of QUINCY and 
to all persons interested in 
the estates of KATHERINE 
ROSE HADFIELD in said 
County, minor. A petition has 
been presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that HOLLY BROWN 

HANDFIELD of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed Guardian of minor 
with custody without surety 
on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on or before the 
31st day of January, 1990. 

Witness. Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, this 
twentieth day of December in 
the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Reglttar ol Probata 
1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3226E1 

Estate of MARY C. PETERSON 

late of QUINCY In the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that FRANCIS T. 
BOUZOUN of ESTENFELD, 
WEST GERMANY be ap- 
pointed executor named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 1 0:00 in 
the forenoon on February 14, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fourth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3125A1 
Estate of JOHN J. TROPEA 
late of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that KATHRYN E TROPEA 
of QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
administratrix of said estate 
without surety on the bond. 
If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on January 31, 
1990. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
nineteenth day of December, 
in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty nine. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
1/11/90 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3186E1 

Estate of PHILIP F. 

TERNULLO late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DONNA 
TERNULO MacLEOD of 
DUXBURY in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 7, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness. Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the 
twenty-eighth day of 
December, one thousand 
nine hundred and eighty 
nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register or Probate 

1/11/90 



Martin Luther King 

Birthday Celebration 

At First Parish 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to 
the City of Quincy: 

School Dept.: 

Fall Athletics Supplies January 24, 1990 @ 10:00 AM 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing 
Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any 
allowable discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and 
date stated above, at which time and date they will t>e publicly 
opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed 
envelope is to be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED,' with 
time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any 
part of a bid or the one deemed t>e8t for the City 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 
Robert F. Denvir, Jr.. Purchasing Agent 
1/11/90 



Quincy's third annual 
celebration of the birthday of 
the late Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr. will take place 
Sunday, Jan. 14, at 3:30 p.m. 
at United First Parish 
Church. 

Caroline Chang, Esq., 
Regional Manager of the 
United States Department of 
Health & Human Services, 
Office of Civil Rights, will be 
speaker for the day. 

Music will be by the Voices 
of Women Victorious from 
St. Paul's African Methodist 
Episcopal Church of 
Cambridge. 

Awards will be presented to 
the winners of the Quincy 
Public Schools Fair Housing 
Poster and Essay Contest. 
There will be a poster display 
and a reading of essays. 

Poster contest winners 
include Ashley Rowerdink, 
grade 2, C.A. Bernazzani 
School; Allison Jones and 
James Foster, both of grade 2 
Mcrrymount School, in the 
K-2 grade group. 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3221E1 

Estate of ANNE V, SELLERS 

late of QUINCY In the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DENNIS M. 
SELLERS of CONCORD in 
the State of CALIFORNIA be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 m 
the forenoon on February 14, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fourth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
1/11/90 



Jennifer Morton and 
Michael Costales, both of 
grade 4 at Squantum School, 
and Scott Stuart of grade 4/ 5 
at Merrymount School, grade 
3-5. 

Robert McCale and Robert 
Mantia, both of grade 6 at 
Central Middle School, and 
Grace Snedden of grade 8 at 
Central Middle School, grade 
6-8. 

Terry McCann, Dean 
Morris and Susan McCole, all 
of grade 10 at Quincy High 
School, grade 9-10. William 
Chu and Joanne Moriarty, 
both of grade 12 at North 
Quincy High School, and 
Renee Barsanti, of grade 1 1 , 
Quincy High School, grade 
11-12. 

$50.00 savings bonds 
presented to each winner were 
donated by Baybank Norfolk 
County Trust, Colonial 
Federal Savings Bank, 
Granite Bank, Hibernia 
Savings Bank, Quincy 
Savings Bank, The Co- 
operative Bank, Shawmut 
Bank, South Shore Bank and 
State Street Bank. 

The Birthday program is 
sponsored by the City of 
Quincy, Quincy Community 
Action Programs, Quincy 
Public Schools, Quincy Fair 
Housing Committee, South 
Shore Coalition for Human 
Rights, United First Parish 
Church and the Quincy 
Human Relations Council. 



PERSONALS 



Most holy apostle St Jude, faithilul 
servant and friend of Jesus the 
church honors and invokes you 
universally, as the patron of 
hopeless cases of things most 
despaired of Pray (or me I am so 
helpless and alone Make use I 
implore you. to bring visible and 
speedy help where help is almost 
despaired of Come to my assistance 
in this great need that I may receive 
the consolation and help of heaven 
in all my necessities, tribulations and 
suffering particularly - (here make 
your request) and that I may praise 
God with you and all the elect forever 
I promise O blessed St Jude to t>e 
ever mindful of the grat favor to 
always honor you as my special and 
powerful patron and to gratefully 
encourage devotion to you Amen' 
1/11 
BR 1/11 

THANK YOU 

St. Jude & Sacred Heart 

of Jesus 

for all favors 

F.M. 

1/11 

THANK YOU 

ST JUDE 

For many favors granted 

Publication pronnisecl 

RC.V. 
Ill 





Quincy 
Pound 
Adoptables ^ 

Husky male, red/ white, 2 years, nice looking dog. 

Sheltie-type male, 1 year, tan with black tip on 
nose and ear, long wavy coat. 

Shepherd-cross, female. 5 months, black tan. very 
friendly. 

Shepherd-cross, female, 5 months, black, tan. 

Lhasa Apso male. 2 years, tan white. 

Labrador-mix male, 6 months, brindlc with white 
on face, chest and paws, rabies shot, very friendly, 
would make good family pet. 

Airdale/ Terrier mix female, .3 months, all black. 

Kitten, 2 months, female, black /orange. 

Kitten, black /white. 4 months. 

Contact Offices Phyllis Berlucchi and Bruce DiBella, 

773-«297, daily houn, 8:30 ain-4:3e pm 

Except Sundays 



Wdt^^jj^.i^^. 



Thursday, January II, 1990 Quincy Sun Pagt 27 




EVERYBODTS MARKETPUCE 



HELP WANTED 



TYPESETTERS 

Part-Time 

Experience preferred 
but will train good typist 



-^^ 






1372 Hancocic St., Quincy Square 
471-3100 



SERVICES 




INSIDEOUT 



Deleading & 
Painting Co. 

• MA Certificate 0001 61 

• Reasonable Prices 

• Free Estimates 

Call 471-2843 
Leave Message 



SERVICES 



WALLPAPERING 

• FREE ESTIMATES 

• REASONABLE RATES 

• SMALL JOBS WELCOME 
CALL RICHARD VESPAZIANI 

479-6160, Att«r 5 PM 

1/25 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALE 

1980 TOYOTA COROLLA 

New brakes, battery, shocks, 
starter, tires 106K miles, very 
reliable Must sell, moving $700 
or BO 749-7480 Leave message 



FOR SALE 

1 pair men's figureskatessize 
10- $20, 1 pair boys hockey 
skates size 8, $20. Black stove 
$10 472-4692 

1/11 



INSTRUCTION 



JOY of PIANO 
JOY of ORGAN 

LMBont 
328- OSM 



2/15 



WANTED 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Share quiet 3 bdrm house $290/ 
mo plus 1/3 utils. Near hwy 93. 
on bus route to Red Line W/D 
Must like pets Days 426-7330 
ext 233. Nights 773-5959. 

1/18 



SEARCHING FOR 

RELIABLE CHILD CARE 

in my WoMaslon horn*. 

Mother of three ages & 5 and 3 
Mon . Wed, Fri 9-430. Tues & 
Thurs 5-9 p m References and 
own transportation required 
Fore more info, call 773-3547 

2/1 

GOVERNMENT StiZEO 

Vehicles from $100 Fords 
Mercedes Corvettes Chevys 
Surplus Buyers Guide (1) 805- 
687-6000 Ext. S-3019 

10/12 



PERSONALS 



THANK YOU 
ST. JUDE 

For hearing and answering 

my prayers 

VMDB 

1/11 



REAL ESTATE 



HOUSE FOR SALE 

Quincy 

4 rooms, sun room, waterview, all 
appliances, w/w carpeting 
Fenced in yard. Available 
1/31/90 $115,000 by owner 479- 
7694 

1/11 



FOR RENT 
STORE AND OFFICE 

600 sq ft. plus basement, 
parking 65 Billings Rd by 
Hancock St, Quincy. Ask next 
store to show $440 Owner no 
fee 734-8172 

1/25 



ATTENTION 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U-repair). Delinquent 
tax property. Repossessions 
Call 1-602-838-8885 Ext GH 

2379 

1/18 

ATTENTION: 

EARN MONEY READING BOOKSI 

$32,000/year income 
potential. Details' (1) 602- 
838-8885 Ext. Bk2379. 

1/11 

FOR RENT 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite- Capacity 300 
Venetian Room-capacity 140. 
Call 472-,snTO tF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers, 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St. 

Quinfy 

472-2223 

TF 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 



HALL FOR R^NT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No. 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



WANTED 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Old woodworking tools, hand 

planes, surplus hand tools; all 

trades. Precision machinist 

tools, shoplots 

558-3889 also 527-191* 

4/5 

WANTED TO BUY 

Furniture - Estates 
Highest prices for entire 
contents -attic to cellar Also 
separate items-boks, clocks, 
wicker, prints, glass, etc Call 

Alden 472-4917 

2/22 



Old and riew 
Furniture Bought 

Also rugs, clocks, paintings, 

glassware and bric-a-brac 

749-6475 



OLD OIL PAINTINGS 
WANTED 

Wanted to buy old oil 
paintings; Marine, landscape. 
Impressionist or Traditional 
Also Watercolors, old books, 
prints frames and postcards 
558-3839 Also 527-1916 

2/12 



SERVICES 



THE LITTLE MAN 

Construction 

ROOFING, CARPENTRY, GUTTERS 

DECKS. PORCHES, PAINTING 

STRUCTURAL WORK, REPAIRS 

No Job Too Big or Small 

Call Chris 471-8218 




2/1 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

LAMP IKPAIR 
& REWIRING 




Protect Your Investment 

Coletti Painting 

Gutters Cleaned 

Interior & Exterior 



786-1864 Mark Coletti 773-3720 

North Quincy Free Estimates '^" 




TAX RETURNS 

Richard McDonough 
Professional Service in your 
home Enrolled to practice 
before the IRS Registered 
Investment Advisor 472- 
2694, 545-7919 

4/12 



J.N. ELECTRICAL CO. 

Fully Licensed and Insured 

No Job Too Small 

Lie (€28696 Free Estimates 

11 Hallam St., Boston, MA 02125 

Jack Nee (617)288-6467 

2/1 

EDDIE'S WELDING & 
METAL FABRICATION 

Offers portable service in all 
types of repairs and light iron 
fabrication. Free Estimates 
(617)471-2059 

3/1 

RENEY ELECTRICAL 

Residential/Commercial 

Licensed/lnsurec 

No job too smaM/24 IHrs 

References 

Call Stephen Reney 

773-9357 Llc.«E30643 

1/11 



HOUSE 
CLEANING 

For that really clean feeling 
call Pat 479-0124 $12.00 hr. 



SPOTLESS CLEANING 
SERVICE 

Have your home, office, etc. 
cleaned to perfection. Excellent 
references, reliable and efficient. 
Phone 471-7788 

2/1 

CARPENTRY 

Roofing, Painting. Porch Work. 

Vinyl Siding. Windows. Doors, 

Gutters. Etc. 

No Job Too Small 

Free Estimates 

T. SwMnay 825-1210 

3/29 

LOSE WEIGHT! 

Safely and effectively as Oprah 

at one fifth the cost with "Food 

For Life Weight Management 

System" 

Call 472-9662 or 
696-1089 

2/17 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
' QUINCY TF 

LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

HOME REPAIR 

MADE AFFORDABLE 

Interior-Exterior Work 

No Job Too Small 

Call Dan Brown 472-9662 

1/25 

PAINTING 

Interior • Exterior 

Wallpapering • Wood Staining 

Licensed • Insured 

We use 1st Quality Products 

You get Top Quality Results 

For Estimates Call 

963-1613 1/25 

WALLCOVERING 

Residential/Commercial 

Free Estimates 

Call John Stankus 

479-1104 or 269-0352 

1/18 



NEED BABYSITTER? 

Mother of 5 grown children will 
babysit infants to 5 year olds in 
my home. Houghs Neck area 
471-S310 

1/2 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing {md cleaning 

• Sharpening 

((ctasors, knIvM. etc ) 

• Greek XL Vacuums 

• Electroluxw/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
47»-S066 



Your South Shoie 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St . So Quincy 
4^2-1710 

TF 




SULLIVAN 

LANDSCAPE 

AND 

TREE SERVICE 

Free Estimatet 

472-3595 



3/1 



VJEDOIT4I.4 
WELDING CO. 

quincy'^ 479-0991 

1/4/90 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 




CV\an/ip/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



INDEX 



QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 

QUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D 4.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 3 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable T.V, tor only $l per day. 

D $4.20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of the same aa 
IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 4 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable TV. for only $1 per day 



a Services 

D For Sale 

D Autos 

D Boats 

D. For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 
a Pels, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

O Antiques 

n Coina A Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

D Day Care 

□ Personal 

□ Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abb^viated if neccesary. 



QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
TV. COMBO 
8 WEEKS 



D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions fo same ad, 
10« each additional word Channel 26-Sun Cable for 5 days at 
$1.00 per day 



QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $3.85 per insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 
same ad, IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad, you can also run for 7 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable TV. for only $1 per day 



SUN CABLE 
T.V. ONLY 



D Run your ad on Channel 26-Sun Cable TV alone for 3 days at 
$2 per day 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun and 



-for the following ad to run 



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-days on Channel 26. 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION 
DEADLINE TUESDAY, 10 00 AM PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AO 



- ^.\ 



^i^ 



Page 2S Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, 1990 



Cholesterol Screenings 



Lectromed will conduct a 
cholesterol screening 
Tuesday, Jan. 16 and 
Wednesday, Jan. 17 from 10 
a.m. to S p.m. at the Super 



Stop A Shop, 495 Southern 
Aitery, Quincy. 

There will be a $6 charge for 
the screening. Results will be 
available while waiting. 



Sheets Names 4 
To Law Department 



MIGNOSA'S 
FRUIT BASKET 



Bananas 



3 Lbs for 



990 



Mix n' Match 



Red Delicious 
Golden 
Granny Smith 
Macintosh 
Cortland 




pound 



Andy Boy 
Rabe 

Broccoli 



990 



Lb 



Common 
Onions 



290 



Lb 



Boar's Head - Low Salt 

Ham Lb. 5.49 Bologna u>. 2.49 
Turkey ib. 5.49 



SAVE 50< Pound 



Boar^sHead RoOSt Boefib. 5.99 



148 Granite Street Quincy 
471-9715 



(Cont'd from Pagv I) 

it with any Braintree officials. 

Specifically, the city is 
questioning whether the Site 
Safety Council is acting 
properly in regard to possible 
hazardous waste areas. "1 
think Quincy, Braintree and 
Weymouth will be looking 
very closely at the site 
selection process," McGrath 
said. 

The deadline to file a suit 
against Clean Harbors is in 
March or April, he noted. 



Sheets said he is confident 
that the city can defeat the 
MWRA in court. 

"1 think we're aggressively 
pursuing an objective that's 
obtainable. Our strategy is to 
prevent the MWRA from 
obtaining a permanent sludge 
operation. 

"1 think we have a chance of 
stopping the treatment plant. 
When you deal with the 
judicial process, there's 
always a chance of winning. 
(The lawsuits) are worth 




Anthony L. Agnitti 



AGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

Let us give you a 

connpetitive quote on your 

AUTO, homeowner, business. 

life and health 



• Free Registry Service 
Free Notary Service • Time Payments 
• Fully Computerized 
• Quotes By Phone 



21 Franklin St. 
Quincy, 02169 



770-0123 




WEYMOUTH 

SAVINGS BANK 

HAS THE 

KEYS 
TO YOUR 
^ NEW 
( CAR 



1 



NEW Auto Loan 



txt, 



NOW 




% 



ANNUAL PERCENTAGE" RATE 



TERMS UP TO 36 MONTHS 
WITH 20% DOWN PAYMENT 

A $3,000 Loan for 3 years requires monthly; payments of $96.79 
Total finance charge will be $484.44 

CALL OUR LOAN DEPARTMENT TODAY! 

337-2700 

Meinl>er FDIC/DIFM 

47 Washington Street, Weymouth Landing 
383 Bridge Street, North Weymouth 
295 Washington Street, Weymouth 
372 Quincy Avenue, East Braintree 



WEy-bANJi 

/<^^ WCYMOUTH 




WCyM<HJT 

savIngs 
Bank 



pursuing." 

The mayor also said he 
thinks Clean Harbors is more 
vulnerable than the MWRA, 
essentially because the 
hazardous waste firm does 
not have any "built-in 
protection" like the state 
agency. 

"Clean Harbors is a totally 
different creature than the 

MWRA " 

Sheets noted that Mac Ritchie's 



appointment gives the law 
department some continuity. He 
will handle a number of cases he 
was involved in under former 
Mayor FraiK-is X. McCauley, 
including the Woodward School 
lawsuit. 

"With Jay MacRitchie, I think 
we get continuity, not just on 
cases he's been involved in but 
other cases where well be doing 
additional work." 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 



Police Redefining 
Media Policy 



(Con I 'd from Panv 2) 

ext. 

• Facts and circumstances 
of an arrest. 

• Identity of investigating 
and arresting officers. 

• Lenthy of investigation 
leading to the arrest. 

• Description of physical 
evidence seized. 

• Identity (name, age, sex, 
address and occupation) of 
the accused if 17 years old or 
older. 

• Age and sex of accused 
only if under 17. 

• Nature of any charges 
placed against an accused 
person. 

• Schedule or results of 
any stages in the judicial 
process. 

Information that may not 
be released includes: 

• Existence or content of 
any prior criminal record of 
the accused. 

• Comments about 
character or reputation of the 
accused. 

• Existence of a confes- 
sion, admission of guilt or 
other statement made by the 
accused. 

• Results of examinations 
or tests conducted or refused 
(including blood alcohol 
content tests). 

• Identity, testimony or 
credibility of any wunesses or 



prospective witnesses. 

• Possibility of a guilty 
plea. 

• Opinions as to the 
quality of evidence for a case. 

• Opinions as to the guilt 
or innnocence of a suspect, 
name, address and present 
location of any victims of sex 
offenses. 

• Name and address of 
juveniles arrested. 

• Police pictures of 
persons arrested or pictures 
that have been made a part of 
a criminal record, unless 
published to aid in the capture 
of a wanted suspect or missing 
person. 

• Names and address of 
any person sought for a crime 
but not yet formally charged, 
unless assistance is needed 
from news media to locate the 
person. 

• Identity of persons 
considered suspects. 

• In case of sudden or 
accidental death or serious 
injury, the identity of the 
victim will be withheld until 
next of kin are notified. 

• Contents of any suicide 
note or attempted suicide. 

In homicide cases including 
suicides, it is up to the medical 
examiner to reveal informa- 
tion regarding the incident 
including notes, Finn noted. 



Pierce To Address City 
Republicans Jan. 16 



The Quincy Republican 
City Committee will meet 
Tuesday, Jan. 16 at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Quincy. 

Steven Pierce, candidate 
for governor, will be the guest 
speaker. This is a very 
important meeting as the 



delegates for the Mass. 
Republican Convention, to be 
held in March, will be 
confirmed. 

Elections for officers and 
committee members are also 
scheduled for this meeting. 

For further information 
call 47 1 - 1 774 between 7 and 9 



p.m. 



4 




SHIRT SPECIAL 

Bring in as many shirts as 
you wish and pay only 990 
each for laundering. Shirts 
returned on a hanger with 
or without starch. 

Offer good on incoming 
orders only with this ad. 
Not good in combination 
with other offers. 
Expires January 27, 1990. 




Quincy, Lakin Sq , 581 Adams Si - Wollaston, 624 Hancock St 
So. Quincy, 320 Ouncy Ave. - East Milton, 338 Granite Ave. 



6?T iT, 



Quincy Soldier Says Invasion Was 1 

Panama Delayed Their CL 



'%\ 



i(V:. 






r r '' "^ 



m. m.KJ V/AJ 



A.; .rr; r'l PYm''' 



Lmt^d 



By JANE ARENA 

Christmas came a little 
late this year for Stephen 
and Nancy (Johnston) 
Mallory, a former Quincy 
couple now living in 
Fayetteville, North 
Carolina. 

But late or not, it was 
certainly welcome. 

Mallory, 25, a member 
of the 82nd Airborne 
Division attached to Fort 
Bragg, N.C., returned 
Friday after combat in the 
US invasion of Panama. 
He had been there since 
Dec. 20, among the first to 
be sent in. 

On Monday of this 
week, Mallory, his wife, 
and their two young sons, 
Kevin and Patrick, were 
celebrating Christmas in 
their North Carolina 
home. He took time out to 



speak with The Quincy 
Sun. 

Mallory is the son of 
Raymond and Carrie 
Mallory of Wollaston and 
a 1983 graduate of North 
Quincy High School. He 
will be coming home to 
Quincy for two weeks 
furlough with his family. 
He said Monday that he 
could be back in Quincy by 
the end of this week, and 
he's looking forward to it. 

So are his family and 
friends, who have been 
planning a homecoming 
for him. 

Now that he's back, 
Mallory speaks freely of 
the day he was sent to 
Panama. 

"We were locked in (at 
Fort Bragg) on that 
Monday (Dec. 18), and 
our families were totally 



cut off," he says of the days 
just prior to the mission. 

"Tuesday night we 
boarded planes at Pope 
Airforce Base and at 4 a.m. 
on Wednesday, the 20th, 
we jumped to Tocumen- 
Torrijos Airfield (east of 
Panama City)." 

His family, Mallory 
says, did not know he had 
been sent to Panama until 
later that Wednesday. 

"I just didn't come home 
from work," he says. 
"Nobody knew anything 
until we actually jumped 
in. We had no connections 
to the outside world when 
we were locked in. The 
whole thing was kept 
completely secret. . .which 
is a good thing. 

"There was some firing 
going on when we dropped 
(by parachute)," he 



continues. "We assembled 
at first daylight, that's 
when we were in most of 
our firefight." 

The target objective for 
Stephen's unit was "El 
Tigre," a barracks where 
190 of General Manuel 
Noriega's special forces 
were living, he explains. 

"That was our main 
objective. . . we were under 
fire the whole time we were 
away from the bird," he 
said. 

In his battalion, he said, 
a total of 17 men were 
wounded in action and two 
men were killed. 

There is no hesitation 
when you ask him how he 
felt in Panama: "I was 
scared," he says, "You bet I 
was scared." 

But neither does he 

(C.iml'il on I'afie II) 




STEPHEN MALLORY, 82nd Airborne Division, who 
recently returned from active duty in Panama, is pictured 
here one year ago with his family: ciocliwise, from left, 
Nancy (Johnston) Mallory, Kevin Mallory (now J'/j), and 
Patrick Mallory, (now Z'/j). 



vol.. 22 No. 17 




3 To 13.7% 

Budget Cuts Ride 
On Sewer User Fee 



HEAVY SMOKE POIIRS from a burning building on Arthur St. early Tuesday during a five- 
alarm fire. The Building was fully involved in flame when firefighters arrived. Apartment houses 
nearby were evacuated during the height of the blaze. 

Story, Other Photo Page 3 (Quincy S„n ,,h„l„ by Ion, (iorman) 

Teen Age Dances 
May Be Banned 



The Quincy License Board 
is considering permanently 
cancelling Friday night 
teenage dance parties at the 
Quincy Bay Inn due to two 
incidents there which 
involved police and one of 
which involved a youth with a 



gun. 

The board did cancel a 
dance scheduled there for this 
Friday. 

The board has requested 
that the management of the 
Quincy Bay Inn appear at its 
next regular meeting. 



Tuesday, Jan. 23 at 10 a.m., to 
"show just cause why the 
teenage dances should not be 
permanently cancelled," said 
Board Chairman John Gillis. 
Quincy Liquor Inspector, 
Sgt. Richard Laracy, 

« onl'il on Pn/H' V) 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The city's clouded fiscal 
future should become a little 
clearer this week since the 
City Council was preparing to 
debate a sewer user fee 
proposed by Mayor James A. 
Sheets. 

The proposal was to be 
discussed at a City Council 
Ordinance meeting Wednesday 
at 7:15 p.m. in the Council 
Chambers of City Hall. 

Sheets has proposed the fee 
because the city faces an 
estimated $15 million deficit 
in fiscal 1991 which begins 
July 1. If adopted, the fee 
would raise approximately 
$9.5 million next year to help 
offset that deficit. 

On Tuesday, Sheets 
received figures from the 
Auditor's Office showing the 
scenarios connected with the 
fee. If adopted. Sheets will 
order all department heads to 
cut their budgets by three 
percent across-the-board. 

However, if the fee fails, the 
mayor said there will be 13.7 
percent across-the-board cuts 



in all city departments. 

For example, with the fee, 
the school system's $38 
million budget would be 
reduced by $862,000. The $1 1 
million police budget would 
be cut by $244,000, Sheets 
said. 

But if the fee is not 
approved, the school budget 
will be slashed by $5.2 million 
and the police budget by $1.5 
million, the mayor said. 

There were no figures 
available for the fire 
department since it is unclear 
whether a recently approved 
five percent raise has been 
tabulated. The hike will add 
$300,000 to next year's 
budget. 

As proposed, all sewer 
users including major 
industrial, tax exempt as well 
as small commercial and 
residential users would pay a 
fee based on each user's 
contribution to wastewater 
flows in Quincy. 

If adopted, a family of four 
would pay $281.19 between 
this July I and June 30, 1991. 



A family of five would pay 
$307.15, family of nine 
$497.49 while a senior citizen 
living alone would pay $64.88. 

The bill for a 64-unit 
apartment building would be 
$5,204 while the cost for a 
small business such as a 
convenience store would be 
$270.39. 

Quincy is the only 
community in the MWRA 
servicing district without a 
sewer user fee. There are 43 
communities in the district 
including neighboring 
Braintree, Milton and 
Weymouth. 

According to Public Works 
Commissioner David Colton, 
two thirds of the money 
generated by the fee would go 
to the MWRA to cover 
assessments. This year, the 
assessment increased by $2 
million, from $4.8 million to 
$6.8 million. 

Included in the assessment 
is Quincy's share of the cost to 
build the new sewage 
treatment plant oh Deer 

(Cont'd an Page 24) 



Bringing Chips Home To Friends 



Quincy Attorney Helps Tear Down Berlin Wall 



Quincy Atty. George G. 
Burke is in East Germany 
this week helping to tear 
down the Berhn Wall. 

Burke made sure he had 
a hammer and chisel 
packed with his socks, 
shorts and shirts when he 
left Quincy. 

He has about 100 chips 
of the wall— maybe eight 
to ten pounds of it — to 
bring home to Quincy he 
reported in a telephone call 
to The Quincy Sun 
Monday from Checkpoint 



Charlie in East Germany. 
He said he will give them 
to friends and his staff at 
his Hancock St. North 
Quincy law office. One, he 
said is for The Sun. 

"We saw everything that 
was happening on the 
Berlin Wall and we wanted 
to get over here and cut 
down a piece for freedom," 
Burke said. 

"And it's really 
exciting," he added, "Oh, 
is it ever exciting." 

The former Norfolk 



County District Attorney 
and City Councillor, and 
now a prominent Quincy 
lawyer, Burke made the 
trip to Berlin with his wife 
Sandra Jan. 1 1. Also with 
him are his brother, John 
Burke, a professor of 
economics at Cleveland 
State University, and his 
wife, Nancy, a Cleveland 
lawyer. 

The four chipped down 
about 100 pieces of the 
Wall, Burke said, while 
East German guards 



watched them. 

The guards, all armed, 
Burke said, did not 
interfere in any way. 

"In fact, they even 
talked to us," he said. 

According to Burke, the 
Berlin Wall is nearly as 
difficult to take down 
physically as it is 
politically. 

"It's made out of the 
hardest concrete you can 
imagine," he said. 

While in Germany, the 
four also took the 



opportunity to tour all 
around East Germany, 
something which, only 
months ago, would have 
been impossible. 

Burke said he was 
genuinely impressed with 
the conditions of the 
country. 

"East Germany has been 
greatly restored from the 
bombings that took place 
during World War II," he 
said. "West Berlin is 
wonderful. The Keiser 

({'.onl'il on Pa/tv III 




GEORGE BURKE 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18. 1990 

Proteetion Plan Forum 
At Adams Historic Site 

Residents were invited to Wednesday from 7 to 9 p.m. 

attend an open forum on the at the Stone Library, Adams 
draft land protection plan 

proposed for the Adams National Historic Site, 135 

Nation?! Historic Site Adams St., Quincy. 



MIGNOSA'S 
FRUIT BASKET 



Officials Call For Contract 

Evaluation After 12 School 

Buses Found Unsafe 



Bananas 



Lb. 



390 



Mix n' Match 



Red Delicious 



Golden 
Granny Smith 
Macintosh 
Cortland 




By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Responding to a recent 
safety check which found 
nearly half of the city's school 
buses unsafe, several Quincy 
school officials are calling for 
an evaluation of the city's 
contract with the bus 
transportation firm. 

On Tuesday. Mayor James 
Sheets. Supt. Dr. Robert 



Ricci and School Committee 
member Steve Durkin said 
the city should examine its 
$337,000 a year contract with 
Ryder Student Bus Trans- 
portation. 

Last Wednesday, the 
Registry of Motor Vehicles 
ordered 12 out of Ryder's 27 
buses off the road because of 
safety defects that included 



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990Lb 



Large Bunch 

Broccoli 

990 



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Boston's North End 
Bova Bread 

FRESH DAILY 



148 Granite Street Quincy 
471-9715 



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Northeast Fish 
and Lobster 

"Fresh Daily" 

Live Lobsters 
Fresh Fish & Shelifish 
Fried Seafoods To Go 
Call Ahead to Take Out - 

472-1230 

148 Granite St., Quincy 

(Next to Fruit Basket) 
(Formcrty J.G. Quincy Lobster) 



World Premiere on Cable 
Monday, January 22 
8pm Eastem, Encore 11pm 

Channel 40 




emergency brake that didn't 
work and emergency door 
handles that were stuck or too 
difficult for children to open. 

By Thursday, all of the 
buses were repaired and back 
on the road. The registry 
check the remaining buses 
Tuesday but details were 
unavailable at press time. 

Sheets, who is chairman of 
the School Committee, said 
the city should figure out a 
way to supervise the 
maintenance and repair work 
of all buses. He noted that 
Ryder has a mechanic who is 
supposed to make sure the 
buses arc up to standards. 

However, the mayor noted 
this situation is like letting 
"the fox take care of the 
chickens." Instead, Sheets 
said he favors having 
someone other than a Ryder 
employee examine and check 
the buses. 

Asked whether he thinks 
the safety failure is grounds 
for not renewing Ryder's 
contract next year. Sheets 
said "I think it's questionable 
whether it should be 
renewed." He said he would 
ask City Solicitor Stephen 
McGrath for an opinion. 

In a letter to Ricci dated 
Jan. 15. Durkin said "it seems 
that safety violations on the 
part of Ryder have been taken 
altogether too lightly, not 
only by Ryder, but by the 
School Department as well." 

Continuing. Durkin said. 
"While Ryder is responsible 
for maintaining the vehicles, 
the school system is ultimately 
responsible for the safety of 
those school children being 
transported to and from 
school. Parents have the right 
to expect their children will be 
transported safely, and their 
safety must not be compro- 
mised in any way." 

The issue was scheduled to 
be discussed at Wednesday's 
School Committee hearing at 
the Quincy High Methods 



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Center. Ricci said representa- 
tives from Ryder were 
expected to address the 
committee at 8:30 p.m. 

Durkin said the city could 
take several courses of action 
against Ryder, including: 

• Witholding payment 
under the contract for lack of 
performance on the part of 
Ryder. 

• Including a penalty 
clause calling for payment to 
the school for violations if the 
existing contract does not 
already have such a condition. 

• Seriously considering 
non-renewal of Ryder's 
contract. 

Beyond contractual issues. 
Durkin said the school system 
should conduct spot checks of 
the vehicles on a regular basis 
to ensure that basic safety 
requirements are met. 

"The casual attitude 
displayed by Ryder in 
maintaining its buses cannot 
be tolerated, and this issue 
should be resolved im- 
mediately." Durkin told 
Ricci. 

In response, the superin- 
tendent said Ryder has made 
some improvements in repairs 
but "there's a lot to be desired. 
We've tried to patch things 
up." 

Ricci also said that the 
problems discovered by the 
Registry arc not "major safety 
issues." He also said that most 
of the buses are more than 
three years old. 

As far as renewing Ryder's 
contract. Ricci said "We 
should look at it." 

Ricci noted that thecity has 
difficulty supervising the 
safety of the buses because 
Ryder's maintenance facility 
is in Brockton. 

"The problem is the 
maintenance facility is not 
here in Quincy. It's in 
Brockton. Ryder has a 
mechanic at the Quincy 
bus yard (located behind the 
former Miles Standish 
School) but he can't do major 
repairs." 

The superintendent also 
noted that Ryder is a large 
school bus transportation 
company and services many 
area communities. "I think 
they are just too extended to 
do the proper job." 

According to Ricci. 
approximately 1,500 to 1.800 
students take the bus to 
school daily. Most of these 
children are in elementary 
school. One middle school 
uses bus transportation. 



Jewelry 
Workshop 

"The South Shore's Source 
For Jewelry Repair" 

Diamond Settingr, Remounts 

Repairs 

Bead Stringing 

Makers of Unique Jewelry 

All Work Done on Premises 

53 Franklin St. Quincy, MA 

328-1961 



Thunday, January 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Page J 



$250,0004350,000 Damage 



West Quincy Blaze 
Under Investigation 



One firefighter was injured 
when he slipped on ice during 
a five-alarm blaze on Arthur 
St. in West Quincy early 
Tuesday morning that caused 
damage estimated at between 
$250,000 and $350,000. 

The three story wooden 
frame building opposite 75 
Arthur St., the former site of 
the Finnish Temperance Hall 
and now a storage facility 
used by the Globe Vending 
Machine Co. and as storage 
and rehearsal space for area 
bands, was totally destroyed. 

Damage to the building was 
estimated at between 
$250,000 and $350,000, 
according to Fire Captain 
George McGunagle. 

McGunagle said the origin 
of the fire is under 
investigation by the Quincy 
Fire Prevention Bureau and 



the State hire Marshall's 
office. 

McGunagle said the 
contents of the building 
(vending machines and 
musical equipment) were 
totally destroyed as well, but 
had no dollar amount of the 
loss on Tuesday afternoon. 

The initial alarm was 
sounded at 1:59a.m. Tuesday, 
McGunagle said. When 
firefighters arrived on the 
scene, almost all of the 
building was involved in 
flames. 

Subsequent alarms fol- 
lowed within minutes and the 
Quincy Fire Department 
received aid from Boston, 
Braintree, Weymouth, Milton 
and from Needham and 
Dedham on the fifth alarm. 

Deputy Fire Chief Tom 
Gorman was in charge of the 



blaze until Fire Chief Paul 
O'Connell arrived at the 
second alarm, McGunagle 
said. 

Apartment houses on 
Nelson and Arthur Sts. were 
evacuated at the height of the 
blaze. 

Firefighter James Wong 
was injured when he slipped 
on the ice at the scene and was 
sent to Quincy Hospital 
complaining of back pain. 
McGunagle said that Wong 
was expected to be released 
from the hospital on Tuesday. 

As of Tuesday afternoon at 
approximately 1:20, the all- 
out had not been sounded on 
the blaze, McGunagle said. 
Two companies. Engine 5 and 
Ladder 3, remained at the 
scene to control smoldering 
material. A crane was also at 
the scene to remove debris, he 
said. 




Speeding, Stop Signs 
On Traffic Committee Agenda 



The Quincy Traffic 
Commission was set to meet 
Wednesday at 10 a.m. in the 
Planning Department 
Conference Room, City Hall 
annex. 



Among the 
Commission 



items the 
was to discuss 
were: 

• Speeding problem at the 
intersection of Grove St. and 
Bryant Ave. Make recom- 
mendations to improve 
safety. 

• Remove two-way stop 
sign at the intersection of 
Verchild and Bennington Sts. 
and replace with a four-way 
stop sign at same intersection. 

• Montclair School, area 
surrounding it, request made 
to improve safety there by: 

• Installing four-way stop 
sign at intersection of 
Belmont St. and Holbrook 
Rd. 

• Establish a School Zone 
on Holbrook Rd. 

• Make recommendations 
with respect to intersections 
of Holbrook, Farrington, 
Fayette and Safford Sts. 

• Conduct study of 
neighborhoods adjacent to 
Quincy Hospital ascertaining 
whether ordinances in the 
area should be changed due to 
the reopening of the hospital's 
parking lot. 

• Establish loading zone 
on Cottage Ave. next to 



Montillio's Bakery. 

• Install stop signs facing 
west and east at the 
intersection of Verchild and 
Plymouth Sts. in the interest 
of public safety. Presently, 
signs are facing north and 
south. 

• Install no parking signs 
for the first 100 feet on the 
even side of Standish Ave. 
Also study intersection of 
Hancock St. and Standish 
Ave. and make recommenda- 
tions to improve safety. 

These handicapped parking 
requests were on the agenda: 

• Establish handicapped 
parking space on Newbury 
Ave. near Kendall St. in front 
of the D.A.V. Post. 

• Install handicapped 
parking sign at 42 Presidents 
Ave. 

• Install handicapped 
parking space in front of 72 
Brook Rd. 



• Install 
parking sign 
Lawn Ave. 



handicapped 
in front of 39 



QUINCY FIREFIGHTERS set up a ladder pipe as a five-alarm fire rages throush the former 
meeting house on Arthur St. in West Quincy early Tuesday. Boston, Braintree, Milton, 
Weymouth, Needham and Dedham Fire Department assisted at the scene. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Flap Gate, Neighborhood Club 
Trees On ConCom Agenda 

quantity of mature trees, on 
property located at 27 
Glendale Rd. 

• At 8:15 p.m., notice of 
intent filed by MWRA for the 
construction of a tunnel 
shaft and deeprock inter- 
island tunnel to convey waste 
water from Nut Island to the 
proposed secondary treat- 
ment facility on Deer Island, 
Quincy Bay. 



The Quincy Conservation 
Commission was scheduled to 
meet Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Second Floor 
Conference Room, City Hall 
annex. 
Agenda items included: 
• At 7:30 p.m., a notice of 
intent filed by the Quincy 
Public Works Department for 
the removal of an existing flap 
gate and internal modifica- 



tion of the existing 
underground concrete 
chamber to install a "duck- 
bill" type tidegate, near 
intersection of Babcock St. 
and 33 Manet Ave. 

• At 7:45 p.m., notice of 
intent filed by the Quincy 

Neighborhood Club to 
expand existing parking area 
with associated drainage, and 
the prior removal of a 




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Sunbeams 

By Henry Bos worth 



25« 

rzxx 




Layoffs Dreaded Word 



*>• luircy awit. 






Sheet> Proclaims 
'Human Rights 
Awareness' Month 



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>XT^ iracs ill :ni2a5 x- 
jariciTare ::n:ng:''' n ts 



Seasonal Employment 

Opportunities At 
Adams Historic Site 



Sis«or-c Site. Quinc/ s 

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Readers Forum 

Puzzling Statement? 
On Baltic Republic? 



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wjcies xenianas (jt rT=aoni 
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Thunds). January 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Fabrizio's Council Priorities: 

Curb Overdevelopment 
Go Slow On Fee Hikes 
Improve School System 
• Take Active Rezoning Roll 



Quincy*s 
Yesterdays 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Curbing unwanted and 
overdevelopment, improving 
the city's school system and 
taking an active role in the 
rezoning of West and South 
Quincy are among the top 
priorities of new Ward 4 
Councillor Thomas Fabrizio. 

Fabrizio, 34, of 36 Reardon 
St., West Quincy, also says he 
would like to see a community 
center serving the needs of 
South and West Quincy 
residents by the end of his first 
term in 1991. 

Regarding city finances, the 
freshman councillor is 
undecided on a sewer user fee 
and opposes a rubbish 
hauling fee. Most of all, he 
said he doesn't want Quincy 
to start imposing fees for 
"every service we provide." 

A life-long Ward 4 resident, 
Fabrizio attended Quincy 
High School and Northeast- 
ern University. He is 
employed as a social worker- 
investigator for the state 
Department of Social 
Services. 

He is married to the former 
Kathy Graham and they have 
two daughters: Nicole, age 5, 
and Michelle, 18 months. 

Here is the text of a recent 
interview with The Quincy 
Sun: 

Sun: What issue or concern 
is your top priority as Ward 4 
councillors? 

Fabrizio: My top priority 
as Ward 4 councillor is to 
preserve the character of the 
neighborhoods. There has 
been, historically, a lot of 
development that has 
interferred with the character 
of the neighborhoods and I 
believe we have to set an 
agenda to curb this type of 
unwanted developments. 

Homeowners and working 
men and women need to have 
their investment of a home 
and property protected and I 
feel (curbing overdevelop- 
ment) needs to become a top 
priority to protect their 
investment. 

Another top priority will be 
to be very active in rezoning 
the ward to protect 
neighborhoods from unwant- 
ed and overdevelopment. 
Mayor (James) Sheets has 
indicated that he will start a 
rezoning of the city and when 
it comes to Ward 4 1 intend to 
take an active role in that and 
I hope to get a lot of input 
from the residents. 

I would like to have, by the 
end of February, my own plan 
to present to the Rezoning 
Board and Council President 




THOMAS FABRIZIO 

Ted DeCristofaro with 
regards to the rezoning of 
Ward 4. 

Sun: Do you have a specific 
goal that you would like to 
look back on in two years as 
something you have accomp- 
lished? 

Fabrizio: I would like to see 
a community center to serve 
South and West Quincy. I feel 
it's important for our area; 
other parts of the city have a 
community center. I see a lot 
of good that can come out of 
it. I feel, for too long, we've 
been fragmented here which is 
one of the reasons why I think 
we have historically at times 
had difficulty with issues. 

A community center would 
be a way for us to meet 
together as a group, as a 
community, and to act more 
as a community. I would like 
to see, hopefully before the 
end of my two years, a 
community center built or the 
Lincoln-Hancock School 
refurbished for that purpose. 

Sun: Do you have any ideas 
on how this project could be 
funded? 

Fabrizio: I would like to 
see, and it's already begun, 
(the project funded) through 
privatization. Presently I am 
working with the South West 
Quincy Community Rela- 
tions Committee and have 
been, as then-councillor and 
now Mayor James Sheets had 
for quite some time, with 
them and people in the 
community interested in this. 

I'd like to expand the role of 
local businessmen and 
developers into helping fund 
this project. There has already 
been a large amount of 
funding for this project and 
this needs to be continued and 
I'll work diligently with this 
committee to see that it's 
done. 

Sun: Away from Ward 4, 
what other important issues 
do you plan to take an active 
role in? 



Fabrizio: I think city-wide a 
top priority is education. I 
said while campaigning and I 
believe it's true that the 
reputation of a community 
rests on the reputation and 
quality of its school system. 

Families who invest in 
property and move into a city 
buy more than just a piece of 
land and a home. They want 
to buy a future for their 
children; they want to be 
assured that they're getting 
the best that can be provided 
in education and therefore I 
think that is a top priority. 

I think it affects all of us 
whether we have children or 
not. I certainly know when I 
was campaigning that older 
people, whose children have 
grown up and a lot of them 
moved out of the city 
understood the importance of 
education and what it meant 
to the community, what it 
meant to the future and what 
it means even in regard to the 
value of their own property 
long after their children are 
out of the system so I think 
education has to be a top 
priority for any elected 
official. 

Sun: How will you make 
yourself accessible to your 
constituents? 

Fabrizio: Earlier this 
month I had my first meeting 
at the Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School and we 
had between 18 and 20 people 
show up. I'll be advertising 
shortly .(to hold regular 
meetings) the first Thursday 
of each month from 7 to 9 
p.m. at the Lincoln-Hancock 
School. People can come by 
and attend an open forum- 
type meeting. It's their 
agenda; I'm there to listen. 

I want to share ideas with 
people; talk about problems 
and concerns and I intend to 
do that on a regular basis 
throughout my term. 

Sun: Are you bringing any 
particular legislative style to 
City Hall? 

Fabrizio: Well I prefer to 
stick with my ideology as I did 
throughout the campaign that 
this is a community first and 
foremost where people work. 
I want to protect the 
investment of working men 
and women and that includes 
curbing over or unwanted 
development, that includes 
raising the reputation of our 
school system, that includes 
being fiscally responsible. 

I believe I would rather 
work out some long-term 



plans on issues than just react 
to a particular problem when 
it happens. I think we do 
better when we plan ahead 
and we set some goals for 
ourselves rather than reacting 
to problems that come up. 

Sun: As you know, the city 
faces a $15 million deficit in 
fiscal 1990-91 which begins 
July I. Mayor James Sheets 
has proposed a sewer user fee 
to help balance the budget. Is 
this the right approach? 

Fabrizio: It appears at this 
time, based on the informa- 
tion I have been given, that we 
have two choices: to face a $ 1 5 
million deficit (without the 
fee) or a $6 million deficit 
(with the fee.) Either way it 
calls for hard work by elected 
officials to go through the 
departments to see that 
people get the services they 
are entitled to and that they 
want and at the same time, be 
fiscally responsible. 

I believe the mayor is intent 
on accomplishing those 
criteria. Sewer usage fee isn't 
something that is easily to be 
supportive of. On the other 
hand, it does appear at this 
time that a fee of some form is 
necessary. 

Sun: Since some residents 
might find the sewer user fee 
too expensive, do you have 
any other ideas on how the 
city can raise additional 
revenue? 

Fabrizio: It concerns me 
that those least able to pay for 
it are hurt the most. A 
working family with children 
obviously is going to consume 
much more than just a couple 
and that's why I am concerned 
about it. 

With regards to raising 
revenue, I think we have to 
take a close look at fees we 
charge. I would imagine that 
some of the prices the city 
charges for particular services 
are somewhat outdated and 
need to be raised. 

The administration needs 
to look very hard at attracting 
a type of industry which will 
produce some real revenue for 
this city. 

However, what I don't want 
to see is that I don't want us to 
become a city where we 
charge for every particular 
service. I'm opposed to the 
disposal fee which charges 
people extra for picking up 
rubbish. I don't believe the 
city should be in the business 
of imposing separate fees for 
every service we provide. 




CIO 



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Democratic 

Committee, 

QTA Skirmish 



Jan. 18-24 
1936 



Chairman Leo J. Halloran of the Democratic City 
Committee branded the Quincy Taxpayers Association 
"a straight-out Republican ^^^^^,,^^^^^^^^^ 
Organization" and named a 
committee to investigate it. 

"This is a party issue now 
and we must combat it," said 
George Leary, who was named 5,^. Years AfiO 
chairman of the committee 

along with William McDonaldH^HHiaMMi^H^^HHi 
and Arthur St. John. 

Meanwhile, the 4-year-old QTA voted to move its 
office out of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce 
headquarters in the Munroe Building. 1245 Hancock 
St.. and break its association with the chamber. 

QTA members cited the possibility of conflict of 
interest, saying: 

"The job of the Quincy Taxpayers Association is not 
to sell ideas calling for increasing expenditures or try to 
explain to its members why we should make exceptions. 
"Its job is to recognize the right of all taxpayers to 
benefit through equitable distribution of 
appropriations of their money to be expended by the 
city." 

FIRST STORM COSTLY 
The first big storm of the season brought out 1,200 
men, including 700 WPA workers, and 50 trucks to 
combat the snow at an estimated cost of $20,000, 
accor'^ing to Mayor Thomas S. Burgin. 

The heavy snow caused postponement of the annual 
St. Moritz Winter Carnival and hampered firefighters 
who battled a blaze that destroyed the Bonin Sea Grill 
on Sea St. 

GOP WOMEN SHOCKED 
Cong. Christian A. Herter (R-Boston) shocked the 
Republican women of Quincy when he disclosed that 
the federal Public Works Administration was financing 
a fan dancer in a mid-western state. 

"The fan dance act of a young woman had been 
censored but she had some political friends who created 
PWA Fan Dance Project No. I for her," he said. "Her 
work was to entertain the young men in a nearby CCC 
camp." 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Assistant Administrator Anthony J. Fenna said the 
weekly Works Progress Administration (WPA) payroll 
in Quincy was $19,251.28 for 1.379 workers, including 
296 women on sewing projects ... Chase and Sanborn's 
coffee was 22 cents a pound at Foy's Markets, 1 177 
Hancock St., Quincy Center, and 39 Franklin St., 
Quincy Adams ... THe City Council voted down a 
proposal to spend $500,000 on a new City Hall ... 
Romeo DiTullio's long basket with 15 seconds left in 
overtime gave the Quincy High School basketball team 
a 22-20 victory over North Quincy, its fourth win of the 
season ... Delcavare King of the Granite Trust Co. 
issued an appeal for support for President Franklin D. 
Roosevelt's Birthday Ball in the Armory Jan. 30, the 
proceeds of which were to go to the March of Dimes ... 
"Whatever we think of our Chief Executive as 
President," he said, "we are glad to honor him for the 
wonderful way in which he has risen above his infantile 
paralysis and we want to join him in doing our part to 
fight this dread disease" ... The playbill at the State 
Theater was "Love in Bloom" starring Burns and Allen: 
"Border Guns." with Bill Cody; and Chapter 7 of "The 
Roaring West" ... Heslip E. Sutherland was re-elected 
to the board of managers of the Woodward Fund and 
Property ... Southern fried chicken was cooked by 
Alabama Mammy Jones at Jim Murphy's St. Moritz 
Gardens on Willard St., West Quiancy ... Sammy 
Garcia of Quincy decisioned Domenic Salvati of EAst 
Boston to win the 118-pound state boxing title ... 
School Supt. James N. Muir presented a $1,221,624 
budget to Mayor Burgin, up $7,000 from the previous 
year ... John Marr Jr. was elected president of the 
Quincy Liquor Dealers Association ... Snow shovels 
were 55 cents, ice scrapers 29 cents and both 79 cents at 
Grossman's, 130 Granit St ... Chief War Eagle of 
Canada defeated British Champion Dick Bartlett two 
falls out of three in the main wrestling bout at the 
Quincy Arena ... The special $1 dinner at Howard 
Johnson's Restaurant in the Granite Trust Building 
included: Roast stuffed duckling, fruit cup. soup, 
tomato juice, potato, macadoine salad, home made 
rolls and a be\erage ... The Brown Mice, a Qumc\ 
literary club, met at the home of Mrs. Frank OgiUie. 
166 Fayette St.. Wollaston, to read and critici/c 
manuscripts . 



V 



Page 6 Quinc) Sun Thursday. January 18. 1990 

Asian New Year 
Festival At NQHS 



The second annual Chi- 
nese and Vietnamese New 
Year Festival for the City 
of Quincy will be held 
Sunday at 5:30 p.m. in the 
dining hall at North Quincy 
High School. 

The Festival, sponsored 
by the Asian-American Com- 
mittee of Quincy, Quincy 
City Schools, the North 
Quincy Human Relations 
Committee and the Chinese 
School of Quincy, will fea- 
ture an eight course Chinese 
banquet, catered by Quincy 
Jade Restaurant. 

The festival coordinator is 
Rev. Richard Man Chan 
Law of the Wollaston 
Lutheran Church. 

The keynote speaker for 
the event will be Richard 



Chin, newly appointed judge 
to the State Supreme 
Court. 

The Festival will also 
feature live entertainment, 
including a Chinese band, 
Contempo, A Korean Fan 
Dance, an Indonesian Bali 
dance, Chinese dolcimer 
music, a Mongolian dance, 
and a Chinese violin solo. 

Tickets to the event are 
available through the 
Wollaston Lutheran Church, 
550 Hancock St., at a cost of 
$10 for adults and $7 for 
children. 

Because last year's festi 
festival was so popular, 
advance tickets are strongly 
suggested. 

For further information 
call Pastor Law at 773- 
5482. 



20 Quincy Students In 
Volunteer Projects 
At Don Bosco 



Twenty Quincy seniors at 
Don Bosco Technical High 
School in Boston have been 
assigned volunteer projects 
which each musi perform for 
35 hours as a requirement for 
graduation. 

They are Michael S. 
Dunning, David McCloud 
and Richard J. Powers, all at 
Sacred Heart Parish CYO; 
Carmine J. Olivo, Carney 
Hospital, Dorchester; 
Stephen Aylward, New 
England Medical Center, 
Boston. 

James M. Collins, St. Ann's 
Parish Youth Basketball; 
Christopher E. Geno, St. 
John's Parish; Sean P. 
Gibbons, Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Parish; Jason W. 



Gordon, Murphy Com- 
munity School, Dorchester; 
Brian J. Hegarty, Leukemia 
Societv of America. 

Jeffrey M. Pugiiese, St. 
Agatha's Parish Youth 
Organization; John M. 
Grennon and Terence S. 
Hack, both at Don Bosco 
retreats; Mark P. McMillan, 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Parish; Daniel O'Flaherty 
and Kevin '. Burke, both Don 
Bosco retreats. 

Terrence Driscoll and 
Matthew J. Danick, Sacred 
Heart Parish; David H. 
McManus, St. Ann's School 
Basketball; and Kenneth A. 
Arnott, South Shore 
Educational Collaborative. 



Mr., Mrs. Michael McFarland 



Parents of 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
McFarland of 140 Summit 
Ave., Wollaston, are parents 
of a daughter, Tara Marie, 
born Jan. 2 at St. Margaret's 
Hospital for Women, Boston. 

Mrs. McFarland is the 



Daughter 

former Martha Sinclair. 

Grandparents are J. Arnold 
and Carolyn Sinclair of Barre, 
VT, and Thomas E. 
McFarland of Wollaston. The 
late Margaret McFarland was 
also a grandparent. 




Scarborough Players 

Concert At 
Fenno House 



The Scarborough Chamber 
Players will present a concert 
Friday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. at 
Fenno House Senior Citizen 
Residence, 540 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

The concert, funded in part 
by the Quincy Arts Council 
and the Mass. Arts Lottery, is 
free and open to the public. A 
reception will follow the 
performance. 

The Quincy based ensemble, 
now in its eighth season, will 
include for the Friday concert 
Anna Sorrano, soprano; 
Virginia Sindelar, flutist/ 
director; and Tatyana 
Dudochkin, pianist, a recent 



^Art And Flowers' 

Lecture At 
Historical Society 




VIRGINIA SINDELAR 

emigrant from the USSR and 
specialist in Russian music. 
They will perform works of 
Mozart, CPE. Bach, Chopin 
and Rachmaninov. 



Members and the public are 
invited to attend the "Quincy 
Remembers" lecture Wednesday, 
Jan. 24 at 1:30 p.m. at the 
Quincy Historical Society, 8 
Adams St., Quincy. 

The lecture entitled, "Art 
and Flowers" will be 
presented by Eleanore 
Tupper. Tupper, who is a 
member and past president of 
the Wollaston Garden Club, 
received her education at the 
School of the Museum of Fine 



Arts and Quincy Junior 
College. 

She has participated in 
exhibitions at the Museum oi 
Fine Arts, Milton Academy, 
Cape Cod Art Association 
and Quincy Art Association 
to name a few. In 1986, she 
coordinated the period 
decorations for the Adams 
National Historic Site as part 
of Holidays in Quincy. 

The program is free and 
refreshments will be served. 



UCP Benefit Brunch 
At Sons Of Italy 



An "all you can eat brunch" 
is scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 
21, from 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 
the Quincy Sons of Italy 
Lodge, 120 Quarry St. 

The Quincy Sons of Italy 
Lodge is requesting a $5 
donation, with all proceeds 
going to the United Cerebral 
Palsy, to aid the 700,000 
children and adults country- 
wide disabled by CP. 

This event will coincide 
with the United Cerebral 
Palsy's "Starathon" (Telethon) 
which will be broadcast live 



on WCVB-TV Channel 5. 
Also, Quincy radio station 
WJDA will broadcast live 
reports of the events 
scheduled during the brunch. 

The Sons of Italy Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts last 
year raised $35,000. This 
year's goal is $50,000, 
according to State President 
Angelo Furnari. 

More information may be 
obtained by calling Quincy 
Sons of Italy Special Events 
Chairman Denis Tardo at 
471-7254. 



45 Residents On 
Fontbonne Honor Roll 

Honorable Mention: Mary 
Driscoll, Lisa Mollomo. 
Brenda Riley, Gina Bianco. 
Maryellen Greene, Christine 
Donovan, Ellen Savage, 
Korey Walsh, Agata 
Szypszak, Karin Nantel, 
Dianne Monteith, Brenda 
Biggins, Jennifer Costale/. 
Elisabeth McAleney, Jill 
Kiley, Carolyn Carney. 
Maureen Donovan, Debra 
Callahan, Jennifer Carlson. 
Jennifer Rossi, Meghan 
Dufresne, Georgina Dwyer. 
Julieanne Healy, Audrc\ 
McGillicuddy, Shannon 
McLaughlin. 



The Fontbonne Academy 
first semester honor roll lists 
45 Quincy residents. 

They are: 

First Honors: Elizabeth 
Groom, Maggy Youssef, Eva 
Piotrowski, Stephanie 
Suchan, Kim Nhu, Patrice 
Gorman. 

Second Honors: Anna 
Kuczynski, Laura Pepdjonovic, 
Anne Driscoll, Mary-Jo 
Vieira, Emily Rose, Maureen 
Wilk, Katherine Callahan, 
Eileen Cahalane, Michelle 
Drury, Jennifer Toland, 
Deborah Rosengurt, Brenna 
Kinsley, Diane Kelly, Susan 
Shea 



Refugees And Immigrants 
Inter-Agency Council Topic 



The Inter-Agency Council 
of the South Shore will hold a 
luncheon meeting Tuesday, 
Jan. 23 at noon at the New 
Wing Conference Room of 
Quincy Hospital. 

Guest speaker will be Stan 
R. Nikkei, Ph.D., Executive 
Director of the Urbanistics 

Parent Council 



Foundation. His topic will be 
"The Changing Demography 
of the South Shore: Refugees 
and Immigrants." 

Reservations are $5. For 
more information call Pat 
Peers, treasurer of the Inter- 
Agency Council, at St. 
Boniface Church, 479-9200. 



Jewish War Veterans 

To Honor 6 
High School Students 



To Special Ed 
To Meet Jan. 24 

The Quincy Parent conference room at Stop & 



Advisory Council to Special 
Education will hold its bi- 
monthly Parents Support 
Group Wednesday, Jan. 24 at 
7:30 p.m. in the community 



Shop, Newport Ave., North 
Quincy. 

Parents and guardians of 
children with special needs are 
invited to attend. 



The 36th annual "Classmates 
Today - Neighbors Tomorrow" 
breakfast meeting of the 
Quincy Jewish War Veterans 
Post will be held Sunday, Feb. 
II, at 9:30a.m. at Beth Israel 
Synagogue, 33 Grafton St., 
Quincy Point. 

Six area high school 
students, chosen by their 
classmates as best exemplify- 
ing brotherhood in their daily 
activities, will be honored. 

They are Arlene Amo of 
Quincy High; Brian Glennon 
of North Quincy High, Craig 
Galligan of Quincy Vo-Tech. 



Scott Alexander Marsh ol 
Weymouth North, Robert \ 
McCarthy of Weymouih 
South, and Kevin P. Barnard 
of Hull High School. 

They will receive citations 
presented by local officials. 
leaders of veterans' organiza- 
tions, and JWV officers. Tht 
committee is headed by Past 
Commander Harvey Solomon. 
who is assisted by Commands 
Bertrand Shaffer, Past 
Commanders Dave Freedman, 
Irving Isaacson and Da\c 
Minkofsky, along with 
Comrades Paul Bailey and 
Herb Fontaine. 



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WEDDINGS 
Starting atMIO.oo 

331-0405 



RECEPTION HALLS 



PHOTOGRAPHER ■ BRIDAL FASHIONS 



Creative Bridals 



Photography 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



PRINTING ■ 



CHURCH PROGRAMS 

Your Pre-printed Covers 

or Custom Made 

THE QUINCY SUN 

1372 Hancock St.. 
Quincy Square 

471-3100 



54 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

472-7670 

Hours Tues, Wed, Thurs. 10-9 
"C FrI A Sat. 10-5 visa 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



"Have an 

affair with 

Amelia' 

Amelia's in Quincy 
overlooks Marina Bay. y 
with a panoramic view of g 
the Boston skyline. This P 
spacious 120 seat 
function room has an ^ 
extensive menu at J 
affordable prices This is I 
an open Invitation to join g 
us for that special J 
reception. 

Amelia Is waltlag 
f w irtur call! 



AMELIAS!? 



MARINA BAY 
305 Viclory Road 
North Quincy 471-1453 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

Telepfione 471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



QUINTREE 

FLORIST 

Specializing in Fresh & Silks 

Open 7 days and 6 nights 
444 Quincy Ave . Braintree 

848-9075 




Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 

'■II i 



Barry's 
Flower Shop 

Flowers for all occasions 

337-0970 

1000 Washington Street 

Braintree. MA 




Thursda>. January 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 7 



Social 




NATASHA ANASTASI 

Natasha Anastasi 
Engaged To David Trieb 



MR. and MRS. GLENN C. FKRGISON 

iHinry I'httlit) 

Diane Raftery Wed 
To Glenn Ferguson 



Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. 
Anastasi of Quincy announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Natasha Elizabeth 
to Machinist's Mate Petty 
Officer 3rd Class, David J. 
Trieb, U.S.N. 

Miss Anastasi is a second 
year registered nursing 
student at Quincy Junior 
College. She is a C.C.D. 
teacher at St. John's Church, 
Quincy and is employed by 
the John Adams Nursing 
Home in Quincy. She is a 1 988 



graduate of Archbishop 
Williams High School. 

Mr. Trieb recently 
graduated "with distinction" 
from the Navy's Nuclear Field 
"A" School, Naval Training 
Center in Orlando, Fla. He is 
in the Navy's Nuclear 
Submarine training program. 
He was a 1986 graduate of 
Blue Hills Regional Technical 
School. 

A March wedding is 
planned. 



Host Families Sought 
For Exchange Students 



Host Families are being 
sought for high school 
exchange students from 
Sweden, Norway, Denmark, 
Finland, Holland, Austria, 
Switzerland, Germany, 
Spain, Portugal, France, 
Italy, Brazil, Ecuador, New 
Zealand, Australia, Japan, 
Thailand and Yugoslavia for 
the school year 1990-91 in a 
program sponsored by the 
American Intercultural 
Student Exchange (AISE). 

The students, age 15 
through 17, will arrive in the 
United States in August, 
1990, attend a local high 
school, and return to their 
home countries in June, 1991. 
The students, all fluent in 
English, have been screened 



by their school representa- 
tives in their home countries 
and have spending money and 
medical insurance. 

Host Families may deduct 
$50. per month for income tax 
purposes. 

AISE is also seeking 
American High School 
Students, age 15 through 17, 
who would like to spend a 
High School Year in Sweden, 
Norway, Denmark, Germany, 
Switzerland, France, Spain, 
New Zealand or Australia or 
participate in a five week 
summer host family stay 
throughout Western Europe. 

Families interested in either 
program should call toll free: 
1-800-SIBLING. 



Diane O. Raftery, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. T. David 
Raftery of Quincy, and Glenn 
C. Ferguson, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Willard Ferguson of 
Wilton, Conn., were married 
recently at St. Joseph's 
Church, Quincy Point. 

A reception was held at the 
End Zone Motor Inn, 
Foxboro. 

Jennifer Raftery of Quincy 
was maid of honor for her 
sister. Bridesmaids were 
Ajeshah Raftery of Richmond, 
VT., the bride's sister-in-law; 
Christine Donovan, Lisa 
Hagerty and Kathleen 
Schiffman, all of Quincy. 

Thomas Newman of 
Burlington, VT, served as best 
man. Ushers included Hugh 
Ferguson of Wilton, CT, a 
brother of the bridegroom; 



David Raftery Jr. of 
Richmond, VT, the bride's 
brother; Kevin Callahan of 
Norwell and Edward Kane of 
Hingham. 

After a wedding trip to the 
Greek Islands, the couple are 
living in Quincy. 

The bride is an Archbishop 
Williams High School 
graduate. She attended 
Eastern Nazarene College, 
and graduated from Children's 
Hospital School of EEG 
Technology. She is an EEG 
technologist at the Veterans 
Administration Medical 
Center in Jamaica Plain. 

The bridegroom graduated 
from Wilton High School and 
from Purdue University in 
Indiana. He is president of 
Green Environmental, Inc. in 
Quincy. 



Lori Saire On Dean's List 



Lori J. Satre of North 
Quincy Mas been named to 
the D''-"-\ Lis; at the New 
England School of Art and 
Design. Boston. 

Save Gas and Money . . 
Shop Locally 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



She is a 1989 graduate of 
North Q'li'T'y High School. 



Craft Classes 

l-^aaei irlower J^ut 



377 Washington St. 
Quincy, MA 

is now featuring Craft Ciasses 

1st CLASS TO BEGIN 
JANUARY 24, 1990 

Ongoing Registration Accepted 
Cail or stop by for Registration 

(617) 479-5598 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERSM6 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 




WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 
PERM SPECIAL ^ 

UNIPERM ' 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 
CQ slightly higher 
, Complete 




PATRK L\ A. C ()( C K and Nl NZIO V. ( ARBONE 

tM< Inliri's Slinlio) 

Patricia Cocce Engaged 
To Nunzio Carbone 



The engagement of Patricia 
A. Cocce to Nunzio V. 
Carbone is announced by her 
parents, James R. and Joyce 
E. Cocce of Wollaston. 

Her fiance is the son of 
Angelo and Rose Carbone of 
Quincy. 

Miss Cocce and Mr. 
Carbone are both North 



Quincy High School 
graduates. She is a legal 
secretary employed by 
Peabody & Brown in Boston. 
Mr. Carbone, a 1988 graduate 
of Wentworth Institute of 
Technology, is an electronic 
engineer for Barry Controls in 
Watertown. 
A May wedding is planned. 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 

Golden Lion Suite 



^^ 



^& 







Sp«ak lo Rita - ih*'! our rtntal aganl 
tpaclallzlng In complaU wadding 
packaga plana and all other occailona. 
Tlw Goldan Lion Suit* accomodatet up 
to 300. The Vanatlan Room up to 140 
guattt. GIva Rita a call tor an 
appolntmant lor your raaarvaUon. Naw 
Ixochurat ara avallalMa. 

(Mr Condlllonad) 

CALL 

Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER is 472-5900 



iJLJJLJJLJJLJJLJJ^ 




Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Formerly the 

Winfield House Restaurant 



Christmas Sale Now On! 
thru Jan. 31st 

OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK 
Hours: Tues-Sat 10:00 AM-5:00 PM 
^ Sundays 12:00 Nuon-5:00 PM Cittsed Mondays 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



rTTTTTTTTl 'i* I 't' 1 YVVTi' 1 'i' 1 't' fi' flT'TTTTTTrTTin: 



All specials pertormed by one of Russells statt 



Russell Edward s 



Complete 
eU["U" en slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 

00°''°"^*''^^" Sculptured Nails 555^ 

of Russells statt . Pedicures $22 

Body and Facial Waxing Available 



lor longer hair 



itm 



cV .^/c44€A (f "^la^:, 




-nn^r/^A 



OPEN ^5 DAILY WFO T HUMS S FRI t^ VENINGS 



.'J^ 



0"'" .,c"' 



Senior 

Citizens 

Discount 



$o^>^ 



XiP 






fos 



,VvvO' 




472-1060 




2S Gre«n«M>od Ave 
WoNMton 



Closed Mondays 
Op«n Tuesday thru Saturday 
10 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. 

Opan Thu'S t>*s til I 30 



773-5266 



MM 



\^ 



Pafc 8 Quinc> Sun ThurMiay. January 18. 1990 



Martin Luther King Day Poster, Essay Winners 




NINE QUINCY SCHOOL children were recognized as the winners in a poster contest held in 
conjunction with the city's celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. From left, Robert 
Mantia, Central Middle; Jennifer Morton and Michael Costales, Squantum School; Grace 
Snedden and Robert McCole, Central; Allison Jones, Scott Stuart and James Foster, 
Merrymount. Missinf from picture b Ashley Rowerdink, Charles Bernazzani School. 

QHS Air Force Jr. ROTC 
Second In Competition 



FOUR HIGH SCHOOL students were also honored for writing the winning essays as part of 
the city's celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. From left, William Chu and Joanne 
Moriarity, North Quincy High; and Renee Barsanti, Susan McCole and Dean Morris, Quincy 



High. 



((Jiiiitcy Sun phnlos h\ i.harli-s h'lnfif:! 



The Quincy High School 
61st Air Force Junior ROTC 
Drill Team commanded by 
Cadet Lt. Col. Lorrie 
Swanton placed second in the* 



recent Second Invitational 
Drill Competition. 

The team competed against 
15 AFJRROTC drill teams 
including military academies. 



Their next competition is 
Saturday, Feb. 3 at Central 
High School, Springfield. 

T/Sgt. Edward Holland is 
the advisor for the drill team. 



St. Joseph's Spiritual 

Development Committee 

To Meet Jan. 22 



St. Joseph's Parish 
Spiritual Development 




Committee will meet 
Monday, Jan. 22 at 7 p.m. at 
St. Joseph School, 22 Pray 
St., Quincy Point. 

Theme for the evening will 
be "Praying the Scriptures." 

Guest speaker will be Jean 
Phelan, a local person who 
has been a member of Sacred 
Heart Parish for 14 years. She 
is presently a professor in 
charge of the Graduate 
Programs (Masters in 
Education) at the University 
of Massachusetts in Boston. 

A member of several 
Archdiocesan School Boards, 
Phelan is involved in the 
Cursillo program at the 
Archdiocesan level. She has 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



been a member of the 
Spiritual Development 
Commission (on the 
Archdiocesan level) for 
approximately six years. 

Following Phelan's talk, 
there will be three to five 
minutes of meditation and 
reflection. 

Refreshments will be served 
after the prayer meeting in the 
school hall. 

Everyone is welcome and 
encouraged to attend the 
meeting as the time nears for 
the parish-wide mission in 
March. 

People are invited to attend 
and pray together for the 
success of the upcoming 
mission and to listen to an 
inspiring speaker. 

Anyone needing transpor- 
tation may call the rectory 
and arrangements will be 
made. 



+ 



American 
Red Cross 



BEECHWOOD 
MUSIC SCHOOL 

WINTER CLASSES 

• Private Lessons in all 

instruments 

• Free music theory class 

• Music for the very young 

• Exploring Music 

• Music theater class 

• Special Nee<js music class 

• Scholarships available 

• "Dancing Around The World" 

with Nikki Hu 

• Piano keyboard class 

• Saturday lessons and classes 

now available 

BEECHWOOD COMMUNITY 
LIFE CENTER 

225 Fenno Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 



Teen 
May 



Age Dances 
Be Banned 
After Fighting 



Ihursday, Januar> 18. 1990 Quincy Sun Page 9 



H-ont'd from l>af(v I) 

submitted a letter to the 
Board Jan. 15 which included 
police reports from two 
separate incidents at the 
Quincy Bay Inn during 
teenage dances. 

According to the police 
report issued by Officer C. 
Middendorf, last Friday, Jan. 
12, a fight broke out in the 
parking lot of the Quincy Bay 
Inn, involving "approximate- 
ly 20 to 30 youths." 

After trying to break up the 
fight, the officer was forced to 
use mace. There were no 
arrests made, the report 
states, although one "night 
stick was taken from a white 
male during the fight." The 
fight broke up and all parties 
dispersed, the report said. 

In another incident at a 
teenage dance held last Nov. 
24, Officer Middendorf 
submitted a police report 
detailing "several fights inside 
involving blacks and whites," 
during which one hhrk youth 



was seen by police with a gun 
and another black youth was 
reported as having a gun. 

When police and the 
management of the establish- 
ment shut down the dance at 
1 1 p.m. more fights broke out 
outside the club and 
assistance was called. 

When Officer Middendorf 
witnessed a black youth point 
a gun at another youth, he was 
forced to draw his own 
weapon at which point the 
suspect ran off with the 
weapon, the report states. 

According to Laracy's 
letter to the Board, during the 
November incident "we had 
almost all our on duty officers 
and assistance from over 10 
Metro Police Officers to 
disperse the crowd outside the 
Quincy Bay Inn." The crowd 
was estimated at "approxi- 
mately 100," in the police 
report. 

In his letter, Laracy told the 
Board that the matter of 
Friday night teenage dances is 



a "situation that must be 
addressed immediately before 
a serious problem arises." He 
noted the recent violence at 
Vincent's in Randolph during 
a teenage dance held there. 
Vincent's has since cancelled 
teenage dances, Laracy noted, 
"so next Friday night could be 
a big night at the Quincy Bay 
Inn." 

Laracy told the board on 
Tuesday that the management 
at the Quincy Bay Inn is 
"excellent." 

"They've done everything 
they can do." He said that it is 
"the number of kids 
attending" (some 400) which 
presents the problem. 

While Board Chairman 
John Gillis said Tuesday he is 
in favor of permanently 
cancelling all teenage dances 
at the club. Police Chief 
Francis Finn maintained that 
the management of Quincy 
Bay Inn should be allowed to 
discuss the matter before the 
board. 

By JANE ARENA 



Restaurant Hearing Continued 



The License Board Tuesday 
continued until Jan. 23 at 10 
a.m., a hearing concerning 
closing regulation and fire 
code violations which were 
reported at Kelly's In The 
Square, 15 Cottage Ave., on 
the night of last Dec. 23. 

Atty. Richard Barry, 
representing Kelly, was before 
the board and requested the 
continuation so that the 
official report, submitted by 
fire and police officials, can be 
further investigated. 

The board was also told 



that owner Peter Kelly was in 
the hospital on Tuesday and 
could not appear before the 
board. 

According to reports by 
Deputy Fire Chief Tom 
Gorman and Police Officer 
Paul Keenan, customers and a 
bartender were seen drinking 
in the restaurant after the 
regulated 1:15 a.m. closing 
regulation. 

The alleged violation was 
discovered after a dry powder 
fire extinguisher had been 
discharged, causing smoke 



detectors to activate ana me 
fire alarm to sound, the report 
said. 

According to City Fire 
codes, all customers must be 
evacuated from a building 
when a fire alarm sounds. 

According to the report, 
there were customers in the 
building after the alarm 
sounded and fire personnel 
arrived. 

Kelly has been instructed to 
appear before the Board to 
"show just cause why his 
license should not be 
permanently revoked." 



Now Located Throughout the South Shore 



HOME INCOME TAX SERVICE 



• Prepared in Your Home 

• Private & Personal 

• Experienced Tax Professionals 

"You Cant Miss With HITS" 

Will come to your Home or Business 
by appointment only 



A/\A•^ 




CALL in a HITS PROFESSIONAL Today 
1-800-321-HITS 



wh«n it comes 
to insaroncQ we 

keep good 
componies 

We represent many fine insurance 
companies. And we select the company 
we think can best suit^our insurance 
needs — whether it's coverage for your 
car, your home or your business. 

For insurance with an independent 
point of vievy, give us a call. 



bQfiy 



Waltham 

12 WESTON ST 



insurance agency inc. 

685 HArtCOCK STREET. QUINCY 

479-5500 



Franklin 

9 MAIN ST 



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940 MAIN ST 



894-1214 528-5200 668-2900 




ATHERTON HOUGH SCHOOL is the first elementary school in Quincy to receive a 
computer from Stop & Shop. Gathered around the new educational equipment are, from left. 
Assistant Principal Hank Logan; John Katsarikas, Lorie Hammerstrun, program director for 
Atherton Hough; third grade teacher Jeanne Donroe and Andrea Capallano. At the computer 
controls are Lisa Pattern and John McGrath. iQnim-^ Sim phuiit h\ Tom (iormani 



City Seeks Permit 
For Quincy Bay Outfall 



The City of Quincy is 
seeking permission from the 
U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers to connect a 90- 
foot extension to a 24-inch 
reinforced concrete storm- 
water outfall in Quincy Bay. 

The application for the 
federal permit was filed with 
the Engineers in accordance 
with Section 10 of the Rivers 
and Harbors Act which 



provides for federal 
regulation of any work in, 
under or over navigable 
waters of the United States 
and Section 404 of the Clean 
Water Act which regulates the 
discharge of dredged or fill 
material in United States 
waters, including wetlands. 

To assist in evaluating the 
proposed work, the Engineers 



are soliciting public 
comments. Written state- 
ments should be forwarded to 
their office no later than 
Monday, Feb. 12. Additional 
information may be obtained 
by contacting Peter Kube at 
the New England Division, 

U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, 424 Trapelo Rd., 
Waltham, MA 02254-9149. 



A Community Loan Fund? 




\t 



The Nibernia Savings Banic offers 

preferred rates and terms for 
Quincy, Braintree and Weymouth. 

1YEAR 

Adjustable Rate Mortgage 



RATE 



APR 



9.50% I 10.31% 



Loans up to $225,000 
30 YEAR MORTGAGE 



3 YEAR 

Adjustable Rate Mortgage 



RATE 



APR 



10.375% I 10.61% 



Loans up to $225,000 
30 YEAR MORTGAGE 



We have established a $20,000,000 loan fund with 
special rates and terms for residential properties located 
in Quincy, Braintree, and Weymouth. 

There is no application fee, no points, no credit 
report fee, no appraisal fee, and no PMI required 
with a Community Loan Fund mortgage. And your 
rate is set at the time of application at no additional 
cost to you. 

We are your community bank and with these loans, we 
are making home ownership easier and more affordable. 
For more information about the Community Loan Fund, 
come in today, or call Roger Meade at (617) 479-2265. 

The Wbemia Savings Bank 

Wesay''VK7 



731 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA (617) 479-2265 

101 Federal Street, Boston, MA (617) 345-0441 

51 Commercial Street, Braintree, MA (617) 848-5560 

Member FDIC DIFM 



12} 



\ 



Pa|>r 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1990 





Cemniuiiity Service Page 



Quincy Lodge of Elks 

No. 943 
440 E. Squantum Street 



Frank Evans Co 

343 Newport Avenue 




United Cerebral Palsy 
'All You Can Eat' 



Benefit Brunch 

sponsored by 

Sons of Italy 
Quincy Lodge #1295 

120 Quarry Street - Quincy 

! 

Sunday, January 21 
11 AM - 4 PM 




I 



WJDA 



All you can eat 

Hot & Cold Buffet Brunch 

Adults $5 Children $3 

For more information 479-9377 

Proceeds to benefit 

United Cerebral Palsy 
^wcvBiVBosion 

Live Channel 5 Remote 



Cable Ch, 3 



The Quincy Sun Community Service Page 
spotlight* on special events and civic projects of 
non-profit and charitable organizations in Quincy. 
The page is sponsored by the following clvlc- 
mindod Quincy business firms. 

• FINANCIAL 
Colonial Federal Savings Bank 

15 Beach Street 

Granite Banl( 

440 Hancock Street 
100 Granite Street 

The Cooperative Bank 

85 Quincy Avenue 



Quincy Savings Bank 

4 Locations in Quincy 

• FRATERNAL 

Quincy Lodge of Elks No. 943 

440 E. Squantum Street 

Sons of Italy Quincy Lodge No. 1295 

120 Quarry Street 



• HOME HEALTH CARE 
Quincy Visiting Nurses Assoc. 

1120 Hancock St. 



I HOME REMODELING 

Frank Evans Co. 

343 Newport Avenue 

I INSURANCE 

Burgin & Plainer insurance 

14 Franklin Street 

Doran & Horrigan insurance 

19 Billings Road 

» NEWSPAPER, PRINTING 
The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. 

1372 Hancock Street 



Thursda\. January 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Paje II 



Panama Delayed 
Their Christmas 



License Board Briefs 



(Cont'd from Pane /> 

hesitate when asked how 
he feels now. 

"I'm proud," he says. "I 
am happy for what we did 
for the people of Panama. 
The people there were very 
appreciative too, they were 
happy that we went in to 
take (Noriega) out of 
power... most of the 
people there were happy 
with what we did, and it 
was just something that 
had to be done. 

"We weren't happy that 
we had to sacrifice 
brothers in arms," he 
continues, "but we're 
happy with what we've 
done." 

This, he explains, was 
not the first time he had 



been to Panama. He was in 
the country in 1987 for 
JOTC (jungle training), 
and he likes the country 
and its people. 

Mallory was also in 
Ranger School in 1987 and 
trained in Fort Benning, 
Ga., Utah, and Florida. He 
graduated first in his class 
and was decorated by the 
Secretary of the Army. 

He also took part in the 
45th Anniversary of the 
Invasion of Normandy in 
France, and re-enacted the 
whole battle on the beach. 

Besides his parents, 
Stephen also has a sister, 
Debbie living in Wollaston. 
Two older brothers, Ray 
and Paul Mallory, live in 



Virgmia. 

Nancy Mallor/s parents, 
Philip and Jo Anne 
.lohnston, formerly of 
Wollaston, now live in 
Ontario, Canada. They 
spent time with their 
daughter in North 
Carolina while Stephen 
was at war. A sister, Patty 
Garofalo, lives in Revere. 

Now Mallory and 
Nancy are looking forward 
to a reunion with family 
and friends in Quincy. 

"And you can tell all my 
friends to meet me at Dee 
Dee's when I get there," 
Stephen says, "and they 
can all buy me a beer." 

It sounds like he's 
earned it. 



Quincy Attorney Helps 
Tear Down Berlin Wall 



The License Board took the 
following action at Tuesday's 
meeting at City Hall: 

• Granted a request from 
Santa Ferrara of Center 
Stage, 1 585 Hancock St., for a 
cabaret license for the 
purpose of having a piano 
player as background music. 
Ferrara told the Board she has 
no plans to expand into a 
nightclub. 

• Granted a request for a 
change of manager at the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks No. 
943, from Edward F. Shine to 
Patrick C. MacDonald, a 
bartender at the establish- 
ment. The request was 
granted providing that 
MacDonald do all he can to 
"clean up" the lodge, both 
inside and out. 

• Granted a request from 
John Palisi of New England 
Auto Recovery, 1 1 1 Penn St., 



to store up to 12 vehicles on 
the property. The license is 
pending an agreement with 
the Building Department 
concerning site screening. 

• Granted a request from 
the Furnace Brook Golf Club, 
Inc. for a change of manager 
from Everett A. Bragdon to 
Malcolm S. Holm. The 
request was granted pending a 
routine police check on Holm. 

• Granted a request from 
William B. Calapa of Original 
Joseph's Catering and 
Restaurant, 273 Willard St., 
to add 10 or 12 seats to the 
establishment which currently 
has a take out only license. 
The Board granted the 
request subject to the 
approval of the Building 
Department on zoning and 
parking regulations. 

• Allowed to withdraw 
without prejudice a request 



from Tom Connolly of Tom 
Connolly Leasing, Inc., 165 
Hancock St., for a Motor II 
license to sell used cars. The 
Board and Ward Councillor 
Thomas Nutley agreed that a 
used car lot is undesireable in 
the area which is an entrance 
to the City. 

• Granted a request from 
Granite Rail Restaurant, 
Cottage Ave., for one pinball 
machine and one video game 
machine. The license was 
granted subject to an 
inspection by the Fire and 
Building Departments to 
ensure the machines do not 
block exits. 

• Postponed for two 
weeks a hearing concerning a 
complaint by Barbara 
Elsayed, Independence Ave. 
on the Varsity Club, 33 
Independence Ave. because 
she was unable to appear 
before the Board on Tuesday. 




(Cont'd from Pajiv I) 

Wilhelm Church, which 
was bombed by the US 
during World War II, was 
left (in that condition) as a 
symbol of war," he said. 

Burke said he also had 
the chance to talk to both 
East and West Germans 
and reported a lasting 
feeling of "jubilation," 
even among armed East 
German guards. 



"Everyone is very 
happy," he said. "Everyone 
we talked to was still real 
excited and seemed 
generally excited about 
(the prospect oO reunifica- 
tion." 

Burke also said that the 
attitude toward Americans 
in East Germany is one of 
"extreme friendliness." 

"We got a preat 



^Confused About Confusion?' 
Elderly Coalition Topic 

The South Shore Coalition 
of Workers with the Elderly 
will meet Wednesday, Jan. 17 
from noon to 1:30 p.m. at 
1000 Southern Artery Senior 
Citizens Housing Activity 
Room on the mall. 

Dr. Sanford Auerbach, 
director of Behavioral 
Neurology Unit, University 
Hospital, will present a 
program entitled "Confused 
about Confusion?" 



He will discuss evaluating 
older clients who appear 
confused or forgetful and 
resources available for this 
type of evaluation. 

He will also speak on when 
a person should be referred 
for behavioral/ neurological 
testing, what this entails as 
well as different diagnosis and 
options for management. 



reception here," he said. 

After chipping at the 
wall, Burke took some 
time to sample the beer in 
Germany, which, he said, 
is "very good." 

Before returning home 
Saturday, Burke and his 
party will travel 600 miles 
by train from Berlin to 
Paris. 

By JANE ARENA 



LOWEST 



PRICED 



PICTURE 



FRAMING 



There are ancient dry river channels on Mars; the largest are about 620 miles long 
and over 100 miles wide. 



The Mane Connection 



291 QUINCY AVENUE 
QUINCY, MA 02169 

773-4655 
Tues., Fri., Sat., 9-5, Wed., Thurs. till 8:00 



Plenty of 
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Parking 



KENNEDY 
STUDIOS 



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773-6611 



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and Thurs. 

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only 

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Saturday 

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only 
* $1500 

Reg. »20'» 




Offtr Good Only With 
Barbie Cahill 



Please Call for Appointments 

•First Time Customers Only Offer good thru Marcfi 31, 1990 




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Pafc 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1990 



Church News 



Calling The Disciples Sermon 
At Covenant Congregational 



Bishop Hart To Officiate 

Rev. Charles Logue 

To Be Installed 

Blessed Sacrament Pastor. 



The Rev. Charles Logue 
will be officially installed as 
pastor of Most Blessed 
Sacrament Parish Sunday, 
Jan. 21, at the 10:30 a.m. 
Mass with Bishop Daniel 
Hart officiating. 

A reception will be held 
immediately following in St. 
Thomas Aquinas Hall. 

Fr. Logue has been pastor 
of the church since Jan. 4, 
1990, following the resigna- 
tion of the Rev. Denis 
O'Driscoll for health reasons. 

A Chaplain with the Army 
since 1959, Fr. Logue studied 
for the priesthood at St. 



John's Seminary, Brighton, 
and was ordained on May 6, 
1948 by Archbishop Richard 
J. Cushing at Holy Cross 
Cathedral. 

His first assignment was to 
St. Rita Parish, Lowell. In 
late 1948 he was released for 
lend-lease service >" ♦>"* 
Diocese of Fargo, ND, where 
he served until 1953 when he 
returned to Boston and was 
assigned to St. Peter Parish, 
Cambridge. 

After six years in 
Cambridge, Fr. Logue joined 
the Army and served as a 
chaplain in Texas. In 1961 he 



returned to Boston and went 
to St. Mary Parish, Waltham. 
In 1965, he reentered the 
Army and served since then in 
Alabama, California, at 
Camp 2Lama, Japan, at Fort 
Leonard Wood, MO, and in 
Stuttgart, Germany before 
returning in 1981 to Fort 
Devens, MA, later serving in 
Livorno, Italy. 

Most Blessed Sacrament, 
his first parish, was 
established in 1915. Plans are 
underway for a 75th 
anniversary celebration in 
April. 



At the 10:45 a.m. worship 
Sunday at Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
Rev. Kathleen Graves, co- 
pastor with Rev. Kirk 
Johnson, will preach. Her 
theme will be the calling of the 
disciples and our need to 
respond to God. 

The choir will be directed 
and accompanied on the 
organ by Richard Smith, 
Minister of Music. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for ages nursery 
through adult, will begin at 
9:30 a.m. During the service a 
nursery is available for 
childrf" "2? f"'"" ":•"' 



"T. 



The attendant will be Ida 
Taylor. For children up to age 
twelve, there is junior church, 
led by Arlene Morse during 
the month of January. 

Immediately following the 
worship service, coffee will be 
served in the fellowship hall 
downstairs. Nancy and Don 
Johnson will be serving for 
the month of January. 
Activities for the week are: 
Saturday, Jan. 20 at 8 a.m. 
the men's prayer breakfast, at 
9 a.m. an all-church work day. 
Workers are asked to bring 
buckets, sponges and rags and 
wear old clothes. Specific 
areas will be assigned to 
specific groups. 



On Sunday, Jan. 21 at 6:30 
p.m. the family night program 
will be "Favorite Music." 
Everyone should bring their 
favorite piece of music on tape 
or record or ready to perform. 

The annual meeting on 
Sunday, Jan. 28 and coming 
events include a Lenten 
lecture series by F. Burton 
Nelson of Chicago, a 
Bonhoffer scholar. An Ash 
Wednesday service will be 
held Feb. 28. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



Rev. Timothy Ashton 
To Speak At United First Parish 



Fr. 



James Tuxbury 
American Legion State Chaplain 



Rev. James Tuxbury, 
parochial vicar of St. John's 
Parish in Quincy, has been 
elected State chaplain of the 
Massachusetts Chapter of the 
American Legion. 

Fr. Tuxbury, a Lynn 
native, served in the Navy 



after graduating from high 
school. In 1976, he was 
national chaplain of the 
American Legion. 

For the past three years, he 
has served as Legion Chaplain 
for the American Legion in 



Massachusetts as well as 
being chaplain for the Suffolk 
County Legion. 

He is a member of the 40 
and 8 of the Legion, a group 
that raises funds for disabled 
and hospitalized veterans. 



This Sunday, the Rev. 
Timothy Ashton will lead the 
10:30 a.m. service and deliver 
the sermon at United First 
Parish Church Unitarian in 
Quincy Center. Dr. Ashton 
has served Unitarian 
Universalist Churches in 
Brockton, Mass., and 
Roanoke, Virginia. He 
currently serves as executive 
director of the Massachusetts 
Bay District of the Unitarian 
Universalist Association. 

The Church Choir, under 
the direction of Norman 



Corey, will sing anthems by 
Zingarelli and Haydn. Mr. 
Corey will also play organ 
works by Gibbons, Walcha 
and Reger. 

Visitors are welcome and 
are invited to attend the social 
hour following the service. 
Joe and Ginny McDermott 
and Bob and Carol Brainerd 
will host the social hour. 
Richard and Edna Allen will 
usher, and Ruth Keating will 
be greeter. 

In the Church School, the 
Level 1 class will hear the 
story "The Little Red 



Lighthouse" and discuss ways 
even the smallest can make 
important contributions. 
Teacher Joyce Sullivan will 
lead the children in making 
their own model lighthouses 
to bring home. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the Presidents," is 
located at 1306 Hancock St. 
in Quincy Center, opposite 
City Hall. There is a church 
school for children and youth, 
and child care is provided. 
Call 773-1290 for informa- 
tion. 



WoUaston Congregational 
Annual Meeting Jan. 28 



^The Amistad Affair' 
Sermon Topic At Bethany 



The Wollaston Congre- 
gational Church annual 



Union Congregotionol 
Church of Wollaston 

Beach Street at Rawson ft ■d 

Church School 9 a.m. 
Sun. Worship 10 a.ni. 

479-6661 (Child Care Provided) 
Rev Zaven Dohanian. Pastor 

Join Us In Faith 
and Fellowship 



meeting will be held on 

Sunday, Jan. 23 at 1 1:45 a.m. 

Everyone is invited to 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner Southern Artery 
and Washington St . Quincy 

Oiurdi School 9:30 AJL 
Wordiipal 10:30 AJL 

Rev Fred Atwood-Lyon 

Rev Carol E Atwood-Lyon 

773-6424 (Child Care provided) 

Call The Daily Bible 4/2-4434 



attend and church members 
should make a special effort 
to come. 

Please bring a brown bag 
lunch. The tustees will serve 
coffee and dessert. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here'* a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



The Covenant Congregational Church 

315 Whitwell Street, Quincy 

Invites YOU to worship 
with them each Sunday 



Morning Worship 

10:00 8.m. 

Rev. Kathleen J. Graves 

Rev. KIrfc E. Johnson 

Pastors 




The continuing struggle for 
human rights and justice in 
the light of the Christian 
Faith, will be the theme of the 
worship at Bethany Congre- 
gational Church this Sunday. 

Due to the illness of the 
senior minister. Rev. J. 
William Arnold, the sermon 
intended for last Sunday was 
postponed to this Sunday. 

"The Amistad Affair" deals 
with the events following the 
mutiny of slaves on a Spanish 
ship, who seized the vessel, 






CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHURCH 



b> 



65 Washington Stroet 

Quincy, MA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

Sunday School 9.30 a.m. 

Morning Worship i0:45 a.m. 

Evening Service 6 00 p.m. 

Wed. Evenings 700 p.m. 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 
10:45 AM: Guest Speaker Ray Islelb 

Appointee to Japan 
6:00 PM: A Tough Job 
Affiliated with: Baptist General Conference 
Northeast Baptist Conference 



m 



gained their freedom, and 
touched land off Long Island. 
The subsequent court trials 
focused national attention on 
the issue of slavery and 
racism, making possible 
beginning strides toward 
justice and human rights the 
effects of which are still 
significant in present 
American life and law. 

Bethany, a congregation of 
the United Church of Christ, 
is located at the corner of 
Coddington and Spear Sts., 
Quincy Center. There are two 
services, at 9 a.m. in the 
chapel and at 10 a.m. in the 
sanctuary. 

Lay scripture readers will 
be William F. Greene at the 
early service and Shirley Pyne 
at the sanctuary service. Rev. 
Elizabeth M. Upton, 
associate minister, will be the 
liturgist at both hours. 

At the sanctuary service the 
Chancel Choir, under the 
direction of organist Charles 
J. Blue, Sr. will sing as the 
anthem, "How Lovely Are the 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 
Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informal look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St.. Quincy 773-1021 




Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School St. Quincy, Mats 

PASTOR 
Rev. William R. McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev. James C. Tuxbury 

Rev. Gary S. Sullivan 

Rev. Richard McEntee 

Rev. Theodore L. Fortier 

(Quincy City Hoaplial Chaplain) 

Rev. Mr. Charles Sullivan, 



Messagers that Preach Us the 
Ciospel of Peace" by 
Mendelssohn and as the 
offertory "Send Out Thy 
Light and Thy Truth" by 
Gounod. 

The service will be 
broadcast live direct from 
Bethany's sanctuary at 10 
a.m. over radio station 
WJDA, 1300 kc. 

Sunday School will also be 
in session from 10 to 11 a.m. 
with classes for pre-school 
through 9th grade. Child care 
is also provided for babies and 
toddlers. 

Beginning at I I a.m. 
immediately following the 
late service, a fellowship time 
with hght refreshments will be 
held in the Allen Parlor. 

Individuals and families 
from the area are welcome to 
attend the worship and 
fellowship, and to enroll 
children in the Sunday 
School. 

Tuesday evening, January 
23, 7:30 to 9:00 p.m., Pastor 
Arnold will lead a Bible Study 
on "Peter: A Journey in 
Faith." The study is open to 
everyone and will take place 
in room 3 at the Church. 

For additional information 
about Bethany's programs 
and ministries, contact the 
church office at 479-7300. 



mm 




(Oaacon) 

MASS SCHEDULE 



Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 
Sunday: 7:00. 9:00 am, 11 am. 12:30 and 5:30 pm ^ 
Week Days: 8 am and 5:30 pm 



Confessions in Chapel 
' Sat 3-3:45 PM 
Rectory-21 Gay St 




Wollaston Church 
of the :Nazarene 




37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 
— Services — 

Sund»» 11 00 » m * 6 00 
Wrdnetday 7 00 p m 

"Your Community Church 



Thursday. Januar> 18. 1990 Quinc\ Sun Pavr 13 




Real Estate News 




Lower Mortgage Rates 

Increase Home Buyers 

Purchasing Power 



Homeowner's Insurance; 
Protecting Your Castle 



On a national scale, home 
buying conditions improved 
slightly in November, due to 
steady declines in mortgage 
interest rates, according to a 
National Association of 
Realtors report early this 
month. 

NAR's housing affordabil- 
ity index, which tracks 
monthly changes in home 
buyers' purchasing power, 
measured 105.8 in November, 
up from 105.5 in October. At 
105.8, the index shows that a 
family earning the national 
median income of $33,482 for 
November had 105.8 percent 
of the income needed to 
qualify for convential 
financing covering 80 percent 
of a home priced at $93,000, 
the median existing-home 
price for that month. 

Half the families in the 
United States earn more than 
the median income and half 
earn less. Likewise, half the 
existing single-family homes 
sell for more than the median 
price and half sell for less. 

NAR recorded an increase 
in the national housing 
affordability index in 
November because the 
interest rate used to calculate 
the index declined from 10.16 
percent in October to 10.12 
percent in November, and 
because the median family 
income rose, from $33,365 to 
$33,482. These two factors 
offset a slight increase in the 
national median price, which 
rose from $92,600 to $93,000. 

The changes in the national 
median home price, mortgage 
rate, and median income 
between October and 
November resulted in an 
increase of only $1 in the 
monthly mortgage payment, 
which was $660 in November. 

The November index was 
the highest since February, 
when the index measured 
106.7. One year ago, it 



measured 112.5. Since late 
summer, home buyers have 
regained some purchasing 
power lost earlier this year, 
when mortgage rates were at a 
higher level, noted NAR 
President Norman D. Flynn. 

"We continue to see buyers 
taking advantage of favorable 
financing. The drop in rates 
generally is having the most 
impact in areas where housing 
is affordable for moderate- 
income buyers," Flynn said. 

When NAR's monthly 
housing affordability index 
measures 100.0, the median 
family income equals exactly 
the amount needed to qualify 
to purchase a median-price 
home, using conventional 
fmancing and making a 20 
percent down payment. 
Because the national median 
income in November 
exceeded the qualifying 
income, a family earning the 
$33,482 median income could 
purchase a home priced at 
$98,400, $5,400 higher than 
the median price for 
November. 

Under November's afford- 
ability conditions, a family 
earning $20,000 would have 
sufficient income to qualify 
for a $58,800 home using a 
$47,000 loan. A family 
earning $30,000 would qualify 
for an $88,100 home with a 
$70,500 loan. A family 
earning $40,000 would have 
sufficient income to qualify 
for a $117,500 home with a 
$94,000 loan; and a family 
with a $50,000 income would 
qualify for a $146,900 home 
using a $117,500 loan. 

Although home buying 
conditions have eased overall, 
wide gaps in housing 
affordability still separate 
local markets, said NAR 
Chief Economist John A. 
Tuccillo. "In many cases, the 
slow markets tend to be high- 



cost areas out of reach for the 
middle-income buyer," 
Tuccillo said. "Rate declines 
haven't been sufficient to turn 
those markets around." 

In expensive markets, 
people trying to make the 
transition from renting to 
homeownership continue to 
face much greater purchasing 
obstacles than repeat buyers, 
he added. 

NAR's monthly index 
measures the home buying 
ability of buyers of all 
incomes. The association 
publishes a separate quarterly 
index, which measures the 
home buying ability of first- 
time buyers. The most recent 
first-time home buyer 
affordability index, for the 
third quarter of 1989, showed 
that on a national basis, first- 
time buyers had only 71.0 
percent of the income needed 
to buy a typical starter home. 
The mortgage rate used to 
calculate the November 
housing affordability index is 
a composite of closing rates 
offered for both fixed-rate 
mortgages and adjustable- 
rate mortgages for existing 
homes as reported by the 
Federal Housing Finance 
Board. 

When calculated with the 
Federal Housing Finance 
Board's effective fixed-rate 
mortgage interest rate of 
10.34 percent for November, 
the housing affordability 
index was 103.8. When 
calculated with the effective 
adjustable-rate mortgage 
interest rate of 9.32 percent 
for November, the index was 
113.3. 

The National Association 
of Realtors, the nation's 
largest trade association, is 
the voice for real estate, 
representing more than 
800,000 members involved in 
all aspects of the real estate 
industry. 



Homeowner's insurance 
protects the roof over your 
head and the possessions 
under that roof against a 
variety of losses and claims. 

And of all the forms of 
insurance you can get, 
homeowner's insurance is the 
mosi comprehensive and 
economical. Since your home 
is most likely your single 
largest investment, that's 
good news in these days of 
spiraling insurance costs. 

While homeowner's 
insurance is generally broad, 
it's important that your policy 
be tailored to your personal 
needs. Different policies and 
coverage options can extend 
your protection to claims 
ranging from million dollar 
libel suits, to earthquake and 
flood damage. 

Types of Coverage: 
Generally, homeowner's 
insurance combines into a 
single policy coverages 
for your home, its contents 
and your liability for harm to 
others. Coverage for floods, 
earthquakes and certain other 
perils usually come in 
separate policies. 

You can obtain homeown- 
er's either through an 
independent agent who 
represents several companies, 
or directly from an agent for 
one of the major insurance 
carriers. In either case, this 
agent may be the same person 
who provides your car and life 
insurance. Agents are listed in 
the Yellow Pages under both 
the carrier's name and 
"insurance agents." 

The two standard home- 



Quincy 



super special 2 

Colonial, great 

good condition. 



Nancy Quill Promoted At WMJX FM 

programming skills," Smyth 



Peter H. Smyth, vice 
president and general 
manager of Magic 106.7 
WMJX FM, announces that 
Nancy Quill of Quincy has 
been promoted to Assistant 
Program Director at the 
station. 

Quill began her career with 



the station in 1981 as an Air 
Personality and Music 
Director. Prior to joining 
WMJX, she was an Air 
Personality with WCGY and 
WCCM radio in Lawrence 
from 1979 to 1981. 

"Nancy has demonstrated 
outstanding music and 



said. "In recognition of her 
great achievements at WMJX 
over the past eight years, I am 
pleased for this promotion for 
Nancy." 

A 1981 graduate of the 
University of Lowell, QuiW 
has a bachelors degree in 
Music and Education. 



Four Promoted At O'Connor And Drew 



O'Connor and Drew, P.C, 
certified public accountants 
of Quincy, announce the 
promotions of Mark Dow, 
CPA, Edward Follen, Joseph 
Mazzotta, CPA and Albert 
Vasile, Jr., CPA to supervisor 
accountants. 

Supervisor accountant 
responsibilities include daily 



direction of the field work of 
many major engagement and 



the training 
accountants. 



of staff 



Quincy • 

bedroom 
location, 
$149,900 

Quincy - Penns Hill Cape, 5 
rooms, 2 bedrooms, garage 
under, large yard, $154,900 

Quincy - 6 room stucco 
Colonial. A short walk to 
schools, shopping and 
N.Q.T. $154,900 

Quincy - charming and 
delightful 4 bedroom Dutch 
Colonial, slate roof, 
picturesque setting, 
$179,900 

Yes you can - we will help 
you qualify. The mortgage 
companies have many 
programs. One call is all we 
need. 

Century 21 
Annex Realty 

49 Beale St. 
Woilatton 

472-4330 



J 





Onlui)^ 












ruUISH i CLANCY R E INC 

1440 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

(617)773-7300 

(617)331-3232 

Come in 

and speak to us 

about housing 

or a career 
in Real Estate 





LETS GO with LUKOW 

Let me help with 

Your Real Estate Needs In 1990 




SELLING? • Ask me about my proven 30 day Marketing 
Plan 

• I can save you money wiWi my flexible fees 

• Call me today and let's talk about your plans 

BUYING? • You've picked a great time to buy! 

• Rates are down and prices are right! 

• I know the market from Quincy to Plymouth 

• CALL ME TODAY and Let's Go! 

ra • SEE IWY LISTINGS on Channel 20 -Cable T.V. 

^' ins I will put your home on T.V.I 



RE^RK 



® 



ROBERT LUKOW 

CAPE COD IN QUINCYI 
Just listed - 7 room Cape, 
naw kitchan with Florida 
room, all new windows. 
Only $167,000 
SQUANTUM Antique 
Colonial. 1«,000 sq.lt. lot 
Watervlews, mooring, 
owner anxious. Gardener's 
dream. $239,900 



of the south shore 

■ an 'ndependen! member broker 



ADAMS PROFESSIONAL BLDG. 770-1444 

6 Fort St Quincy - Voice Mall • 24 Hrs. Toll Free 230-5012 



owner's insurance policies are 
Icnown as HO- 1 and HO-2 
HO- 1 is a basic policy which 
may provide coverage against 
1 1 specified perils: fire or 
lightning, windstroms or hail, 
explosion, riots or civil 
commotion, aircraft, vehicles, 
theft, smolce, damage to glass 
or safety glazing material that 
is part of the building, 
volcanic eruption and 
vandalism. 

HO-2 is a broad policy 
which costs 5 to 10 percent 
more than HO- 1, and may 
cover t he same perils as well as 
others: falling objects; weight 
of ice, snow or sleet; 
accidental discharges from 
utilities or household 
appliances; sudden damage 
from artificially-generated 
electrical current; sudden and 
accidental damage of a steam 
or hot water heating system or 
air conditioner; collapse of 
any building or part of a 
building; and freezing of 
household plumbing, air 
conditioning, a heating 
system, household appliances 
or automatic fire protective 
sprinlcler system. 

HO-3, called a "Special 
Policy" covers any and all 
possible perils except fiood. 
earthquake, war and nuclear 
accident and others specified 
in certain individual policies. 
It costs 5 to 10 percent more 
than HO-2 and has become 
the most commonly purchas- 
ed type of homeowner's 
insurance. 

The premiums you pay for 



LORAMAR PRODUCES 
QUINCY 

V.A. - NO $ DOWN 

NEW TO MARKET. Top 
Wollaston location. Spa- 
cious 5-room home in mint 
cond. Garage, walk to T. 
$135,000 

NORTH. New to Market. 
Cozy 6-room home, 3/4 
bedrooms. Oversized lot. 
Short walk to No. Quincy T. 
$139,900 

MERRYMOUTH: 1 floor 
living. 7 rooms. 3 bedrooms. 
Walk up attic. Fully fenced 
yard. $146,900. 

JUST REDUCED. Duplex. 
10-rooms, 5 & 5. Separate 
utilities. 2 drives. Walk toT. 
$204,900 

DIRECT WATERFRONT. 
6-room Colonial. Family 
room with atrium doors to 
large deck. $209,900 

FAXON PARK Area. Large 
2-family. 7/4. All separate 
utilities. All systems 
updated. Slate roof. 
Excellent cond. $214,900 

770-4332 I 



homeowner's insurance arc 
determined by the coverages, 
limits and deductibles you 
select; the construction of the 
house you want to insure; and 
other factors companies use 
to assess risk, including the 
neighborhood's fire-protec- 
tion class, the replacement 
costs for labor and materials 
in the region and the age of the 
house. 



The Insurance Information 
Institute (I.I.I.) says 
homeowners seeking '.insur- 
ance should comparison 
shop. You should obtain 
estimates from at least three 
reputable carriers and review 
the coverages and policy 
limits offered. 



Homeowners also should 
look into ways of cuttingtheir 
insurance bills by raising their 
cash deductibles; inquing 
about discounts for which 
they may qualify; and by 
installing burglar alarms and 
smoke detectors. 




"Yes, you cani" 

Wollaston. Totally re- 
modeled nine room 
Victorian. Foyer with 
French doors to elegant 
fireplaced living room and 
dining room. Designer 
kitchen with garden 
windows. Five large 
bedrooms, two full baths. 
Totally insulated, newer 
plumbing, newer wiring. 
Excellent location. A home 
you'll love to live in. 
$229,000 

Wollaston. Beautiful new 
kitchen with cathedral 
ceilings, skylites; 20x19 
foot fireplaced living room; 
sunny dining room. Three 
bedrooms; 2 full baths. 
Beautiful hideaway office 
.in basement could be 4th 
bedroom. Walk to Wollaston 
T. $179,900 

West. Two single family 
homes on 15120 square 
foot residence B Zoned lot. 
$229,900 

Squantum. Outstanding 
selection on the peninsula 
community. Priced from 
$199,900 to $325,000 

328-9400 



Sfi E OUM LIS I INOS ON 



cflbl* d>. 20 
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PaKC 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1990 




Special Features 



GRUBBY 



By Warren Sattlcr 




IT JUST SO HAPPENED . 




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Star scope X 



WEEK OF: January 18 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Capricorns (January 18-20) are earthy and business oriented; 
Aquarians (January 21-24) are known for creativity and 
humanitarian work. For both signs, the coming year will see 
a mixture of business sense ancT idealism pay large dividends 
in career setting. Romance, meanwhile, accents renewed 
commitments. 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - February 19 

Status is improving thanks to initiatives taken over the past two 
or three months. Relatives return a favor. Friends arc in a sen- 
timental mood and set out to pamper you. 

PISCES - February 20 - March 20 

Week has a musical theme as you find yourself attending con- 
certs or hear a tune from a distant time. Nostalgia is highlighted 
as well-a good week for putting together a photo album. 

ARIES - March 21 • April 20 

Varied events are sprinkled through the week-it may be a good 
time to start a diary. Indeed, writing is a current strength; you 
particularly excel at putting together reports. 

TAURUS - April 21 • May 22 

Cooperation arrives from a most unexpected source. Week is 
generally a good time for burying hatchets and renewing friend- 
ships that may have been put on hold. Spontaneous travel is 
indicated. 

GEMINI - May 23 • June 21 

Thursday-Saturday are favorable for shopping trips-provided 
you know your prices. Decorating ideas are bright but don't 
make any dramatic changes without consulting those who share 
your home. 

CANCER - June 22 - July 22 

Assignments left dangling in late 1989 return for completion; 
don't rush through the finishing touches. For yourself and your 
loved ones, an excellent week to upgrade skills. 

LEO - July 23 - August 22 

Communications snag may result in the delay of an important 

Kroject; this is a good period, however, lo catch up on research, 
elationships become more open thanks to your recent 
initiative. 

VIRGO - August 23 - September 22 

Home life is perking with activity; invitations issued over the 
last while seem to be accepted all at once. News from abroad 
arrives now. Physical fitness should be a priority. 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

Good week to take inventory of family's health and fitness 
needs-and then to act accordingly. Your competitive edge sur- 
faces and leads to improvement of your own standards. 

SCORPIO - October 23 - November 21 

Week produces some effective brainstorming and a major group 
endeavor finally is launched. Home life is quieter-a great week 
for catching up on personal filing and similar activities. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 - December 22 

You're unusually expressive at this time and should consider 
writing poetry or lyrics. Mathematical skills are not as sharp now; 
be sure to double check any chore involving numbers. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 - January 20 

Routine projects suddenly become much more exciting, thanks 
largely to your own brighter outlook. Major purchase comes 
closer lo being a reality; avoid impulsive actions. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

January 18th, actor Aurthur Thomas; 19th, actress Dolly 
Parton; 20th, actress Patricia Neal; 21st, actor Telly Savalas; 
22nd, actor Bill Bixby; 23rd, author William Clark; 24th, singer 
Neil Diamond. 



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16. English 

princess 

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Young female . 

Greek letter ^'■ 

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Thursda>. January 18. 1990 Quincv Sun Page 15 



No. 2 League Scorer 



DeBoer Sparkles In 2 Raider Win s 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Erik DeBoer, 6-5 co- 
captain of the North Quincy 
boys' basketball team, is 
having an outstanding season 
and is the number two scorer 
in the Suburban League with 
an average of over 19 points a 
game. 

Last Friday night DeBoer 
came up with one of the shots 
of the year when he hit on a 
three-pointer from three- 
quarter court at the buzzer to 
give the Raiders a 64-61 
victory over Waltham. 

With its second win of the 
week, North improved to 4-5. 

Ted Stevenson's Raiders 
played at Brookline Tuesday, 
will host Brockton Friday 
night at 7:30 and will be at 
Newton North Tuesday 
afternoon at 3:30. 

"That shot was unbeliev- 
able," said Stevenson. "I got 
to see it on tape and it was 
even better the second time 
around. DeBoer has been 
outstanding all season and is 
one of the top players in the 
league. 

"This was a great win for us. 
We should have a better 
record, our first three losses 
being by two (twice) and three 
points, games we should have 
won. We were having trouble 
in the second half and making 
too many mistakes. I'm 
looking forward to getting 
even for those losses over the 
second half of our schedule." 

DeBoer, who has scored 20 
or more points in nearly every 
game, scored 21 against 
Waltham as North battled 
back from a 1 5-point deficit in 
the third quarter. He took a 
feed from co-captain Jeff 



Calvert on the end line, turned 
and fired. 

Freshman Sean Donovan, 
who has been having an 
excellent season, added 16 
points and tied the game at 5 1 
with two free throws with 41 
seconds left. Angelo Kyranis 
contributed eight points and 
eight rebounds. Another who 
has been playing well all 
season is sophomore 
Desmond Bellot, a great 
jumper who has been a big 
help on the boards. 

Earlier in the week North 
had a big second half to defeat 
Quincy, 78-67, in the cross- 
town rivals' first meeting of 
the year. 

The Raiders, employing a 
swarming, full-court press, 
pulled away from the 
Presidents in the second half 
after holding only a two-point 
lead at the half. 

Bellot scored all 12 of his 
points in the second half, 
complementing DeBoer, who 
had 20 points and seven 
rebounds. 

"We didn't play a good first 
half," said Stevenson. "We 
made some adjustments at 
halftime and used our press 
well. Pressure defense is our 
trademark and we live and die 
by our pressure." 

North had a 13-10 first 
quarter lead and a 29-27 edge 
at the half. 

The Raiders outscored 
Quincy, 29-21, in the third 
quarter to take a 58-48 lead 
into the final session. 

DeBoer had 20 points, 
Bellot 12, Dan McLean 10, 
Dave Cawthorne nine and 
Calvert eight. 



Quincy Trying 

To Put It 
All Together 



The Quincy boys' basket- 
ball team is still fighting hard 
but cannot put it all together 
for a victory and two losses 
last week dropped the 
Presidents' record to 0-10. 

John Franceschini's 
Quincy team will play at 
Wahham Friday night at 7:30 
and will be home to 
Brookline, the Suburban 
League's top team, Tuesday ati 
5 o'clock. 

Last Friday Quincy, as 
usual, stayed in the game most 
of the way but dropped a 66- 
57 decision to another league 
power, Newton North (8-1). 

Mike Scolaro had a big 
night for the Presidents with 
19 points and 10 rebounds 
and Ralph Bevilacqua had 13 
points and four assists. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
had a fine first half but let 



down in the second half and 
lost to North Quincy, 78-67, 
in the rivals' first meeting of 
the season. 

The Presidents played well 
in the first half and trailed by 
only 29-27 at the half 

However, they were 
bothered by North's full-court 
press in the second half as the 
Raiders outscored them, 49- 

40. 

"We were lousy," said 
Franceschini. "Bad shooting 
and breakdowns on the press 
hurt us. We are inexperienced 
and North reacted well." 

E.J. Nordstrom had 
another good game and led 
the attack with 18 points, Joey 
Russell continued his fine 
play with 16. Scolaro added 
11 and Bevilacqua had the 
only three-point goal of the 
game. 



I 



>oo* 





QLINCVS E.J. Nordstrom score, for the Presidents in loss to 
North Quincy as Eric DeBoer (left) and Desmond Bellot of 
North try to stop him. 



BRIAN CURRAN of North Quincy goes up for a shot in last 
week's win over Quincy. Quincy's Mike Norton (3) watches in 
background. 

(Quincy Sun pholot by Tom Gorman) 



Sun Sports 



2 Advance To State Hoop Shoot Finals 



Two Quincy youngsters 
have advanced to the state 
championship in the Elk's 
National "Hoop Shoot" Free 
Throw Contest. Eric 
Zimmerman, a grade 7 
student at Atlantic Middle 
School, and Carolyn 
Williams, a grade 6 student at 
Broad Meadows, were 
crowned champion of the 
Elks Circle District in a 
competition held at Bentley 
college. 

Other Quincy competitors 
scored well at the regional 
competition featuring 
winners from approximately 
20 Elks lodges in greater 
Boston. Matthew McLoughlin 
was a 2nd place winner in the 
8/9 age group making 18 of 
the 25 free throws. He was 
edged by a champion making 
19. Kate Lavery in the 8/9 age 
group Quincy champion was 
tied for third in her category, 
while Todd Sullivan was 4th 
in his 10/11 age category. 

Each youngster had 
qualified to advance to 
Bentley College after 
capturing the City of Quincy 
Championship in a contest 
supervised by the Quincy 
Recreation Department and 
sponsored by the Quincy 



Lodge of Elks, there are more 
than 3.4 million contestants 
nation wide in this activity 
which concludes with a 
National Championship 
being crowned in Market 
Square Arena, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

Over 250 Quincy youngsters 
took part in the competition 
in three age groups for boys 
and girls. 



Zimmerman is in the 12/13 
age category, while Williams 
is in the 10/11 age category. 

Locally Ed Miller, former 
North Quincy High School 
and current Marshfield High 
School coach, is the Hoop 
Shoot director for the Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. Barry J. 
Welch, the Director of 
Recreation for the City of 
Quincy, coordinated the city 



championship and 1st round 
competitions which are 
conducted free of charge to 
participants in the Quincy 
Recreation's after school and 
Saturday winter recreation 
programs. 

Trophies were presented to 
champions and runners up at 
the district championship. 
The state championship will 
be held February 17. 



^co 




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a. 

CO 



MILTON ACADEMY 

SUMMER DAY CAMP 

FOR BOYS AND GIRLS, AGES 6-12 

FEATURING 
SOCCER, LACROSSE, BASKETBALL, 
BASEBALL, SOFTBALL, TENNIS, 
SWIMMING, AND 
Academics Too!! 

mrORMATIONAL OPEN HOUSE, 

THURS., JAN. 25TH 

AT 7:30 IN STOAUS HALL 

FOR MORE INFO CONTACT EITHER 
JEFF BEEDY OR DAVE ROST AT 698-7800 

Milton Academy • 170 Centre Street * Milton, MA 02186 



FOOTBALL 

BASEBALL 

HOCKEY 

SOCCER 

CAMPING 
Canton Hanover I 



Page 16 Quinc> Sun Thursday. Januar> 18. 1990 

• Hockey 

Quincy Still Winless 
But Gets 3rd Tie 



Quincy's hockey team has 
yet to win its first game of the 
season, but the Presidents did 
get their third tie, 4-4, against 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
last Friday to make their 
record 0-6-3. Quincy already 
has one more point than it had 
all last season when it finished 
at 1-18. 

The Presidents met 
Brookline last night 
(Wednesday), will be idle 
Saturday and will be at 
Waltham next Wednesday at 
6 o'clock. 

"A tie is better than a loss, 
but the disappointing part is 
that we lost good leads in two 



of our ties," said Quincy 
coach Bob Sylvia. "In our 
opening game we had a 5-2 
lead late in the game but were 
tied by Maiden and against 
Cambridge we got off to a 4-0 
lead." 

In the Cambridge game 
Scott MacPherson, Paul 
Shine, freshman Mark 
Gilmore and freshman Dave 
Mullen had the Quincy goals. 
Dave Mellyn, Jim Schatzl, 
Mike Bamber, Mullen and 
MacPherson had assists. 

The Presidents held a 3-0 
lead after a period and made it 
4-0 in the second before 
Cambridge battled back and 



scored the tying goal on a 
power rlay with 1:06 left to 
play 

Craig Galligan had 1 5 saves 
in the Quincy goal. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
was bombed by Brockton, 9- 
1, with McPherson scoring 
the goal and Fred Reagan 
assisting. Galligan had 26 
saves as Brockton had 35 
shots on goal. 

John Peterson, one of the 
Suburban League's top 
players, had a big night for 
Brockton with four goals and 
two assists. 

- TOM SULLIVAN 



Slumping Raiders 
Bow To Newton North 



The North Quincy hockey 
team, which won its first five 
games, has been in a slump 
and in its last four games tied 
one and lost three to drop its 
record to 5-3-1 (O-I-l in the 
Suburban League). 

Idle last Saturday, the 
Raiders dropped a 5-2 
decision to Newton North 
earlier in the week. 

North played Waltham last 
night (Wednesday) at 
Watertown, will host 
Brookline Saturday at 7:50 at 
the Youth Arena and will be 
home to Brockton next 
Wednesday at 6:40 at the 
Youth Arena. 



The Raiders had one of the 
top scoring lines in the state in 
Sal Manganaro, Joe Fasano 
and Brian Zimmerman, but 
coach Dave Peters has split 
them up to give the team more 
scoring balance. 

The three had combined for 
an impressive 65 points going 
into last night's Waltham 
game. Manganaro had 18 
goals and nine assists, Fasano 
13 goals and nine assists and 
Zimmerman eight goals and 
eight assists. 

"There is no doubt this 
would be one of the highest 
scoring lines, but I think we 
need more scoring balance 



rather than have that first line 
do the bulk of the scoring," 
Peters said. 

"I feel one of the reasons for 
our slump has been the 
absence of two of our top 
players. With them back, I 
think we will get rolling for 
the rest of the season." 

Fasano scored both goals 
against Newton North with 
Manganaro having an assist. 

"We were only behind, 3-2, 
late in the game but Newton 
added an insurance goal and 
scored the fifth goal into an 
open net," Peters said. 

- TOM SULLIVAN 



Sun Regains First Place 



The Quincv Suii reqained 
first place in the Squirt 
House League by edging 
Johnson Motor Parts, 6-5. 
j David Rowell had two 
goals and Tim Wood, Jeff 
Spear, Chris DiMattia and 
Lucas Chenette one each. 
Dan O'Donnell and Wood 
had assists. Bill Barron 
had a hat trick and Jim 
Hasson and Tim Zaniboni 



a goal each for Johnson. 
Matt Langille had three 
assists, Billy Graney two 
and Hasson one. 

Burgin Plainer topped 
Doran & Horrigan, 7-4, 
sparked by Matt Radzevich's 
hat trick. Tim Sheehan 
had two goals and Robbie 
Winter and Tom Sullivan 
one each. Winter had four 
assists. Sheehan and 



Radzevich two apiece and 
Joe Bracken one. Jason 
Snaith, John Masone, 
John Ryan and Dennis 
alien scored for Doran and 
Allen, Robbie Pirelli and 
Masone had assists. 

The standings: Quincy 
Sun. 6-3-3; Johnson Motor, 
7-5-0; Doran & Horrigan, 
5-4-3; Burgin Platner, 3-9-0. 



Lydon Blanks Hennessy, 3-0 



Lydon-Russell blanked 
Rogan Hennessy, 3-0, in 
Mite House League action. 

Brian Nolan, Matt Hill 
and Mike Sullivan had the 
goals and Nolan and 
Chris Griffin had assists. 
Goalie John Barron recorded 
the shutout. 

Matt O'Connell's hat 
trick led the Paul Harold 



Club to a 5-3 win over 
Balducci's. Matt Gibbons 
and Derek McTomney had 
the other goals. Nick 
Pizziferri had two assists 
and Gibbons and Brian 
Correia one each. Paul 
Markarian had all three 
Balducci's goals and Mike 
Powers, Jesse Winter. 
Chad Fitzpatrick and Kevin 
Cellucci had assists. 



Purdy's Ice Cream and 
N.V. Survey tied, 3-3. 
Didier Alther had two 
goals and Mark Foster one 
for Purdy's and Tom 
Sullivan and Chris Cullen 
had assists. Jim Sullivan, 
Jim Parisi and Jacob 
Fleming scored for Survey. 
Jim Sullivan had two 
assists and John Sullivan 
one. 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORMIIHH 
FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



^vi.±xi.car 






1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME — 
STREET 
CITY 



-STATE- 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $11.00 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $12.00 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $15.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



I 



Quincy Freshmen 
Win 4 Straight 



The Quincy High boys' 
freshman basketball team, 
coached by Mike Draicchio, 
lost its first five games but all 
were close with the excep- 
tion of that with Braintree, 
unbeaten at the time, but 
has bounced back to win 
its last four games, inc- 
luding handing Braintree 
its first loss. 

The four-game win streak 
started with a 53-42 win 
over B.C. High, led by 
Matt Dwyer's 13 points. 

The young Presidents then 
defeated North Quincy, 61- 
45, with Erik MacFarlane 
scoring 18 points. Also 
playing well were Capt. 
Robbie Kane, Mike, 
Kavanaugh, Noel DiBona 
and Dwyer. Draicchio was 



able to use all is players 
in this game. 

Quincy topped Newton 
North, 48-38, having to go 
to the bench early because 
of foul trouble. Kenny Dow- 
ney had eight points to 
spark a second quarter sp- 
urt that put Quincy ahead 
to stay. Dwyer led the 
attack with 16 points. 

In its latest game Quincy 
avenged its earlier loss to 
Braintree with a 49-46 vic- 
tory, featuring strong de- 
fense and an impressive 
offense led by Kane with 

20 points. DiBona had 12 
points. 

"It was nice to defeat 
a tough B.C. High team 
and undefeated Braintree," 
said Draicchio. "The team 



has worked hard every 
day at practice and the 
results arc showing." 

The roster includes 
Chris Bistany, Jason 
Crosby, DiBona, Downey, 
Dwyer. David Flaherty, 
Kane, Kavanaugh, Kenney, 
MacFarlane, Mark Miner, 
Shahcen, Pat Shea, Mike 
Sugruc, Rob Wilbosky and 
Mike Wilson. 

The Quincy freshmen 
will be at Waltham Friday. 

"I want to thank varsity 
coach John Franceschini, 
assistant coach Ray Papilc, 
youth coordinator Bub 
Cochrane and assistant 
coordinator Ron Mariano 
for all their help with our 
freshmen program," said 
Draicchio. 

- TOM SULLIVAN 



UCT, Keohane's Tie 



UCT holds a two-point 
lead in the Pee Wee House 
League after tying 
Keohane's, 3-3. 

Sean McDonald had two 
goals and Mike McKinnon 
one for UCT and Brendan 
Mulcahy and McDonald had 
assists. Dave Doherty, Scott 



MacPherson and Jimmy 
Gallagher scored for 
Keohane's and Brendan 
O'Brien and Tom Hawes 
had assists. 

Colonial Federal blanked 
Bcrsani Brothers, 4-0, as 
Jim Keegan had two goals 
and Ronnie McGann and 



J.J. Borden one each. 
Kccgan, Shawn McTomney 
and Dan Boylen had as- 
sists. Goalie Mark Smith 
recorded the shutout. 

The standings: UCT, 4- 
2-6 Colonial Federal, 5-5-2; 
Bcrsani, 4-4-4; Keohane's, 
4-6-2. 



Quincy's Squirt B hockey 
team, sponsored by Quincy 
Cablesystems, won three 
games last weekend, a state 
playdown game and two 
Greater Boston League 
games. 

After a fine first half of the 
season, the team has been 
moved up to the Open 
Division. 

In the state playdown game 
Quincy defeated Walpole, 7- 
2, as Matt Langille and 
Robbie Winter scored two 



Squirt B's Win 3 



goais eacn. David Rowell, 
Jason Snaith and Matt 

Radzevich had a goal apiece. 
Brian Degan had two assists 
and Billy Graney, Jimmy 

Casinelli, Chris DiMattia, 
Bruce Stenberg and Winter 
one each. 

In the GBL Quincy 
walloped Hyde Park, 9-3, led 
by Winter with four goals and 
Jeff Coleman with a hat trick. 
Radzevich and Degan had the 
other goals and Coleman, 



Casinelli, Radzevich, Degan, 
Snaith, Rowell and Stenberg 
had assists. 

In another league game 
Quincy bombed Somerville, 
10-2, as Graney, Radzevich, 
Jimmy Hasson and Winter 
had two goals apiece. 
Coleman and Stenberg had a 
goal each. Langille and 
Graney had two assists apiece 
and Coleman, Hasson, 
Winter, Degan and Brad 
Macauley one apiece. 



Jamboree Roundup 



Rogan Hennessy Mite Champion 



Rogan Hennessy won the 
Mite House League jamboree 
with a 2-1 victory over the 
Paul Harold Club in the 
finals. 

Ryan Murray scored the 
winning goal in overtime and 

Chris Haidul had the other 
Rogan Hennessy goal. Bob 

Harvey, Brian Quinn and 
Sean Garvey had assists. 



Derek McTomney scored for 
Harold with Sean Slattery 
assisting. 

In the semifinals Rogan 
Hennessy topped Balducci's, 
3-1, with Haidul scoring twice 

and Jim Cashings once. 
Murray and Haidul had 
assists. Shane Kabilian scored 

for Balducci's and Jeff 
Brophy assisted. 



Harold eliminated N.V. 
Survey, 6-2, led by Nick 
Pizziferri's hat trick. 
McTomney had two goals 
and Correia one. John Wall 
had two assists and Matt 
Gibbons, Correia, Brian 
Ehrlichand Didier Alther one 
each. Ryan Barrett and 
Jimmy Sullivan scored for 
Survey and Steve Ford and 
Shawn Manning had assists. 



Burgin Platner Squirt Winner 



Burgin Platner is in the 
Squirt House League cellar, 
but put it all together to win 
the Squirt House League 
jamboree with a 4-3 victory 
over Doran & Horrigan in the 
finals. 



Justin Doty scored the 
winning goal in double 

overtime. Glenn Chase, 
Robbie Winter and Joe 

Bracken had the other goals. 
Winter, Doty, Dan Hughes 



and Jim Casinelli had assists. 

Jason Snaith, Dennis Allen 

and Paul Princiotto had the 

Doran goals with assists for 

Allen, Brian Degan and 
Robbie Pirelli. 



Bersani Wins Pee Wee Title 



Bersani Brothers defeated 
Keohane's, 4-2, to win the Pee 
Wee House jamboree. 

Jason Healy had two goals 



and Pat Tevenan and Steve 
Barrett one apiece. Jamie 
Boire had two assists and 
Tevenan and Ken Burke one 



Quincy Sun 

Route Available 

in Quincy Point 

Lawn Ave., Hanna St. 

Washington Court, Cherry SI. 

Avalone Avenue area 

Call 471-3100 



each. Brendan O'Brien scored 
both Keohane's goals with 
assists for Jimmy Gallagher 
and Jenna Nolan. 



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Thursday, January 18. 1990 Quincy Sun Pa{c 17 



Basketball 



North Tops 
Quincy, Bows 
To Waltham 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team, after 
defeating Quincy for the 
second time, turned the ball 
over 10 times in the second 
quarter and lost to Waltham, 
44-28, last Friday, dropping 
its record to 6-3. 

The North girls played at 
Brookline Tuesday, will play 
at undefeated Brockton 
Friday night at 7:30 and will 
host Newton North Tuesday 
at 5 o'clock. 

The 10 second quarter 
turnovers led to an 18-7 run 
for Waltham and the North 
girls were unable to make up 
the deficit. 

Kerry Tolson led the North 
offensive with 10 points. 

Earlier in the week North 
edged a spirited Quincy club, 
34-30, in a defensive battle 
which saw the North girls 
holding Quincy to one point 
in the second quarter as thpv 



took a 14-7 halftime lead. 

Tara Miles led the North 
with 13 points, including two 
three-pointers and scored 
nine of her points in the 
second half. Kerry Tolson 
chipped in with eight points. 

The North girls widened its 
halftime lead to 21-9 when 
Tricia Hughes converted an 
offensive rebound and Miles 
added a basket. 

Miles' second three-pointer 
gave North a 29-18 lead with 
5:07 to play. Quincy cut the 
gap to 32-27 with 3:05 
remaining and North needed 
free throws by Miles and Kara 
Sullivan to clinch the win. 

This was the first Suburban 
League game between the 
cross-town rivals. The North 
girls had defeated Quincy in 
the consolation game of the 
Christmas Tournament at 
Weymouth South. 



Quincy Snaps 
Losing Streak 



The Quincy girls' basket- 
ball team snapped a six-game 
losing streak last Friday night 
when it exploded for a 58-41 
victory over Newton North, 
improving its record to 2-8. 

Doug MacFarlane's 
Quincy team will be home to 
Waltham Friday at 5 o'clock 
and will play at Brookline 
Tuesday, also at 5. 

"We have been playing 
better than our record 
indicates and were due for a 
game like this," said 
MacFarlane, whose team has 
been in most games most of 
the way. "Our full-court zone 
press worked well in this game 
and we built up a big early 
lead, something we haven't 
been able to do in the past." 

Quincy rolled to a 17-1 lead 
in the first quarter and never 
looked back. 

Junior Amy Baker paced 
the Quincy girls with 14 
points, six steals and seven 
rebounds. Melanie Sullivan 
had eight points and eight 
rebounds. 

Newton North cut Quincy's 
lead to 27-17 before Quincy 
went on a 20-10 run in the 
third quarter. 



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Quincy 
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Earlier in the week Quincy 
suffered a nightmarish second 
quarter when it scored only 
one point as it lost for the 
second time to North Quincy, 
34-30. 

It was the first Suburban 
League meeting between the 
rivals. North had defeated 
Quincy in the consolation 
game of the Christmas 
Tournament at Weymouth 
South. 

Quincy trailed North, 14-7, 
at the half after its awful 
second quarter. Quincy was 
behind, 23-17, after three 
quarters as it outscored 
North, 23-20, in the last two 
quarters. 

In the third quarter Quincy 
went on an 8-2 run to move 
within six points as Baker and 
Julie McCloskey had key 
baskets. 

With North leading, 29-18 
and 5:07 left to play, Baker hit 
on a three-pointer, one of her 
two, and Erin Doherty added 
a free throw to make it 32-27. 
Foul shots by North's Tara 
Miles and Kara Sullivan 
clinched the win. 

- TOM SULLIVAN 





NORTH QUINCY'S Christine Salton watches as her shot 
drops in against Quincy as Quincy's Kim IVIarsden (15) and 
Chris Barrett defend. 



QUINCY'S Julie McCloskey, left, shoots over North 
Quincy's Joanna Rugnetti in last week's loss to North. 

(Quincy Sun phoiot by Tom Gorman^ 



Quincy Wrestlers Romp 



The Quincy wrestling team 
continued to roll and took 
part in three multi-team 
tournaments during the 
past three weekends. 

The Presidents last week- 
end won the Westside In- 
vitational. 

Quincy also defeated 
Maiden, 34-31, and 
Brookline, 45-20, to improve 
to 8-1 overall and 4-0 in 
the Suburban League. 
The Maiden meet came down 
to the heavyweight match 
as Quincy was trailing, 
31-30. Tom Burton faced 
Maiden's unbeaten Dan 
Ford, who outweighed him 



by 40 pounds. Burton, a 
junior, dominated the third 
period to win, 14-5, and 
improve his record to 5-1. 

In the Brookline meet 
sophomore Greg Souza 
(6-1), senior Al Souza, who 
won his 25th straight dual 
meet match, senior Tom 
Fratolillo (5-2), Bob Stanton 
(4-1) and Ally Sleiman 
(5-4) won their matches and 
Dave Cahill (6-2-1) tied 
his opponent. 

Quincy took part in the 
42-team Lowell tournament 
and placed in the top 20 
teams. Burgess placed 
third at 171 pounds and 



Women's Softball 
League Seeks Teams 



The Quincy Women's 
Softball League is looking for 
A, B and C division teams to 
play from May through 
August. Those interested in 
entering teams are asked to 
call Terry at 774-3151 or 
Laurie at 337-4411 days or 
Ginny at 328-0620 after 5 p.m. 

Any Quincv business 



wishing to sponsor a team in 
the league or girls 18 and over 
interested in playing should 
call Laurie or Ginny. 

A USSSA umpire clinic 
will be held Jan. 23 and 25 
from 7 to 9:30 p.m. 
Additional information can 
be had by calling Ginny. 



North Football Banquet 



The annual North Quincy 
High Football Boosters 
awards banquet will be held 
Sunday, Feb. 4, at 4 o'clock at 
the Sons of Italy Hall, Quarry 



Street. 

Tickets should be pur- 
chased by Saturday. Ticket 
chairman is Bill Earley, who 
can be reached at 471-4642. 




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Matt Fratolillo (103), Greg 
Souza (125) and Brian 
Gannon (135) all wrestled 
well. 

The Seaford tournament in 
Sanford, Me., featured 14 
teams from all over New 
England and Quincy placed 
fifth. 

Al Souza won at 130 
pounds. Burgess placed 
second, Greg Souza and 
Gannon were third. Matt 
Fratolillo fourth and sleman 
sixth. 

The Westside Invitational 
featured 12 teams, mostly 
from Western Mass. Among 
the teams were Agawam, 



Putnan, Central, Natick, 
Stoughton and runnerup 
West Springfield. 

Quincy placed five in the 
finals as the Souza 
Brothers won at 130 and 
125 pounds, Matt Fratolillo 
was second at 103, Burgess 
second at 171 and Co-Capt. 
Tony Madden second in 
the heavyweight class. 

Quincy faces its tough- 
ist challenge of the sea- 
son Saturday when it 
faces Brockton, Lowell and 
Stoughton at Brockton. The 
Quincy-Brockton meet 
could decide the Suburban 
League title. 



COIMAMS' 



Sports 
Stumpers 

Sports Quiz 

by Larry Duncan 



1. Name the last American League baseball player to 
win a home run title for three consecutive years. 

2. Name the last National League baseball player to win 
a home run title for seven consecutive years. 

3. Where did the Baltimore Orioles play prior to 1954? 

4. Name the last Ivy League school to win an NCAA 
Hockey Championship. 

5. Name all seven teguns UCLA defeated during their 
seven-year reign (1967-73) as NCAA basketball champ. 

6. What is the name of the NCAA basketball award 
announced annually for the nation's outstanding player? 

7. Name two ABA teams that captured two champion- 
ships. 

8. Name the last player from the University of Texas to 
capture a Heisman Trophy. 

9. What was the team name of the ABA franchise 
Carolina? 

10. What was the team name of the ABA franchise 
Miami? 



Sports Quiz Answers 



1. Harmon Killebrew of Minnesota (1962-64); 2. Ralph 
Kiner of Pittsburgh (1946-52); 3. In St. Louis as the 
Browns; 4. Cornell in 1970; 5. Dayton, North Carolina, 
Purdue, Jacksonville, Villanova, Florida State and Mem- 
phis State; 6. John K. Wooden Award: 7 Indiana Pacers in 
1972 and 197;^ and New York Nets m 1974 and 1976; 8. Earl 
Campbell in 1977; 9. Cougars; 10 F'loridians 

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Page II Quincy Sun Thursday, January l>, 1940 

Peter E. Orio, 37 



Owned Tile 

A funeral Mass for Peter E. 
Orio, 37, of Houghs Neck, 
was celebrated Jan. 13 at 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. Burial was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Orio, owner of Quincy 
Tile Setter for five years, died 
Jan. 10 at home. 



Setting Firm 

He was born in Boston and 
lived in Quincy 30 years. 

He is survived by his 
mother, Eleanor (Day) Orio, 
and a brother, Dennis J. Orio 
of New Jersey. He was the son 
of the late Italo Orio. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St. 



Mary H. MacKinnon, 92 

Former Cosmetics Consultant 



A funeal Mass for Mary H. 
MacKinnon, 92, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 15 at St. 
Ann's Churci;. Burial was in 
Holy Cross Cemetery, 
Maiden. 

Miss MacKinnon, a former 
cosmetics consultant for 
Elizabeth Arden Cosmetics in 
Boston, died Jan. 9 at Quincy 
Hospital. 



She lived in Dorchester and 
in Quincy 32 years. 

She was the daughter of the 
late Hugh and Annie (Currie) 
MacKinnon and the sister of 
the late Katherine T. 
MacKinnon. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 786 Hancock St. 



Rose M. Prizio 



A funeral Mass for Rose M. 
(DeAngelis) Prizio of Quincy 
was celebrated Jan. 12 at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel 
Church, Merrymount. Burial 
was in St. Michael's 
Cemetery. 

Mrs. Prizio, a machine 
operator for French Shriner 
Urner Co. in Boston for 30 
years, died Jan. 10 at home. 

She was born in Boston and 
lived in Quincy 25 years. 

Wife of the late John T. 



Prizio, she is survived by three 
sisters, Mary DeAngelis and 
Carmella "Billie" Zappi, both 
of Quincy, and Johanna 
Perrow of Braintree; two 
nieces, Josephine Appel and 
Joan Perrow both of Quincy; 
and several grandnieces and 
grandnephews. She was the 
sister of the late Joseph 
DeAngelis. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 







A THOOGHT FOR THE WEEK 

Many people have a problem 
which keeps them from being 
effective In their daily lives. 

What Is it? It Is simply that they 
have difficulty In taking and living 
life one day at a time. 

How many people do you know 

who are constantly worrying and 

D Scott Deware an^ioui about tomorrow? They 

spend a lot of time planning what they are going to do 

tomorrow and when that day comes, they seem to be in 

the same predicament. Worrying about tomorrow. 

How many people do you know who live In the past? 
They reminisce about the good old days. They 
comment, "The past is t>est." Then there are those who 
forget the good old days and only recall the past hurts, 
guilts and wrongs. For them the past seems to hang 
over theffl, casting a pall over each day. 

Perhaps the saddest thing about not living in the 
present is that one could live a whole lifetime and 
completely miss life. In Psalms 118:24, the Psalmist 
wrote, "This is the day which the Lord has made; let us 
rejoice arid be glad In IL" 

There .ire enough trouliles to t>e concerned about 
today wHhout worrying about yesterday or tomorrow. 
Live today ahd take care of today's proMems today. It 
can have a profound effect upon your life ... 

Deware Funerai Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

Tel: 472-1137 

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Obituaries 

Dr. John T. Saunders, 96 

Retired Dentist, 

seball Player 

Society, as well as a member 
of the Quincy Elks, Lions, and 
American Legion, and the St. 
Apoionia Guild. 

He was born in Dudley and 
attended schools in both 
Dudley and Webster. In his 
high school days he 
participated in track and field 
and tennis. 

He was a 1918 graduate of 
Tuft Dental School. 

Dr. Saunders was a Quincy 
resident for 65 years. 

Husband of the late Hester 
C. (Harking) Saunders, he is 
survived by three son, J. 
Thomas Saunders of Canton, 
Robert H. Saunders of 
Duxbury and Daniel R. 
Saunders of Quincy; two 
daughters, Anne M. Fitzgerald 
of Quincy and Eileen H. 
Buckley of Hingham; 19 
grandchildren and five great 
grandchildren. 



Former Star Ba 

A funeral Mass for Dr. 
John T. Saunders, 96, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 
13 at St. John's Church, 44 
School St. Burial was in St. 
Mary's Cemetery. 

Dr. Saunders, a retired 
dentist and a former Ail- 
American baseball player, 
died Jan. 11 at the John 
Adams Nursing Home. 

Dr. Saunders practiced 
dentistry for 67 years. 

He won baseball scholar- 
ships to Holy Cross College 
and to Tufts Dental School. 

He owned the Nashua 
Dodgers in the old New 
England League for a time. 
Financial support came from 
passing the hat and whatever 
other fund-raising he could 
manage. 

During World War I he 
served in the Army Dental 
Corps and for a time was 
assigned to the French Army 
as a dental surgeon. He was 
also the camp dental surgeon 
for a military police unit in 
Paris. 

He was a member of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society 
and the Northeastern Dental 



Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Funeral Home for Funerals, I 
Independence Ave. 

Donations may be made to 
St. John's Building Fund, 44 
School St., Quincy 02169. 



Louis G. Tornberg, Sr., 61 



A funeral service for Louis 
G. Tornberg Sr., 61, of 
Quincy, a former bar manager 
at the Bryan VFW Post in 
Quincy and an Army veteran 
of the Korean War, was held 
Jan. 12 at the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 
Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Mr. Tornberg died Jan. 9 at 
Carney Hospital in Dorchester 
after a long illness. 

Mr. Tornberg served as a 
sergeant during the Korean 
War. 

He was also a carpenter in 
the South Shore area. 

He was a member of the 
Bryan VFW Post. 

Mr. Tornberg was born in 
Boston, where he lived until 



The Florist 

389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

328-3959 

sine* 1900 



he moved to Quincy 20 years 
ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Thelma (Ricketson) Tornberg; 
three sons, Louis G. Tornberg 
Jr., William Tornberg and 
Carl Tornberg, all of Quincy; 
three daughters. Donna Cobb 
of Abington, Patricia Olson 
of Weymouth and Susan 
Tornberg of Quincy; four 
brothers, Henry E. Fornberg 
of Jamaica Plain, James J. 
Tornberg of New York, 
Charles B. Tornberg of 
Florida and Richard F. 
Tornberg of Worcester; six 
sisters, Eleanor O'Donnell of 
Plympton, Ruth St. Charles 
of Florida, Dorothy Dorsey 
of Jamaica Plain, Signe 
Quiosenberry of California, 
Martha Blaxland of Springfield; 
and Leah E. Snow of 
Waltham; and five grand- 
children. 



Lily Shu-Li Wu, 52 

Bank Analyst, 
Taught Chinese At College 



A memorial service for Lily 
Shu-li (Yang) Wu. 52, of 
Quincy and Fairfield, Conn., 
was held Jan. 13 in the 
Appleton Chapel of Memorial 
Church at Harvard University. 

Mrs. Wu, an analyst for 
State Street Bank, Boston, 
and a university teacher of 
Chinese, died at home Jan. 5 
of cardiac arrest. 

Mrs. Wu was a former 
employee of Gaines Foods, 
White Plains, N.Y.. 
Summagraphics in Fairfield, 
and Emerson Research in 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

She taught Chinese at Yale 
University, University of 
Pennsylvania, Antioch 
College, Wittenburg University 
and the University of 
Bridgeport. 

Mrs. Wu was born in 
Beijing, China, and moved to 



the United States in 1948 with 
her parents. 

A graduate of Cambridge 
High and Latin School, she 
received a bachelor of arts 
degree from Radcliffe College 
in 1961 and a master of arts 
degree from Harvard 
University in 1962. 

She is survived by her 
husband. Dr. Wei-ping Wu of 
Fairfield; two sons, George 
Wu of Cambridge and Frank 
Wu of Madison, Wis.; her 
parents. Dr. and Mrs. Lien- 
sheng Yang of Arhngton; two 
brothers, Daosheng Yang of 
Beijing and Thomas Yang of 
Dorchester; and a sister, 
Zhongping Jiang of Beijing. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Diabetes 
Association, 190 N. Main St., 
Natick 01760. 



Elizabeth Cusenza, 70 

Member American Legion Auxiliary 



A funeral Mass for 
Elizabeth (Cecchini) Cusenza, 
70, of Quincy, a member of 
the Thomas J. Roberts 
Legion Auxiliary, West 
Roxbury, for 35 years, was 
celebrated Jan. 9 at St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mrs. Cusenza died Jan. 6 at 
Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston after a 
long illness. 

Born and raised in Boston, 
she lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 12 years 
ago. 

She and her husband, 
Salvatore Cusenza, observed 
their 50th wedding anniver- 



sary last year. 

She is also survived by three 
daughters, Joan Bunker of 
Quincy, Cheryl Kennedy of 
Scituate and Lisa Eddy of 
Randolph; three sisters. Rose 
Lopez of Florida, and Connie 
DeChellis and Nellie 
Tartaglini, both of California; 
and six grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home. 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society, 
247 Commonwealth Ave.. 
Boston. Ma. 02116. 



Angelo M. Simonetti, 87 



A funeral Mass for Angelo 
M. Simonetti, 87, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 13 at St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 
Burial was in the New Cavalry 
Cemetery, West Roxbury. 

Mr. Simonetti, a plumber 
with Boston Union Local 12 
for 65 years and founder of 
the Marconi Club of 
Roxbury, died Jan. 10 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

Mr. Simonetti was born in 
Italv and lived in Roxburv 



before moving to Quincy 36 
years ago. 

The husband of the late 
Rose (Borsani) Simonetti, he 
is survived by a son and 
daughter-in-law, Robert M. 
and Giuliana (Falcioni) 
Simonetti of Quincy. He was 
the brother of the late Mario 
Simonetti. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 



Gertrude R. Kane, 94 



A funeral Mass for 
Gertrude R. (McQuade) 




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Kane, 94, a resident of Quincy 
for eight years, was celebrated 
Jan. 1 1 at St. Mary's Church. 
Burial was on Jan. 12 in 
Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, 
Queens, N.Y. Mrs. Kane died 
-Ian. 10 at Carney Hospital. 

Mrs. Kane was born in New 
York City. 

Wife of the late John J. 
Kane, she is survived by a 
daughter-in-law, Carol Kane 
of Quincy; and two 
grandchildren, John Kane of 
Boston and Capt. Veronica 
Nemmers of Omaha. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens, and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 



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William J. Verner Babcock 



Ea8tern Nazarene College Professor 

A funeral service for 
William J. Verner Babcock, 
77, of Quincy, former 
chairman of the biology 
department at Eastern 



Na/arene College in 
Wollaston, was held Jan. 1 1 at 
the Wollaston Church of the 
Nazarene, East Elm Ave. 
Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Professor Babcock, who 
was affiliated with Eastern 
Nazarene for 45 years, was a 
pioneer in the environmental 
movement and a man who 
dedicated much of his life to 
students and to the Boy 
Scouts of America, died Jan. 
8. 

During many of his years as 
a teacher and department 
head at ENC, Professor 
Babcock was responsible for 
landscaping and grounds at 
the college. 

Professor Babcock did 
extensive scientific research in 
the Blue Hill Reservation in 
Canton and Milton, east to 
Wollaston Beach. He had 
hoped to set up a natural 
science center on school 
property near the Black's 
Creek marshes in Quincy for 
study of plants and animals 
natural in all areas from the 
mountains to the sea. 

An Eagle Scout himself, he 
was awarded the Silver 
Beaver and the International 
Order of the Wood Badge. 



Mildred Whitaker, 91 

Member Of First Parish Church 



A funeral service for 
Mildred (ElmendorO Whit- 
aker, 91, of Quincy, A 
member of United First 
Parish Church, was conduc- 
ted Jan. 9 at the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 Hancock 
St., Wollaston, by the Rev. 
Sheldon Bennett. 

Mrs. Whitaker died Jan. 6 
at the William B. Rice 
Eventide Home. 

She was active in several 
groups at the church for many 
years. 



in 



and educated 
she lived in Quincy 



Born 
Boston, 
since 1925. 

Wife of the late Francis 
Whitaker, she is survived by a 
son. Dr. Francis. M. 
Whitaker of Marion, Ohio; 
and a cousin, Irving Ruggles 
of Reading. She was the 
daughter of the late Myron 
and Frances (Barton) 
Elmendorf 

Burial was in Needham 
Cemetery. Needham. 



Hilma N. Johnson, 92 



A funeral service for Hilma 
N. (Anderson) Johnson, 92, 
of Quincy, was conducted 
Jan. II at Hamel, Wickens, 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St., by the Rev. 
Alicia Corea of Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church. 
Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Mrs. Johnson, a native of 



Halmstad, Sweden, died Jan. 
8 at Quincy Hospital. 

She lived in Boston before 
moving to Quincy 50 years 
ago. Wife of the late John A. 
Johnson, she is survived by 
two sons, Harry Johnson of 
East Sandwich and Albert 
Johnson of Tampa, Fla.; and 
14 grandchildren and 10 
great-grandchildren. 



Philip Dwyer, 87 



Philip Dwyer, 87, of 
Quincy, died Jan. I in Quincy 
Hospital. 

He is survived by a 
daughter, Carole Farricker of 
Woodbridge, N.J. 

Agnes Pieroni 

A fimeral Mass for Agnes 
M.(Dumais) Pieroni of 
Quincy was celebrated Jan. 10 
at St. Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Pieroni died Jan. 6. 

Wife of late Ansel K. 
Pieroni, she is survived by two 
sons, Joseph Pieroni of 
Newport, R.I., and Dr. 
Robert Pieroni of Tus- 
caloosa, Ala,; a daughter, 
Eleanor Walsh of Symsbury, 
Conn.; and eight grand 
children. She was the sister of 
the late Elizabeth O'Rourke. 



The funeral service 
burial were private. 



and 



Mary T. McMahon, 80 

Gold Star Mother 



For many years, he was a 
Scout leader and member of 
the Quincy Boy Scout 
Council. He was involved in 
training Boy Scout leaders. 

When he retired from ENC 
in 1978 he was named 
professor emeritus and a 
doctor of science. 

He was listed in the Who's 
Who in the East in American 
Men of Science, Who's Who 
in American Education in 
Biology and Leaders in 
American Science. 

He was born in Ontario, 
Canada, and lived in 
Wilmington, N.Y., before 
attending Eastern Nazarene 
College in Quincy. He 
received a bachelor's degree at 
ENC and a master's degree at 
Boston University. 

Professor Babcock is 
survived by his wife, 
Geraldine (Rossier) Babcock; 
another son, Merrill Pierce of 
Tennessee; two daughters, 
Connie B. Lineman of Quincy 
and Mildred Feici of Quincy; 
a brother, Kenneth Babcock 
of Florida; four sisters, Ruth 
Taylor, Orma Preston, Helen 
Smith, and Arlie Lamanna, 
all of New York, and Wilma 
Shaddy of Texas; his wife's 
mother, Beatrice E. Rossier of 
Weymouth; and seven 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 



Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St., Quincy. 



A funeral Mass for Mary T 
(Carter) McMahon, 80, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 
1 1 at St. John the Baptist 
Church, 44 School St. Burial 
was in Blue Hill Cemetery, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. McMahon, a Gold 
Star Mother, died Jan. 7 in 
Florida. 

Mrs. McMahon was born 
in Boston and lived in 
Dorchester before moving to 
Quincy 12 years ago. 

Wife of the late Arthur 
McMahon, she is survived by 
a son, Richard A. McMahon, 
of Dorchester; two daughters. 



Beverly A. Heeney of Quincy 
and Rita A. Grogan of 
Florida; a brother, James 
Carter of Braintree; two 
sisters, Agnes Brennan and 
Frances Casey, both of 
Foxboro; and eight grand- 
children. She was the mother 
of the late Frederick A. 
McMahon and sister of the 
late Robert Carter, John 
Carter, Harold Carter, 
Margaret Garrigan and 
Catherine Sellon. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Robert Fleming, Sr., 82 



A funeral service for 
Robert Fleming Sr., 82, of 
Quincy, was conducted Jan. 
1 1 at Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. Burial was in 
Pine Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Fleming, a retired 
laborer for Howard Johnson's, 
died Jan. 8 at John Adams 
Nursing Home after a long 
illness. 

He retired from Howard 
Johnson's when he was 65. 

Mr. Fleming was a meat 
cutter in his native Scotland 
before coming to the United 
States in 1956. 



He was a life member of the 
Masonic Lodge of St. Barcan 
in Scotland. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Antoinette (Gattens) Fleming; 
a son, Robert Fleming Jr.; 
and a daughter, Aileen Lyons, 
all of Quincy; and three 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made to 
the activities department of 
John Adams Nursing Home, 
211 Franklin St., Quincy 
02169. 



Antoinette Kasianowicz, 65 

Was Hairdresser 



A funeral Mass for 
Antoinette (Cardella) 
Kasianowicz, 65, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 1 1 at St. 
John's Church. Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial Park, 
Canton. 

Mrs. Kasianowicz, a 
hairdresser, died Jan. 8 at 
New England Deaconess 
Hospital, Boston. 

Mrs. Kasianowicz was born 
in Boston and lived there until 
moving to Quincy 36 years 
ago. 

*Jhp is survived bv her 



husband, John E. Kasianowicz; 
a son, John J. Kasianowicz of 
Chevy Chase, Md., two 
daughters. Donna M. Jellison 
of Quincy and Joanne 
Winkler of Stoughton; her 
parents, Alberto DiBlasi and 
Maria (Berenado) Cardella of 
Stoughton and Albert DiBlasi 
of Avon; a sister, Concetta 
Sabitini of Quincy; and six 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Lydia E. Raiche, 87 



A funeral Mass for Lydia E. 
(Brogioli) Raiche, 87, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Jan. 
1 1 at St. Francis of Assisi 
Church, Braintree. Burial was 
in Blue Hill Cemetery, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Raiche, a former 
employee at the Quincy Point 
Junior High School cafeteria, 
died Jan. 8 at Quincy 
Hospital. 

Mrs. Raiche was born in 
and was a lifelong resident of 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Leon E. 
Raiche, she is survived by a 
son, Leon E. Raiche Jr. of 
Norwell; a daughter, Pearl E. 
Kincaid of Braintree; a sister, 
Janet Domaschenz of Key 
West, Fla., four grandchildren, 
and four great-grandchildren. 

Donations may be made to 



St. Joseph's Church Building 
Fund, 556 Washington St., 
Quincy 02169. 



QUINCY 

HEARING AID 

DISP. 



Burial was 
Cemetery. 



in St. Mary's 



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Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 



BOBKARAS KEN KARAS 
Certified Hearing Aid 

Specialists 

Now located across 

from Woolwortht 

and Remlck's at 

1536 Hancock St. 

formerly located at 
1246 Hancock SI. 

Mon-Fri 9 to S, Sat 9 to 12 

HEARING AID 
"KNOW HOW" 

KNOW: He accepts Medicaid 
and all Insurance carriers as 
payment In full. 

KNOW: He gives 30 day free 
trials to insure your satisfaction, 
witfi no cfiarge for fittings or 
molds. 

KNOW: A salesman will not 
knock on your door uninvited by 
you, and wfiere would he be for 
follow-up service. 

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follow-up service for tfie life of 
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CALL NOW FOR APPOINTI^ENT 

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WE MAKE HOME VISITS 
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Thursday, Januar> 18,1990 Quincy Sun Paf>r 19 

Paul G. Landers, 56 

Transportation Union President 



A funeral Mass for Paul G. 
Landers, 56, of Qu'ncy, was 
celebrated Jan. 1 1 at Most 
Precious Blood Church, Hyde 
Park. Burial was in Fairview 
Cemetery, Hyde Park. 

Mr. Landers, a locomotive 
engineer for Amtrack since 
1955 and president of United 
Transportation Union Local 
14, died Jan. 7 after being 
stricken with a heart attack. 

Mr. Landers was a union 
committee chairman, execu- 
tive secretary of the State 
Legislative Board, and 
chairman of the board of 
directors for the United 



Industrial Federal Credit 
Union of Boston. 

He was born and educated 
in Hyde Park. 

Mr. Landers was an Army 
veteran of the Korean War. 

He is survived by a son, 
Steven Landers of Dorchester; 
two daughters, Joanne 
Landers of Roslindale and 
Janet Lee of Dorchester; and 
two sisters, Barbara Hague of 
Dedham and Eleanor N, 
Shamblin of Hyde Park. 

Donations may be made to 
Covenant House, P.O. Box 
731, Times Square Station, 
New York, NY 10108. 



William F. Scanlon, 86 

Retired Restaurant Chef 



A funeral Mass for William 
F. Scanlon, 86, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 12 at 
Sacred Heart Church. Burial 
was in St. Francis Xavier 
Church, Weymouth. 

Mr. Scanlon, a retired chef 
for the former Blinstrub's 
Restaurant in South Boston, 
and a chef at several other 
South Shore restaurants, died 
Jan. 9 at South Shore 
Hospital, South Weymouth, 
after a brief illness. 

He was born in Quincy and 
attended school in Braintree. 

Husband of the late Evelyn 



E. (White) Scanlan, he is 
survived by three sons, James 
E. Scanlan of Quincy, Paul H. 
Scanlan of Weymouth and 
David F. Scanlan of 
Randolph; three daughters, 
Mary A. Nickerson of 
Plymouth, and Sister Marion 
Denise and Sister Jean 
Elizabeth, both of Mount St. 
Joseph Convent in Rutland, 
Vt.; a sister, Marjorie 
Christian of Canton; 22 
grandchildren, and 26 great- 
grandchildren. He was the 
father of the late Barbara 
DeCosta. 



Daphne Powers, 59 



A funeral Mass for Daphne 
(McConnell) Powers, 59, of 
Quincy, was held Monday at 
St. Mary's Church, West 
Quincy. Mrs. Powers died 
Jan. 12 at home after a long 
illness. Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Born in Worcester, Mrs. 
Powers was educated and 
lived many years in Braintree. 
She lived in Quincy for 30 



years. 

Mrs. Powers is survived by 
her husband, Ambrose 
Powers; three daughters, 
Carol M. Broccoli of 
Somerset, Lauri Ann Powers 
and Kathy E. Powers, both of 
Quincy; and a sister, Mary E. 
Hamilton of Indiana. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Sweeney Funeral Home, 
326 Copeland St., Quincy. 




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Pate 2t Quinc) Sun Thursday, January IS. 1990 



Arts/Entertainment 



Mystery Comedy Dinner 
Theatre At Raffael's 



Raffael's restaurant, I 
Monarch Drive in the State 
Street South Towers will host 
a limited premiere engage- 
ment beginning Jan. 19 of the 
new audience participation 
mystery-comedy "Death 
Dines Out." 

Co-authors are playwrights 
John Chatterton, and Jim 
Bright who also directs the 
play and staged by Comedy 
Showcase Productions. 

"We always have heard 
from our childhood that 
crime doen't pay," observes 
Elio Ricci, owner of Raffael's, 
"but in terms of dinner- 
theatre, the comedy-mystery 
in the past several years have 
been a major box office hit 
throughout the country. 
However, it's not the dinner 
per se, nor the play that has 
excited theatregoers as much 
as it is audience partici- 
pation." 

Such is the case of "Death 
Dines Out," with a restaurant 
setting where diners are 
invited guests to a party being 
held for Henrietta Lowell 



Cabot Quincy Stone by her 
daughter to cheer the 
Brahmin dowager who has 
been saddened by the demise 
of her father and husband in a 
plane crash. Mrs. Stone, also 
a victim of the crash, was the 
only survivor. 

Unique to this dinner- 
theatre production at 
Raffael's is the extensive use 
of theatrical effects within the 
audience dining area where 
the play takes place (no stage) 
including special lighting, 
sound effects and surprise 
events. 

As the evening begins with 
a 1 /2 hour cocktail reception, 
and throughout the two-hour 
dinner to follow, the play's 
actors remain virtually 
incognito among diners with 
the exception, perhaps of the 
show's moderator portrayed 
by author/ producer John 
Chatterton, and a slightly 
offbeat undercover policeman 
in attendance on a separate 
investigation. TTie masque- 
rade of identity is sustained 
throughout the show because 



innocent diners - not always 
cast members - are swept into 
the plot as interrogated 
suspects of crimes which 
occur during the party. 

Diners will receive ballots 
in their show programs which 
are used at the conclusion of 
the mystery-comedy to decide 
who committed the crimes 
and the reason why. When the 
special investigator has 
announced his conclusions, 
prizes will be awarded to 
audience members for both 
the best and worst "indict- 
ments." 

"Death Dines Out" plays 
Friday and Sunday, Jan. 19 
and 2 1 , 26 and 28; and Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 2, 
3 and 4; and 9, 10 and II. 

Performances begin on 
Fridays and Saturdays with 
cocktails at 7:30, dinner and 
show at 8 and on Sunday with 
cocktails at 6:30 and dinner 
and show at 7. 

Reservations are required 
and may be obtained by 
calling 328-1600. 



Quincy Pianist- Vocalist 
Performing In Boston Area 



Suzanna Sifter of Quincy, a 

graduate of Berklee College of 

Music, is performing 

regularly at several Boston 

locations. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST. 773-4600 

Wed & Thurs Jan 17 & 18 

Chevy Chase 

"CHRISTMAS 

VACATION" (PG-13) 

A Family Comedy 

Eves 7:00 Only 

Starts FrI Jan 19 

Jeff & Beau Bridges 

"THE FABULOUS 

BAKER BOYS" (R) 

A Dramatic Tale 

Fri&Sat 7:00 & 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



The pianist/ vocalist, a 
magna cum laude graduate 
who is a member of the Ear 
Training Department, is 
entertaining regularly on 

Friday and Saturday nights in 
the Cambridge Hyatt 



ALL SEATS »3.00 



IRISH 

FOLK 

MUSICIAN 

328-0645 

Al - After 6 p.m. 



Regency's Pally Saddle 
lounge. She will be at 
Somerville's Willow Jazz 
Club on Monday, Jan. 22, 
and at the Middle East Cafe in 
Cambridge on Monday, Jan. 
29. 

She will also perform a 
Senior Masters Recital at the 
New England Conservatory 
on Sunday, Feb. 4 at 4 p.m. in 
Williams Hall. 

Sifter will lead the Suzanna 
Sifter Quartet in a Valentine's 
Day celebration on Wed- 
nesday, Feb. 1 4, at RylesJazz 
Club, 212 Hampshire St., 
Inman Square, Cambridge. 
The program will feature 
original works by Sifter. 

Save Gas and Money . . . 
Shop Locally 




, 




feiiAam 



Cantonese and Szechuan Cuisine 
Orders To Go - Cocktails 

105 Sea Street, Quincy 
471-2255 




7^ ^.l'^"".^^^^^^-;; °'""^'^ ^^ ■ ^"^'y ^°" Nite: C/W Night - Every 

Tl) ^! i i:. E^.«^ J^^^s: Java J,ve - Every Fri: Oldies & Top 40s - Every 

^- ,5 :1"^^ ^"^'^ ' ^''^^y ^""- Sunday Brunch 9-3 p m Kids $2 99 Adults 

:'^ARr $6,49 - Function Room Available for up to 1 75 people 

15 COTTAGE AVE. QUINCY (NEXT TO HANLONS) 



PILGRIM 
RESTAURANT 



'Quincy's Family Restaurant" 



1472 HANCOCK ST., 
QUINCY 



Call Pilgrim II Go 

For Take Out 

773-5356 



tCNTtl^ 

restaurant /bar 



Quincy Fair Mali, 1585 Hancock St , Quincy Serving all fresh 
foods Lunch and dinner at very affordable prices. Open 
Monday-Sat 11 30-11:00 and Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. 479-8655 




V 1 

ME.MBhKS Oh THK( hildren's Theater Workshuppreparcfor upcoming productions Jan. 20 

and Jan. 27 al 3p.m. and Jan. 28al 7p.m. at the Woodward .School, 1102 Hancock St. From left 

are Alex Jarvie. Kric Turvi and Nicholas C'himi of Quinc>. 

Children's Theatre Workshop 
Prepares January Productions 

The Children's Theatre 
Woricshop will stage their 
production on four weekends 
in January. The Schedule: 

Saturday, Jan. 20 one 
show, 3 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 
27, two shows starting at 3 
p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 28 one 
show, starting at 7 p.m. 



The shows will be held at 
the Woodward School, 1102 
Hancock St., Quincy Center. 
Admission will be $4 at the 
door, advanced (reserved) 
tickets, children under 12 and 
Senior Citizens $3. 

The Jan. 20, 3 p.m. show to 
be presented is entitled 



"Robbery In Strawberry Fizz 
Saloon!" Children seven to 15 
are in the cast. 

On Jan. 27, 3 p.m., will be 
"The Toymaker!" and "Mist 
Over The Mississippi!" The 
seven to 15 are set in the year 
2015. 



Quincy Dinner Theatre 
To Present Adult Comedy 



Quincy Center Dinner 
Theatre, 1170 Hancock St., 
will launch the new year with 
a production of "Cheaters. 

Presented by Darling 
Productions in association 
with rural lodge AF and AM, 
this adult comedy will be 
presented Jan. 27 and 28, Feb. 



3,4, 10, II. 

Directed by John Macero 
of Saugus the cast includes 
Molly Hockheppel of 
Cohasset, Tommie Stevens of 
Braintree, Joe Doniger of 
Randolph, Mike Kelly of 
Watertown, John Quatrucchi 
of Stoughton and Pietra Beis 



of Waltham. 

Cost of a course dinner and 
show is $25., Saturday night 
and $22.50 Sunday. Social 
hour starts at 6:30, dinner, 
7:15 and the show at 9 on 
Saturday. Social hours is 
4:30, dinner 5:30 and show at 
7 on Sundav. 



Art Auction To Benefit 
QHS, Vo-Tech School 



Ross Galleries will conduct 
an Art Auction Thursday, 
Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. at the Quincy 
Neighborhood Club, 27 
Glendale Rd. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 

1/12-1/18 



BORN ON THE 
4th OF JULY - R 

1 1 :25 - 2:00 - 4:35 • 7:10 - 9: 45 . 

WAR OF THE 
ROSES - R 

11:45- 2:05-4:35- 7:00- 9:35 

INTERNAL 
AFFAIRS - R 

11:35- 2:05-4:40- 7:00 - 9:35 

TEXAS CHAINSAW 
MASSACRE III - R 

Call Thaaitr For Showtimtt 



SKI PATROL - PG 

12:05 - 2:10 - 4:45 - 7:15 - 9:30 



TANGO & CASH -R 

CaH ThMltr For ShowtImM 



THEWIZZARD-PG 

CaH ThMlar For ShowttmM 

STEEL 
MAGNOLIAS - PG 

CaH Thaalar For Showtlma* 



MUSIC BOX -PG-13 

11:25- 2:00-4:35- 7:00- kSS 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.50 

773-5700 



A preview will be held at 7 
p.m. 

Sponsored by Friends for a 
Better Quincy High School 
and Quincy Vocational 
Technical School, the auction 
will benefit both Quincy High 
School and Quincy Vo- 
cational Technical School. 

The auction will feature 
works by: Delacroix, Chagall, 
Calder, Miro, Dali, Boulanger 
M OSes, Neiman, and 
Rockwell, as well as 



lithographs, silk screens, o\\ 
paintings, enamels, etchings, 
watercolors, etc. 

There will be a cash bar. 
and light refreshments. 
Admission is $5 per person. 
Tickets can be purchased at 
Roseann's, 1091 Hancock St.. 
and Handshakes Cafe, 1354 
Hancock St. 

For ticket information call 
Mary Chenette at 471-1596, 
or Claire Verlicco at 471- 
6571. 



Rummage Sale At 
St. Chrysostom's 



St. Chrysostom's Episcopal 
Church will sponsor a 
rummage sale on Saturday, 
Jan. 27, from 10a.m. to 3 p.m. 
at the church, located at 
Hancock and Linden Sts., 



Wollaston. The Mite Box 
Thrift Shop will be open that 
day also. 

Those with donations for 
the sale are asked to call the 
Church office at 472-9737. 



(l|ister5UB 

64 Billings Road, No. Quincy 
328-9764 - FAX 786-9792 

— PASTA — 

Linguini 3.95 

Linguini & Meatball 4.95 

Linguini & Sausage 4.95 

Linguini 

& Chicken Parmigiana . . . 5.95 

Ziti may be substituted for linguini 

ALL OF ABOVE SERVED WITH 

DINNER ROLL, BUTTER. GRATED CHEESF 



Thursday. Januar> 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Pace 21 



Quincy Cable TV 



New Support Croups 
At Beechwood Center 



Ch. 3 



The local proRram schedule for 
Quinc> (ablesyslems ( h. 3 from 
Wednesday. Jan. 17. to Frida>. 
Jan. 26. 

WedneMiay, Jan. 17 
5:57 pm Rhvmcs ot I he limes 

6 pm Big Wheels 

7 pm SportN Tie. 

X pm Senior Spotlight 

Thur<kday, Jan. 18 
5:57 pm Rhymes ol I he limes 

6 pm TBA 

7 pm Medical Watch 
7:30 pm Quincv Magazine 



Friday. Jan. 19 
NO PR()(;RAMMI\(i 

Sunday. Jan. 21 

(5.^) 5 pm ( hinese l'r..gruiiiming 
Monday. Jan. 22 

.^:57 pm Rh\mes dI ihe limes. 
■'Ski Hiisiness Now Dig Hiisiness" 

6 pm Sp. ; Ka, 

7 pm yuine> Ho\\ Haskeiball 

Tuesday. Jan. 2.1 
fi-fil pm Rh\mes oi iIk- Iiuks. 
"Ho« America I ais" 
<-> pm I ibiar\ Hook \..ok 
6:.1(l pm ChiUlien's I'logi.iiiiinmg 
X pm lalk \h,,ul IheXliiul 



Wednesday. Jan. 24 

5:.^7 pm Rhymes ol j he limes 
"Ihe Ihrill lo Ski Down .i Hill" 
^ pm Dan lever 
7 pm Quinex Sports Scene 
K pm Senior Smarts 

Ihursday. Jan. 25 
.'':57 pm Rhvmcs ol Ihe limes 
"How to Stay I it lor I ile" 
(^ pm I HA 

^:.V) pm Q.IC Vlaga/inc 
"' pm Medical Watch - 
( holesterol 
7:.1() pm I BA 

Friday. Jan. 26 
NO l'R()(,K \MMI\(, 



Two support groups at the 
Beechwood Counseling 
Services, Inc., 225 Fenno St., 
Wollaston, will begin in early 
February. 

They are: 

• Adult Children of 
Dysfunctional Families. 



Daily and evening groups to 
begin in early February in 
Quincy and Norwell. Call 
Wayne Dunlop, 472-5428 by 
Friday, Jan. 26. 

• Male Abuse Survivors 
and Feinale Sexual Abuse 
Survivors- in Quincy. 



Separate 12-week support 
groups beginning in early 
February for those victimized 
as children. 

Free individual interview 
before group. Call Tim 
Lanham or Cheryl Alvord, 
472-5428. 



NQHS Parent Board To Meet Jan. 31 



The North Quincy High 
School Parent Board will 
meet on Wednesday, Jan. 31 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Trophy 



Room. 

All N.Q.H.S. parents are 
welcome and are asked to 
bring Stop & Shop register 



tapes and the bottom portion 
of Bradlees receipts for use in 
the "Apples for Students" 
program. 



Historical Commission 
Hearing On Signs Jan. 29 



The Quincy Historical 
Commission will hold a 
public hearing Monday, Jan. 
29 at 7:30 p.m. in the third 



floor conference room. City 
Hall annex. 

The Commission will 
consider the installation of 



two exterior signs at the 
parking garage entrances at 
Presidents Place on Saville 
Ave. and Coddington St. 




We enchanting 

classic... now a new 

animated series! 



MONDAYS 
ON HBO 

Exclusively on 

9 




QCTVS PRESENTS: 

LIBRARY 




A delightful half hour of storytelling, 

crafts and activities for children, 

produced at the Thomas Crane 

Public Library in Quincy. 

AT A NEW TIME! 

TUESDAYS 
at 6 P.M. 

ONLY ON QCTV 




LOCAL PROGRAMMING FOR C0^iTINE^4TAL CABLEVISION , 




CONTINENTAL CABLEVISION 
471-9143 




"A BUO\ANT COMEDY! 

CONTAINS ttU\T VL\J BE THE \I.\R'S 
SINGLE MOST I PR0.\R101S SCENE." 

-(.fwi/ialil,Mr()llA)lH(IH.\B( n 

"A WINNER." 

-Prl.TTraviT<.RiiLUM.Mn\hMAi,\/INt 

"SOME OF THE 
BIGGEST LAUGHS." 

"WHAT A MOVIE!" 

-Rl^hJ^l^w(1mJll^^;^^Hlll^[,^^.^^^^\P^.K^ 



"DELICIOUSLY FUNNY..': 



r.:L M H J J fyjl 



When Harry Mel Sally... 

CASTlEROCKE\TEEMJ^TiNAssocwioNmNILSONENIERTAm^^ 

psesentsaROBREI^TRfil^ BMCRYSm MEGRM 

"MM\RRY.METSM.: CMRIEFISHER BR^KIRBY 

™^l' ROBERT LEIGHTON ™SJANEMUSKY pSS BARRY SONNENFELD 

S^ MARC mm '*""'"»? ROB REIMR and MEW SCHEIMAN 



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Date(s) 



Mon. 1-22-90 
Tues. 1-23-90 
Wed. 1-24-90 



Time 

5:00 pm 
9:00 pm 
7:00 pm 



Event Code 

1214 
1226 
1235 



Check your Cableguide for other 
Dates and Times 

Staff: 471-9143 Computer Phone: 328-9090 

CONTINENTAL CABLEVISION 



P»tt 22 Quinc> Sun Thunday. Januan 18, 1990 



Guest's 4 Coals 
Spark Bearing 



Panther Cheerleaders 
Fundraiser Jan. 22 



HELP WANTED 



«^ 



Frankie Guest scored four 
goals and added two assists to 
spark South Shore Bearing to 
a 7-3 victory over Roman 
Gardens in Quincy Executive 
Hockey League action 
Monday night at the Youth 

Ar«»nfl 

Ken Gardiner, Chip 
Linscott and Steve Dyment 
had the other goals. Jay 
Powers had two assists and 
Linscott, Bob Carroll and 
Gardiner one each. Stan 
Lizowski, Mike Owings and 
Jim Gilmore scored for 
Roman Gardens. Owings had 
two assists and Lizowski and 
John Ryan one apiece. 

Beacon Sports defeated 
Flibbotte's Auto, 5-3, as Artie 
Boyle scored two goals and 
Joe Verlicco, Dennis Bertoni 



and Rich DePietro one each. 
Bertoni and DePietro had two 
assists each and Chuck 
Behenna one. Jim Cooney, 
Kevin Lewis and Mark 
Paolucci scored for Flibbottc. 
Lewis had two assists and 
Rich Delisle one. 

Scip Manganaro had a hat 
trick and an assist as Adams 
Sports defeated Grumpy's 
Pub, 6-4. Dave Peters had two 
goals and Dave Lewis one. 
Lewis had three assists and 
Peters and Fred Cobban two 
each. Dick McCabe, Mark 
Boulter, Dave Perdios and 
Rick Joyce scored for 
Grumpy's. Gary DcCoste had 
two assists and Ralph Gibbs, 
Chet Brunstrom, Rich Joyce, 
Boulter, Perdios and Marty 
Tolson one each. 



School Menu 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Jan. 22-26 

Mon: Italian Pi//a with 
mo//arclla and chcddar 
cheese. Iruit juice, milk. 

Tues: No Lunch 

Wed: Curiey Rotini 
macaroni with meatballs, 
fresh baked Italian roll, fruit 
cup. milk. 

Thurs: Peanut butter and 
jelly sandwich with cheese 
chunks, pineapple chunks, 
milk. 

Fri: Apple sauce, golden 
brown pancakes, sausage 
links, maple syrup, milk. 

SECONDARY 

Jan. 22-26 

Mun: Italian pizza with 
tomato sauce tupping, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: l-.arly Release Day. 
Middle Schools. Mot 
pastrami on a buikie roll, cole 
slaw, frosted cake, fruit juice, 
milk. 

Wed: American chop sue> . 
green peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, fresh apple, milk. 

Thurs: furkey fricasee with 
mashed potato, sliced carrots, 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 90P0018E1 
Estate of RAYMOND JOHN 
GIAGRANDO. St. late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
deceased be proved and 
allowed and that RAYMOND 
J. GIGRANDO. Jr., named in 
the will as RAYMOND JOHN 
GIAGRANDO, Jr., of 
BRAINTREE in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 
21, 1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the eighth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUOHCt 

Rtgltter of Prol»al« 

1/18/90 



cranberry sauce, fresh baked 
wheal roll. milk. 

Fri: baked lasagna with 
meat sauce, green beans, fresh 
baked Italian roll, milk. 



The Quincy Point Panther 
cheerleaders will hold a Papa 
Gino's Night fundraiser 
Monday, Jan. 22 to raise 
funds for their trip to the 
National Cheerleading 
championships in Orlando, 
Fla. 

A portion of the proceeds 
on orders from S to 10 p.m. at 
the 100 Granite St. location 
will go for accomodations for 
the 12-member squad, the 
state cheerleading champions. 
Takeout orders at 472-3206 
will also be included. 

This is the third organized 
fundraiser the cheerleaders 
have held to help defray 
expenses for their five-day 
trip to Orlando. They have 
held a tag day and candy sales. 

Soccer Champs 

Local 103 won the Quincy 
Youth Soccer League's girls' 
under 14 championship and 
the Quincy Police Club won 
the boys' under 14 title. 



Police Hot Spots 



Monday, Jan. 8: 
4:36 pm, break, 35 Mayflower Rd. Under investigation. 

Tuesday, Jan. 9: 
3:47 pm, Armed Robbery, 764 Hancock St. Suspect 
described as white male, mid 20's, blond hair, 5'7" 
wearing jeans and a tan jacket. Suspect fled on foot 
toward St. Ann's Church. 

11:31 pm, M/V break, Ross Parking area. Caller 
reports an '89 VW broken into. Stereo radio stolen. 

Wednesday, Jan. 10: 
3:49 pm, Att. Armed Robbery, 161 Newbury Ave. Kims 
Market. Suspect described as a white male, 25 years. 
5*4" wearing a black and white sweatshirt. Suspect had 
collar length brown hair. A knife was shown. 

Thursday, Jan. 11: 
5:31 pm, M/Bbreak,42! Hancock St. Caller reports an 
'86 Ford Mustang broken into. Several items stolen. 

Friday, Jan. 12: 
12:40 pm. Break, 37 Hayden St. Suspect described as a 
white, male, wearing a black leather jacket, and a multi- 
colored head band. Suspect had a female companion. 
3:03 pm. Armed Robbery, 470 Sea St. Cumbrland 
Farms Gas Station. Suspect is a white male, 35 to 40 
years, wearing a white "T" shirt. Suspect had dirty 
blond hair. 

Saturday, Jan. 13: 
10:49 pm. Break, 71 Cleverly Ct. under investigation. 
12:25 pm. Break, 17 Hollis Ave. under investigation. 

Sunday, Jan. 14: 
11:25 am. Break, 200 Falls Blvd. Under investigation. 

Services for Week: 911 Calls-703; Wagon Runs-32; 
Vehicles Towed-36. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 313. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETtS 

COUNTY OF NORFOLK 

PROPOSAL 

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Norfolk County 
Commissioners, Administration Building, P.O. Box 310. 614 
High Street, Dedham, MA 02026 for: 

WOLLASTON RECREATIONAL FACILITY: 

Rubbush Removal Wednesday, January 31, 1990 @ 1:15 PM 

To be considered, bids must be received by 1:15 p.m. on the 
above date(s) at which time and place they will t>e publicly 
opened and read. Bids must be in a sealed envelope and on the 
outside be clearly marked with the date and description of bid. 

Details of contract requirements and specifications shall be 
obtained at the Commissioners Office (PURCHASING) in the 
Administration Building, second floor, between the hours of 
8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

The Norfolk County Commissioners reserve the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids: or to accept any bid or portion thereof 
deemed by them to be in the best interest of the County. 

Bidders are on notice that the Commissioners neither 
individually nor collectively are to be contacted, nor will they 
discuss any bids prior to the scheduled opening. Prior 
the bids should be presented to the 



complaints atx>ut 
Purchasing Agent. 



1/18/90 



James J. Collins, Chairman 

David C. Ahearn 

Mary P. Collins 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



Along with donations 
received at Quincy area 
shopping centers, they have 
been prese nted with 
donations from Shore Taxi, 
Mary Travers, Mrs. Mary 
Brusin, Quincy Police 
Superior Officers Ass'n., 
John and Violet Gillis, Jim 
Gambiano of Jimbo's Cafe, 
WCF Oil, Foley Chrysler- 
Plymouth, Pipefitters Local 
and Nora and John Gillis. 

Donations can be sent to 
the Quincy Point Panthers, 
c/o Curran, 23 Smith St., 
Quincy 02169. 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 88P2489E1 

Estate of VINCENZA R. 

GANGI late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that VIRGINIA 
ANN ZOROVIC of NATICK 
in the County of MIDDLESEX 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or tjefore 1 0:00 in 
the forenoon on January 24, 
1990. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
thirteenth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty nine. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/18/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3229E1 

Estate of DOROTHY ANN 

ULEVICIUS late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A Petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that SANDRA 
ANN GOLDSTEIN of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 14, 
1990 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fourth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of ProlMtt 
1/18/90 



TYPESETTERS 

Part-Time 

Experience preferred 
but will train good typist 




1372 Hancocic St., Quincy Square 
471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 86P2587E1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of ELVA M. 
MacFADEN lateof Quincy, in 
said County, deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of Scott 
MacFadden as Executor (the 
fiduciary) of said estate have 
been presented to said Court 
for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the thirty-first day of 
January, 1990, the return day 
of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return or within such other 
time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such objection thereto, 
a copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty-eighth day 
of December, 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register 

1/18/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 90P0003GM 

NOTICE OF 

GUARDIANSHIP OF 

MINOR 

To THOMAS E. 

SHANAHAN of PARTS 
UNKNOWN and NEISA 
LYNN SHANAHAN of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK and to all 
persons interested in the 
estates of NEISA LYNN 
SHANAHAN In said 
County, minor. A petition 
has been presented in the 
above-captioned matter 
praying that WALLACE 
HOLOHAN of FITCH- 
BURG in the County of 
WORCESTER be appointed 
Guardian of minor with 
custody with surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or t>efore ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
April 11, 1990. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, this 
eighth day of January, in 
the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/18/90 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 83F1483E1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARrS ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of PHEBE J. 
SANDS late of QUINCY. in 
said County deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of Paul J. Sullivan 
as Executor (the fiduciary) of 
said estate of the will of said 
deceased have been 
prsented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the fourteenth day of 
February 1990. the return day 
of this citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return or within such other 
time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each such objection thereto, 
a copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court this tenth day of 
January 1990. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
RegMer 
1/18/90 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 90P0024A1 

Estate of PATRICK J. 

GREENE late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that HONOR GREENE of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
administratrix of said estate 
with surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 1 0:00 in 
the forenoon on February 14, 
1990 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the eighth 
day of January, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Registor of Probate 

1/18/90 



Thursday, January 18, 1990 Quincy Sun Pagt 2^ 




HELP WANTED 



ATTENTION: 

EASY WORK, EXCELLENT 
PAY! 

Assemble products at home 
Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext W- 
23791 

1 25 

ATTENTION: 

EARN MONEY TYPING AT 
HOME! 

$32.000/yr income potential 
Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext T- 
2380 

1 25 

ATTENTION - HIRING! 

Government jobs - your area. 
$17.840- $69,485. Call 1-602- 
838-8885. Ext. R2379 

1/25 



REAL ESTATE 



FOR RENT 
STORE AND OFFICE 

600 sq ft. plus basement, 
parking 65 Billings Rd by 
Hancock St., Ouincy Ask next 
store to show $440 Owner, no 
fee 734-8172 

1/25 

ATTENTION 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U-repaIr). Delinquent 
tax property Repossessions 
Call 1-602-838-8885 Ext GH 
2379 ,/,8 

ATTENTIoTi 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U-repair) Delinquent 
tax property Reposessions Call 
1-602-838-8885 Ext GH 2379 

I 25 



INSTRUCTION 



JOY of PIANO 
JOY of ORGAN 

Letsona 
323-0698 



2/15 



WANTED 



GOVERNMENT SEIZED 

Vehicles from $100. Fords 
Mercedes Corvettes Chevys 
Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805- 
687-6000 Ext. S-3019 

10/12 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Share quiet 3 bdrm house. $290/ 
mo plus 1/3 utils. Near hwy 93, 
on bus route to Red Line W/D 
Must like pets. Days 426-7330 
ext 233 Nights 773-5959. 

1/18 

WANTED 

Companion tor elderly woman 
Wednesday evenings 7 to 11 pm 
only If interested please call 479- 
6397 before 3 p m 

1/18 

SEARCHING FOR 

RELIABLE CHILD CARE 

in my Wollaston home. 

Mother of three ages 8. 5 and 3 
Mon , Wed. Fri 9-4:30, Tues & 
Thurs 5-9 p m References and 
own transportation required 
For more info, call 773-3547 

2/8 

PERSONALS 

Holy Spirit you who solve all 
problems, who light all roads so that 
I can attain my goal, youwhog:veme 
the divine gift to forgive and gorget 
all evil against me and who m all 
instances o( my lile are with me, I 
wnat in this short prayer tothanh you 
for all things and to confirm once 
again that I never want to be 
separated from you and even in spite 
of all meterial illusion I wish to be 
with you in eternal glory Thank you 
for your mercy toward me and mine 
Repeal this prayer 3 consecutive 
days After 3 days the favor will be 
granted even though it may appear 
difficult This prayer must be 
published immediately after favor is 
granted without mentioning the 
favor 
JEM 1 18 

THANK YOU 
ST. JUDE 

for prayers answered 

MLH 

1/18 



SERVICES 



INSIDEOUT 

Deleading & 
Painting Co. 

• MA Certificate 000161 

• Reasonable Prices 

• Free Estimates 

Call 471-2843 
Leave Message 



VINYL 

REPLACEMENT 

WINDOWS 

• Reasonable Rates 

• Reasonable Labor 

• or buy direct and save 30% 

on your own installation 
Call Steve GoMelln 

335-5894 



for Free Estimate 



2/8 



HOUSEKEEPER 

For a quality housekeeper or 
housecleaner Dependable and 
references 

Kathy 479-2101 



HOME REPAIR 

MADE AFFORDABLE 

Interior-Exterior Work 

No Job Too Small 

Call Dan Brown 472-9662 

1 25 



SPOTLESS CLEANING 
SERVICE 

Have your home, office, etc 
cleaned to perfettion Excellent 
references, reliable and efficient 
Phone 471-7788 

2 1 



FOR RENT 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Sons of Italy Sociai Center 
Golden Lion Suite - Capacity 300 
Venetian Room-capacity 140 
Call 472-5900 tf 

HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St, 

Quinfy 

472-2223 

TF 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 

HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No. 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 

WANTED 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Old woodworking tools, hand 

planes, surplus hand tools: all 

trades Precision machinist 

tools, shoplots 

558-3889 also 527-1916 

4 '5 

WANTED TO BUY 

Furniture - Estates 
Highest prices for entire 
contents -attic to cellar Also 
separate items-boks, clocks, 
wicker, prints, glass, etc. Call 
Alden 472-4917 

2/22 



Old and New 
Furniture Bought 

Also rugs, clocks, paintings, 

glassware and bric-a-brac 

749-6475 

OLD OIL PAINTINGS 
WANTED 

Wanted to buy: old oil 
paintings; Marine, landscape, 
Impressionist or Traditional. 
Also Watercolors. old books, 
prints, frames and postcards 
SS6-3839 Also 527-1916 

2/12 



EVERYBODY'S MAHKETPUGE 



SERVICES 



THE LITTLE MAN 

Construction 

ROOFING, CARPENTRY, GUTTERS 

DECKS, PORCHES, PAINTING 

STRUCTURAL WORK, REPAIRS 

No Job Too Big or Small 

Call Chris 471-8218 




2/1 




Protect Your Investrnent 

Coletti Painting 

Gutters Cleaned 

Interior & Exterior 



786-1864 Marl( Coletti 773-3720 

North Quincy Free Estimates 3/8 




WALLPAPERING 

• FREE ESTIMATES 

• REASONABLE RATES 

• SMALL JOBS WELCOME 
CALL RICHARD VESPAZIANI 

479-6160, Aflcr 5 PM 

1/25 



AVON CALLING! 

Do you know what your best 

colors are'' The right colors can 

make a big difference Call Ginny 

328-6371 

2/1 



NEW ENGLAND 
INTERIOR 

Residential Commercial 

Renovations 

Vinyl Siding, Roofing. Gutters 

Replacement Windows, Insulation 

Licensed and Insured 

1-800-782-0816 

2/1 

SHEETROCKING 

Attn; Do It Yourselfers' 
Semi-retired taper can assist you 
from planning to finishing 
Please leave message 328-9685 

3 8 



EDDIE'S WELDING & 
METAL FABRICATION 

Offers portable service In all 
types of repairs and light iron 
fabrication. Free Estimates 
(617)471-2059 

3/1 

J.N. ELECTRICAL C(3. 

Fully Licensed and Insured 

No Job Too Small 

Lie #E28696 Free Estimates 

11 Hallam St., Boston, MA 02125 

JsckNe* (617)288-6467 

2/1 

WALLCOVERING 

Residential/Commercial 

Free Estimates 

Call John Stankus 

479-1104 or 269-0352 

1/18 

PAINTING 

Interior • Exterior 

Wallpapering • Wood Staining 

Licensed • Insured 

We use 1st Quality Products 

You gel Top Quality Results 

For Estimates Call 

963-1613 1/25 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

lAMP REPAIR 
t REWIRING 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
■ QUINCV TF 

LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

TAX RETURNS 

Richard McDonough 
Professional Service in your 
home. Enrolled to practice 
t>efore the IRS. Registered 
Investment Advisor 472- 
2694, 545-7919 

4/12 

LOSE WEIGHT! 

Safely and effectively as Oprah 

at one fifth the cost with "Food 

For Life Weight Management 

System" 

Call 472-9662 or 
696-1089 

2/17 

CARPENTRY 

Roofing, Painting, Porch Work, 

Vinyl Siding, Windows, Doors, 

Gutters. Etc. 

No Job Too Small 

Free Estimates 

T. SwMfity 82S-1210 

3/29 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuunn 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(scissors. I(nives. etc ) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums 

• Electroluxw/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St . So Quincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 




SULLIVAN 

LANDSCAPE 

AND 

TREE SERVICE 

Free Estimates 

472-3595 



3/1 



^E DO IT 41.^ 
WELDING CO. 



QUINCY ^479-0991 

3/1 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 




(^V\an/)e/ 



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MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA02169 
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Pace 24 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 18, 1990 



3 To 13.7% Budget Cuts Ride On Sewer User Fee 



(Cont'd from Hafe IJ 

Island and other improve- 
ments to the MWRA sewer 
system. 
In addition, the fee would 



help pay half of the city's sewer budget for overhead 
Sewer, Water and Drain and $214,000 for debt service, 



Department; 25 percent of the 
sewer salary line for employee 
benefits; seven percent of 



Colton said. 

The commissioner empha- 
sized the city needs the fee to 



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offset a S3.4 million reduction 
in state aid and soaring sewer 
assessments. He noted that in 
previous years, multi-million 
dollar surpluses covered those 
costs. 

However, this year there 
will not be any major surplus. 
This fiscal year is expected to 
end with a $10 million deficit 
but a surplus should covet 
that shortfall. 

"The city should be 
congratulated for being able 
to absorb those costs. But 
when state aid is cut and 
assessments jump, it's a 
double whammy. 

"We don't have control 
over assessments and we don't 
have control over state aid," 
Colton said. 

Sheets decided to propose 
the plan early to give the 
Council enough time to 
discuss it. He noted that he 
has until April 2 to submit 
next year's budget. 

Before drafting it. Sheets 
said he wants to know the fate 
of his plan. Either way, the 
mayor admitted there will be 
cuts. 

"Obviously, I want cuts to 
be made which will least affect 
the level of services. We'll try 



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to make the cuts in those areas 
which least affect the delivery 
of services. 

"I think the department 
heads know where these cuts 
can best be made," Sheets 
said. 

"I think it comes down to 
the level of city services. If we 
don't have a sewer user fee, 
you're going to see many cuts 
in all departments and that 
will reduce the level of 
services. 

"I don't think anyone wants 
a sewer user fee but the 
question is, at what level are 
you going to continue to fund 
the services Quincy has? The 
only revenue we can use is the 
sewer user fee. If the decision 
is no, we'll make the cuts," 
Sheets said. 

Asked whether he thinks 
the public supports his plan, 
the mayor replied, "I think the 
public is aware the city is in a 
deficit situation." 

He pointed out that he 
discussed the city's fmancial 
future at a press conference in 
December with former Mayor 
Francis McCauley and again 
during his Inaugural Address 
two weeks ago. 

Sheets added, "Do the 
people want to pay a sewer 
user fee. No. Do I want to pay 
a sewer user fee? No. No one 
wants to pay additional fees 
but we're in a deficit because 
of what the state has done." 

The fee proposal is 
expected to spark some 
spirited debate among 
councillors. There appears to 
be the necessary support for 
passage (five out of nine 
councillors) but several are 
still undecided. 

One councillor who 
supports the measure is Peter 
Kolson who represents Ward 
1. Kolson, one of two 
freshmen councillors, said the 
city "will come to a grinding 
halt" without the fee. 

"We all understand the 
predicament we're in," he 
said, noting the state's red ink 
and reductions in state aid. 
"The state has done a lousy, 
lousy job. The tail is wagging 
the dog. There's absolutely no 
leadership. It seems each 
representative has his or her 
own agenda." 

Continuing, Kolson said, 
"We're going to have to vote 
for this. There's no wav out. I 



know everyone is over- 
burdened with taxes but I just 
don't see any other way, at 
least not for the near future 
anyway. 

"The city is going to come 
to a grinding halt if we don't 
pass it. We will cease to exist," 
he added. 

One councillor who is 
opposed to the fee is Thomas 
Nutley from Ward 6. Nutley, 
who estimated his water and 
sewer bill would escalate to 
$2,000 by 1996 if the fee is 
adopted, said, "I don't know 
how people can pay it." 

Nutley, who met with 
Sheets Tuesday morning, 
said, "I want to see all of the 
current numbers in writing. I 
want to see all the projected 
numbers showing cuts in 
writing," he said. 

During their meeting, 
Nutley suggested several 
alternatives to the sewer user 
fee. Among them were no pay 
increases for city employees 
next year as well as a $10 
million Proposition 2 and a 
half override. He noted that 
an override would allow 
homeowners to deduct the 
sewer bill from their federal 
income taxes. 

Nutley also said he is 
"strongly opposed to any 
political patronizing that 
some might be apt to do" in 
light of the sewer user fee 
proposal such as allowing 
some groups to be exempt. 

Furthermore, Nutley has 
suggested more consolidation 
and joining Quincy and North 
Quincy High School. 

"My recommendations are 
less regressive. They're not 
painful to the working class. 
The sewer bill is more 
regressive." 

In addition, Nutley 
suggested raising revenue by 
charging each family $50 for 
each household car over two. 
This plan would raise nearly 
$2 million, Nutley estimated. 

The councillor also said the 
city is adopting state policies 
by raising taxes when times 
are fiscally tight. 

"We're all too busy wiping 
up the flood (current deficit), 
no one remembered to turn 
off the faucet (future deficit). 
We can't go on like the state 
spending more than we take 
in," he said. 




("AMD IT'S A UOMCt) 
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THE NUMBCR ONi 



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Quincy, Lakin Sq., 581 Adams St. - Wollaston, 624 Hancock St. 
So. Quincy, 320 Quincy Ave. - East Milton, 338 Granite Ave. 



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PAST PRESIDKNTS OF the Muntclair Men's Club shown in this 1960'sphotu, included, frum 
left, Howard IMacDuugall, Frederick Farrell, Juhn White, Matthew SMith, Richard Post, 
Dana Valencia, Joseph (iildea and James Kelley. 

Closes After 42 Years 

Montclair Men's Club 
Slips Into History 



The Montclair Men's Club, 
a civic-social institution for 
more than four decades, has 
passed quietly into Quincys 
history. 

The 42-year-old club closed 
its doors at the end of 
December and the familiar 
green shingled single story 
wooden building on Holbrook 
Rd. has been sold. 

It has been purchased by 
Richard Mulcahy of Hanover 
and is now undergoing 
interior and exterior 
renovations for its new role as 
a day care center. Purchase 
price was reported as 
$150,000. 

"It was a sad thing to do but 
there was little choice," says 
Joseph Gildea of Division St.. 
a charter member and second 
president of the club. 

Gildea, himself a club 
institution, was chairman of 
the popular annual Sports 
Nights which brought some of 
the biggest names in 
professional sports to the club 
to be honored for their 
achievements. 

The club became a victim of 
the times. 

Gildea attributes its demise 
to a lack of new members and 



to rising taxes and costs to 
operate the club and maintain 
the building. 

"The young people just did 
not want to join or could not," 
he says. "They simply did not 
have the interest or the time. 

"A lot of them are now 
working two jobs trying to 
buy a house. They don't have 
the time to join or take part in 
the club." 

Gildea estimates the club 
ha i 110 members of record at 
the end but, he says, "very few 
we.e active." Dues were only 
$20 a year. 

Another problem was 
vandalism to the clubhouse, 
Gildea says. 

Taxes, he says, were 
continually rising and some of 
the members were kicking in 
to help pay them. 

The club was a voice of the 
people in the Montclair 
section of North Quincy and 
an effective one in many 
instances. 

Members, for example, 
strongly opposed a proposal 
to build condominiums on the 
Wollaston Golf Course off 
West Squantum St. when that 
club pulled up stakes and 
moved to Milton. 



Instead of condos, or other 
development, the course 
remained open space and 
became the Presidents Golf 
Course operated by Norfolk 
County. 

Club members also 
successfully fought plans for 
an incinerator on the 
Montclair marshes and 
speeding traffic in the area. 
They also got improved street 
lighting. 

"We had a nice group- of 
members," says Gildea. "It 
was sad for us to have to end 
it." 

Among the members were 
many political figures 
including Lt. Gov. Francis 
Bellotti, Mayors James 
Mclntyre, Joseph LaRaiaand 
Arthur Tobin, Senator Paul 
Harold, Rep. Joseph Brett 
and others. Politically, the 
club endorsed only members 
running for office. 

Sixty one persons were 
honored by the club at its 
Sports Nights which began in 
1949 at the North Quincy 
High School auditorium and 
moved to the clubhouse in 
1951. Among them, most of 
them sports fieures. were: 
(i.iiniil I'll I'lifn- ■')) 



Sheets Names Fishman 
New Personnel Director 



Kathleen D. Fishman of 37 
Hayden St., Quincy, has been 
appointed the city's new 
Personnel Director by Mayor 
James A. Sheets. 

Fishman, 30, is currently 
Quincy's Benefits Coordinator, 
responsible for all aspects of 
employee health, dental and 
life insurance plans. 

Her appointment is 
effective Monday, Jan. 29. 
The term expires the first 
Monday of February, 1991. 

In her new $43,481 a year 
position, Fishman will 
process all personnel in 
Quincy. Her responsibilities 



include handling applications, 
retirements, grievances, 
retirements and employee 
compensation. 

Fishman is also in charge of 
making sure all Civil Service 
requirements are met and a 
person's Civil Service rights 
are protected. 

Sheets said he has not yet 
defined her role in the city's 
negotiations with municipal 
employees. 

"Some directors have 
become more involved in 
negotiations with unions and 
I'll be looking at her role in 
negotiations in the next week 



or two and define what that 
role will be in my administra- 
tion," the mayor said 
Tuesday. 

Most municipal contracts 
are up for negotiations in 
June. 

In announcing the 
appointment. Sheets spoke 
very highly of his newest 
department head. He also 
praised the work of outgoing 
Personnel Director David 
Smith. 

"We considered several 
people for that position. I was 
not dissatisfied with the job 



Action Expected Feb. 5 

Council Indicates 
Sewer User Fee 
Will Be Passed 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

A sewer user fee proposed by Mayor James A. Sheets will likely be approved 
by the City Council Monday, Feb. 5 and therefore apply to the last quarter of 
fiscal 1990. 



The fee. proposed by 
Mayor James A. Sheets, 
would raise approximately 
$9.5 million in FY 1991 to 
help offset a projected $14.6 
shortfall. 

With or without the fee. 
Sheets explained the city faces 
reductions in city services. If 
the fee is approved, there will 
probably be three percent cuts 
in all departments "across the 
board." 

If not supported, there will 
likely by 13.7 percent cuts in 
all departments. 

Based on discussions at two 
recent meetings of the City 
Council Ordinance Com- 
mitee. which is composed of 
all councillors, amended the 
fee to allow a 25 percent 
abatement for those eligible 
for a $500 real estate property 
tax abatement. 

The discount would only 
apply to property owners age 
70 and over who. if single, 
have an income of not more 
than $13,000 and have assets 
less than $28.(K)0. Forcouples 



age 70 or over, the reduction 
w () u I d apply only to 
twosomes making less than 
$15,000 with assets less than 
$.^0,000. 

According to Tax Collector 
Dana Childs. about 650 of the 
city's 23.000 property lax 
payers would be eligible for 
the abatement. 

The abatements would not 
apply to renters. 

Ward 3 Councillor 
suggested the abatement. He 
also recommended funding a 
water conservation program 
which the council endorsed. 
Councillors also suggested the 
School Committee initiate a 
water conservation program 
as part of the curriculum. 

Besides Nutley. Councillor- 
at-Large Tim Cahill voted 
against the abatement. They 
remarked that all citizens 
should share the burden of the 
new fee. Cahill also stated that 
those who receive a discount 
may be less apt to conserve 
water. 

The fee would be based on 



consumption; the more water 
used, the more people would 
pay and vice versa. 

I he consumption rate 
would be based on 70 percent 
of the water used in a 
particular household. In other 
words. 70 percent of the water 
used by a household would be 
charged as sewer water. 

The MWRA estimates that 
80 to 85 percent of household 
water flows into the sewer 
system. 

The fee is being advertised 
and councillors are seeking 
public comment. 

The Ordinance Committee 
will discuss the fee again next 
Monday at 7 p.m. 

According to City Clerk 
John Gillis. councillors can 
approve the fee by a simple 
majority vote at their next 
meeting Feb. 5. If approved 
Feb. 5. the fee will apply to the 
last three months of fiscal 
1990: April. May and June. 

As a result, a family of four 
would owe $62,25 for the last 
(Com 'ft on Pane 25) 



Board Suspends 

Restaurant On 
Fire Code Violations 



H itiii'tl I, It /'i 



'ilflr Jill 



By JANE ARENA 

Kelly's In The Square 
restaurant, 15 Cottage Ave., 
owned and operated by Peter 
Kelly, will have its license 
suspended for a period of five 
days because of fire code 
violations on the night of last 
Dec. 23, which jeopardized 
the public safety, according to 
License Board Chairman 
John Gillis. 

The five-day suspension 
will not be established until 
after a three-day appeals 
option period has passed, the 
board said. 

The hearing was called by 
the board after police and fire 
department reports cited 
alleged violations of both fire 
code and closing regulations. 
Fire Chief Paul O'Connell 
requested the hearing in a 
letter to the board Dec. 29. 

According to a report by 
Deputy Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman, fire alarms were 
sounded when dry powder fire 
extinguishers caused smoke 
detectors to activate in the 
building. 

When fire personnel 
arrived on the scene, the 
report stated, they found 
doors locked and an elevator 
locked in the basement 
position. They also found two 
female patrons drinking at the 



bar along with a bartender. 
The bartender, according to 
the police report, was 
drinking a bottle of beer. 

According to City fire 
regulations, all persons, not 
employed by the establish- 
ment, should be evacuated 
from the premises when a fire 
alarm sounds. 

According to city closing 
violations, all drinks must be 
off the bar by 1 :15 a.m. and all 
customers must be out of the 
establishment by 1:30 a.m. 
Quincy Liquor Inspector told 
the Board that the city's 
closing agreement had been 
signed by Mrs. Rosemary 
Kelly on Nov. 1, 1988. 

One of the patrons seen at 
the bar, Gigi Prete, spoke 
before the board Tuesday and 
explained she was sitting at 
the bar, at the invitation of the 
bartender, because she had 
hurt her knee while dancing. 
She also told the board that 
she was drinking grapefruit 
juice at the point in question. 
The second female, a friend of 
Prete's, was not drinking at 
the time either, she said. The 
woman asked not to be 
identified by the press. 

Mrs. Kelly, appearing 
before the board with her 
Atty., Richard Barry, told the 
Board that she was acting 



manager at Kelly's on the 
night in question because her 
husband was at home ill. 
Peter Kelly did not appear 
before the Board on Tuesday. 

She told the Board that fire 
extinguishers were set off by 
patrons of a party held in the 
basement of the establishment 
as a prank after the party. 

She said that at this time, 
about 1:30 a.m., employees 
were cleaning up the 
basement area after a party 
and that there were people 
employed by the band 
packing up equipment near 
the elevator. 

Kelly said she then went to 
the lobby area to speak with 
Deputy Fire Chief Gorman. 
She told the Board that, at 
that time, she was unaware 
that there were two customers 
still at the basement area bar. 

Board members, including 
Police Chief Francis Finn and 
Fire Chief Paul O'Connell, 
told Kelly that, as manager, it 
was her responsibility to gt 
all customers off the premises 
when an alarm sounded. 

Chief O'Connell also 
questioned Prete about her 
remaining at the bar during 
the alarm. She said she had 
explained to Gorman she 

(Conl'il on I'aftv ■'>) 



Pige 2 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 2S, I9M 



License Board Rules: 

Teenaee Dances Can Continue With Conditions 



By JANE ARENA 

The Aquarius Lounge at 
Quincy Bay Inn will be able to 
continue Friday night teenage 
dance parties as long as they 
follow conditions set Tuesday 
by the License Board. Board 
Chairman John Gillis said. 

The dances have been held 
there since November of 1989. 
1989. 



From now on the 
establishment must sell 
advance tickets to events 
likely to draw a larger crowd, 
including holidays, school 
vacations, and any event 
where there is to be live 
entertainment. The Board 
hopes that this will give the 
police department advance 
notice on when more detail 



officers should be assigned to 
the dances. 

The board had considered 
cancelling the teenage dances 
at Quincy Bay Inn after 
reports on two incidents there 
which involved police, one of 
which involved a youth seen 
with a gun. 

According to a report 
issued by Police Officer C. 



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PRESENTS: 



Coastal 
Concerns 




JAN. 30th 7-8 PM LIVE 

Rerun: Feb. 13th 7-8 p.m. 

Topic: 
"A Changing Quincy" 



With guests: Alicia Coletti,-Dir. of Pupil Personal, 
Quincy School Dept. 
Janet Ellis - City of Quincy, 
Affirmative Action 
Stan Nickel - Urbanistics 
Betty Yau - Norfolk County District 
Attorney's office. 

If you would like to call in with questions for our 
guests or would like to be in our studio audience 
call QCTV-3 at 471-9609. 






Middendorf, a fight broke out 
outside the establishment on 
the night of Jan. 13, which 
involved "approximately 20 
to 30 youths." The report 
states that the officer used 
mace to break up the fight and 
that no arrests were made. 

The incident also involved 
youths running and jumping 
on the roofs of cars in the 
parking lot, according to a 
letter by Sgt. Richard Laracy, 
City Liquor Inspector, which 
accompanied the police 
report. 

TTie other detail officer on 
duty Jan. 13, William 
Lannergan, was before the 
board Tuesday and told the 
board that police assistance 
had been called for, but that 
the youths dispersed as soon 
as they heard police sirens. 
Further assistance was 
cancelled after the first cruiser 
arrived on the scene, he said. 

Officer Middendorf also 
wrote the report on an 
incident Nov. 24, 1989, which 
involved a black youth seen 
with a gun and another black 
youth reported as having a 
gun. No arrests were made on 
this night either, the report 
stated. 

Both Sgt. Laracy and 
Officer Lannergan told the 
board that the fights were 
"not racially motivated." 

Kevin Nacar, Vice 
President of Operations for 
the Quincy Bay Inn, spoke to 
the Board on Tuesday. 

He explained that for 
Friday night teenage dances. 



his staff is comprised of three 
managers, ten male fioor 
people, three female fioor 
people, three bartenders for 
the soda and juice bar, and 
two to three detail police 
officers, depending on the size 
of the crowd. He also outlined 
procedures implemented after 
the November incident. 

He told the board that, as 
they enter, each patron is 
checked by a metal detector. 
The metal detector has not 
caught anything, he said. The 
group is split into two lines 
and undergoes a "pat down 
search" by either a male or 
female door person before 
being admitted to the club. 

Nacar told the board that 
the youths have no objections 
to the procedure. 

He also told the board that 
there are sometimes small 
lines outside the establish- 
ment before a dance, but that 
they are never oversold. 

Although the legal capacity 
for the establishment is 500. 
Nacar, by choice, has limited 
the number to 400 for all 
teenage dances. He said he has 
only reached that limit once. 

Nacar also told the board 
that the incidents in question 
were not racially motivated. 

"Sometimes, with 300 or 
400 people, there are three or 
four trouble-makers," he said. 

Fire Chief Paul O'Connell 
noted that recent violence at a 
teenage dance at Vincents in 
Randolph erupted because a 
line of some 800 youths were 
turned away at the door. 



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Teenage dances at Vincents 
have since been cancelled. 

O'Connell suggested that 
Nacar sell advanced tickets to 
the dances so that there will be 
no reason for kids to wait in 
line before the dance. 

Nacar said that there is 
never a line outside the Quincy 
Bay Inn because there is no 
fear that they will not be 
admitted. 

The problems, Nacar said, 
occur after the dances when 
kids go outside to wait for 
rides or cabs home. 

Nacar said that the 
management has already 
implemented methods for 
filtering customers out slowly 
after the dance. He said a 
dance contest is held at 1 1 
p.m. and some leave at that 
point, and that slower music is 
played toward the end of the 
night and some customers 
leave then. 

He added the club also has 
a strict no re-admittance 
policy. Once someone leaves, 
they are not allowed back 
inside, he said. 

Police Chief Francis Finn 
told Nacar that he does not 
want the dances advertised 
outside the Quincy area. 

"I am not saying that 
Quincy kids are any better 
than Boston kids," Chief Finn 
said, adding that there may be 
less inclination for youths to 
fight when everyone in 
attendance is from Quincy. 

Although Nacar said he 
does not advertise the dances, 
Sgt. Laracy noted that they 
are mentioned on a Boston 
radio station. Nacar 
explained that this is because 
a radio D.J. appears at the 
dances. He said he does not 
want to advertise. 

Both Sgt. Laracy and 
Officer Lannergan suggested 
that more police presence 
should be at the dances when 
larger crowds attend. 

In an effort to monitor the 
crowd size in advance, the 
board asked that advanced 
ticket sales be conducted for 
those events expected to 
attract more kids, including 
holidays, school vacation 
time, and any time there is live 
entertainment. When a crowd 
of over 300 people is expected, 
Gillis said, a third detail police 
officer will be hired for inside 



Retail Customers Only Expires 1/31/90 

471-8787 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
rout*. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




^ .comes 
, to insurance we 
keep good 

companies 

We represent many fine insurance 
companies. And we select the company 
we think can best suit ^our insurance 
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car, your home or your business. 



For insurance with an independent 
point of vievy. give us a call. 



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685 HAMCOCK STREET, QUINCY 

479-5500 



»? WESTON ST 9 MAIN ST 

894-1214 528-5200 




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940 MAIN ST 

668-2900 



Thursday, January 2S, 1990 Quincy Sun Pa|c 3 



Fund Established For 
Houghs Neck Family 
Left Homeless By Fire 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The Mellyn family of 
Houghs Neck, left homeless 
af'er a three-alarm fire gutted 
their home last Friday, has 
found temporary housing and 
will rebuild on site, a family 
friend said Monday. 

The fire at 26 Bay View 
Ave. started at 10:15 a.m. 
after a clothes dryer located 
on the first floor apparently 
malfunctioned. The bla/e 
spread quickly into the second 
floor and attic, gutting most 
of the two-and-one-half story 
structure. 

To help the family, a 
Mellyn Family Relief Fund 
has been established at 
Quincy Savings Bank. 
Anyone wishing to contribute 
can by visiting the main office 
at 1200 Hancock St., Quincy. 
Donations can also be sent 
through the mail. 

Deputy Fire Chief Joseph 
Walsh estimated damage in 
the fire at $175,000. 

Norma Mellyn, who lived 
in the two-story seaside home 
with her husband, Arthur, 
and five of their seven chidren 
was at home with an elderly 
relative with the fire started. 
She telephoned firefighters 
and left the house, Walsh said. 
Arthur Mellyn had lived in 
the house all his life. His 
father bought the house in 
1929. It was insured. 

The Mellyns and five of 
their seven children lived in 
the house: Su/anne, 32, 
Kevin, 31, Nancy, 23, Peter, 
21. and David, 17. Daughter 
Debbie Vecchione, 24, lives in 



Elementary 
School Menu 



Jan. 29- Feb. 2 

M«m: Italian pi//a with 
mo//arclla and chcddar 
cheese, fruit juice, chocolate 
chip cookie, milk. 

Tues: NO I INCH 

Wed: Sloppv .loc on a roll. 
green beans. Ircsh banana, 
milk. 

Thurs: lurkcx fricassee, 
mashed potato, p e u s . 
eranberrs sauce. Ircsh baked 
wheal roll. milk. 

Fri: lish nuiiiicts with tater 
tOis. Iriiil cup. fresh baked 
wheal roll. milk. 



Secondary 
School Menu 



Jan. 29-Feb 2 

Mon: Italian pi//a with 
tomato sauce topping, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Kentucky style 
chicken, mashed potato, 
sliced carrot, cranberrx sauce, 
fresh baked wheat roll. milk. 

Wed: .American chop suey. 
green peas, fresh baked wheal 
roll, fresh apple, milk. 

Thurs: Barbeque chicken, 
mashed potato, corn, fresh 
baked wheal roll. milk. 

Fri: B;iked lasagna with 
meat sauce, green beans, fresh 
baked Italian roll, jello. milk. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«r«'s ■ chance to earn 
eilra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Quincy and another daughter, 
Kathy Mitchell, 29, lives in 
Bridgewater. 

Nancy Mellyn is a full-time 
teller at Quincy .Savings Bank. 
The fund was set up by co- 
workers. 

On Monday, a family 
friend said the Mellyns had 
found temporary housing 
over the weekend. The family 
was expected to move into a 
mobile home on their 
property at 26 Bay View Ave. 
later this week. 

The Mellyns are also 
planning to rebuild a home on 
their property, the friend said. 

For now, the family is 
trying to overcome their loss 
and plan their future. 

"I think they are still in 
shock. It is devastating to lose 
everything in the matter of an 
hour or two," the friend said. 

Captain David Usher and 
10 firefighters received minor 
injuries and were treated at 
Quincy Hospital and later 
released. Usher experienced 
chest pains. 

The first alarm sounded at 
10:17 a.m. and second and 
third alarms were struck 
shortly after firefighters 
arrived. Some 15 pieces of 



equipment, including seven 
engines, five ladder trucks and 
one tower responded. 

The all clear was sounded at 
12:26 p.m. 

The first firefighters to 
arrive found little smoke or 
fire showing, but it suddenly 
"fiashed" and spread rapidly, 
Walsh said. At one point, 
firefighters were ordered off 
the roof when it showed signs 
of weakening. 

Strong winds and the steep 
grade leading to Quincy Bay 
at the rear of the house made 
fighting the fire more difficult. 
Because of the steep grade and 
drop, firefighters could attack 
the blaze on only three sides. 

Fire hoses were placed 
between the burning building 
and nearby homes located 
within 30 feet of the building 
as a precaution. 

The blaze was under 
control in about 90 minutes. 

In addition to Usher, these 
firefighters were injured, 
treated and released: Russell 
Patton, Ted Johnson, 
Edward Nardone, Steve 
Shaw, Donald Reddington, 
William Barron, John 
Jackson, Theodore Rouillard, 
Michael Davis and Gerald 
McCourt. 




A I • I' K I '^ I I) I \ I s • r I \ I I 



A special place in Downtown 

Quincy warmly welcomes its 

new retail tenant 




The 
. M Boston 
V«>' Five 

Experience, the difference. 

PRESIDENTS PLACE 

Hancock and Washington Streets 

Downtown Quincy 



I TWO PLAIN SHIRTS 
! LAUNDERED FREE 

j (with 2uiy suit cleaned at regular price.) 




Incoming orders only. 
Coupon must accompany 
your order. 

Not good in comk>ination 
with other offers. 
Expires: Feb. 10, 1990 



Quincy, Lakin Sq., 581 Adams St. - Wollaston, 624 Hancock St. 
So. Oulncy, 320 Quincy Ave. - East Milton, 338 Granite Ave. 




DEI'l TY I- IRK C HIKK Joseph Jackson, left, and Capt. Frank Sullivan, confer during a three- 
alarm fire which gutted a two-and-a-half story family home at 26 Bayview Ave., Houghs Neck, 
last I- riday . The bla^e, which started in a clothes dryer, left seven people homeless and injured 1 1 
firefighters including Jackson's son, John, who suffered facial burns when he was caught in a 
flashover. 

((Jiiiniy Sun /iholn lis 1 inn (inriiiiml 

Postage Stamps Available 
At Quincy Stores 



For the convenience of 
postal customers living and 
working in Quincy, postage 
stamps are available for 
purchase at various local 
stores. 

This is a joint venture 
between local businesses and 
the post office under the U.S. 



Postal .Service's Stamps on 
Consignment program, an 
effort to make postal retail 
services more convenient for 
customer use. 

Quincy stores with stamps 
available at no extra charge 
include: Seven Eleven at 678 
Quincy St., 76 Franklin St. 



and 75 Copeland St.; Stop & 
Shop at 141 Newport Ave. 
and 495 Southern Artery; 
Osco Drug at 132 Granite St.; 
Chutney's at Quincy Bay 
Marina; Business & Mail 
Services at 31 Temple St. and 
Robert's Hallmark at 19Beale 
St. 



A Community Loan Fund 
for Investors? 




We offer preferred 

rates and terms for residential, 

income producing properties located in 

Quincy, Braintree, and Weymouth. 

3 YEAR 

Adjustable Rate Mortgage 



10.625 

25 YEAR MORTGAGE 



% 



No Application Fee, No Credit Report Fee, 
No Appraisal Fee 

Because we want to help our communities grow 
and prosper, we have established a $20,000,000 
Community Loan Fund with special rates and terms 
for investors who are considering the purchase or 
refinancing of residential, income-producing proper- 
ties of up to 20 units located in Quincy, Braintree, 
and Weymouth. 

We are your community bank, and this is just 
one of the ways we are making it happen. For more 
information about the Community Loan Fund, come 
in today or call Dennis Myers at (617) 479-2265. 

The Wbemia Savings Bank 

W^ soy "Yesf 

■^31 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA (617) 47^-2265 

101 Federal Street, Boston, MA (617) 345-0441 

51 Commercial Street, Braintree, MA (617) 848-5560 

Member FDIC DIFM 



Pifc 4 Quincy Sun ThurMlajr. January 2S, 199* 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 
Jane C Arena. Assistant Editor 

25« per copy, $11 00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Quincy, $15 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass. 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 



The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility tor 
typographical errors m advenisements but *ill reprint that 
part o( an advertisement m which the typographical error 
occurs 



'A^Jfe- 



Regulations Issued 

Against Employee 

Intoxication In 

Liquor Places 



The Quincy License Board 
Tue-:day adopted a formal 
regulation against employees 
){ a liquor establishment 
being intoxicated while on 
duty. 

The action came after a 
recommendation by O^'ncy 
Liquor Inspector .Richard 
Laracy in a letter to the Board 
Jan. 23. 

In his letter, Laracy pointed 
out that no state statute exists 
making it a violation for 
bartenders or waitresses to be 
intoxicated while on duty. 

Laracy also noted that 
"licensing boards may 
promulgate regulations 
regarding conduct of licensed 
businesses, including drinking 
by employees." 

Laracy based his recom- 
mendation on an action taken 
last year by the state 
Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Commission (A.B.C.C). The 
action overturned a three-day 
suspension of a license of a 
bar in Winchendon, MA 
because the bartender on duty 
was intoxicated. 



Legally 
Yours 



.Adrienne Clarke 

Coordinator 

Nurfulk County Bar Assn. 

Lawyer Referral Service • 471-969.^ 




this Iraliin- fiKitsi-s nii tiursiiinis mnsi jri'if\ii-iitl\ 
aski'd h\ i-iillrrs unit k ill ^<• ansin-ri'tl h\ inrimis iiiftiihiTs 
nj ihi' \nrlnlk (.niilllv liur \ssii. 

Q. II I am aricsicd for opcraiint! under ihc inllucncc ol 
alcohol do I auiomalically losc m\ liccnM.-' 

A. Alter boiiii! .iircsicd lor O.l .1. \\ sou lake a brealh lesl 
and score a reading; ol . I(t or abose, then the eoiin will 
lake \oui lieen^e loi a period ol 90 da\s ai \iiiii 
arraiiinmenl. II \iiu lelusc to lake ihe breath test, ihe 
arrcsiiiii! police department will nolily the Rei;istr\ nl 
Motor Vehicles ol \oiir refusal to lake the icsi I he 
Rciiisiry vmII then suspend your license Inr I2(» davs lor 
leliising the brealh test. 

0- What is IM IV in .uiio insurance and what is the leeeni 
ehanjie in IM.IV benelits' 

.\. IM. I*, stands lor pers»>nul iniurv protection. Ihesearent)- 
laull bcnelits paid to you and those injured or killed in 
auloaeeidents. I here are three kindsof benefits which are 
eumpensaled: 

\. Medical I \pcnses 

2. I t)st Wales dp to 75', » 

3. Replacement services (i.e Household) 

llic benelil h;is been increased Irom S2.0<)« to SX.()(M> 

This Hcek"s guest attorney is .lohn DeVilo who is in private 
practice in hedham - 326-1818. He is aisu sUfTatturney uf the 
Nurf«*lk (uunly Bar Advocates. 



.\lthougn tne aeasion said 
that individual licensing 
boards may adopt regulations 
against bartenders and other 
employees being intoxicated 
while on duty, the suspension 
was overturned because the 
town of Winchendon does not 
have such a regulation. 

In his letter, Laracy said 
that "there has been one 
occasion in Quincy where I 
have warned a bartender that 
if I catch him intoxicated on 
duty again 1 will take the 
establishment before the 
Licensing Board." The letter 
did not name the establish- 
ment. 

"I would like to recommend 
to the Board," the letter 
continues, "that any employee 
of a licensed liquor 
establishment who is actively 
involved in serving alcohol to 
the public and is intoxicated 
while on duty is in violation of 
License Board regulations." 

The Board adopted the 
regulation and will issue a 
memorandum to that effect, 
said Board Chairman John 
GiUis. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Quincy's 'Ward 7' 



Dedham may be the Norfolk County seat but 
sometimes you can't help thinking of it as Quincy's 
Ward 7. 

Politically speaking, that is. 

Most of the top county offices are now held by 
Quincy residents. Like: 

Dist. Atty. William Delahunt, Sheriff Clifford 
Marshall, Commissioner Mary Collins, Treasurer 
Daniel Raymondi. Register of Probate Thomas Hughes 
and Clerk of Courts Nicholas Barbadaro. 

All are Democrats. 

So. young man, move to Quincy and become a 
Democrat if you're thinking of running for a Norfolk 
County office. 

D 

QL'ICK NOW. WHO was Quincy's all-time top 
municipal \ote getter'.' 

If you said Amelio Delia Chiesa 
you would be wrong. But if you said 
James Mcintyre you would be right. 

Delia Chiesa actually ranks sixth 
among candidates for Quincy 
municipal office who polled over 
20,000 votes. 

Mcintyre led the parade with 
22.034 votes he piled up in 1965 running for mayor 
against Joseph LaRaia who got 7,713. 





DJERF 



MclNTYRE 



That was the year Delia Chiesa 
retired after serving as mayor for 12 
years - eight under Plan A and four 
under Plan E. 

Runnerup to Mcintyre in the vote- 
getting department was Dr. Charles 
Djerf who twice rang up over 2 1 ,000 
votes running for School Committee. 
In 1965 he hit 21.852. In 1961 he 
had 21.686. 

Third place honors go to Paul 
Harold who as a city councillor at- 
large candidate in 1977 polled 21.243 
votes. 

In fourth place is George Burke 
with 20.741 running for councillor 
at-large in 1965. 

Behind him is Arthur Tobin with 
20.453 votes as a councillor at-large 
candidate in 1975. 

Delia Chiesa is the only other 

20.000 Vote Club member with 

.20.131 when he defeated Joseph 

Brett for mayor in 1961. Brett had 

8,619. 






The spoked wheel, historians estimate, was invented 
around 2000 B.C. 




You're co vered 

By Gall Oann 
Riley & RIeliy Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 



I 






ONLY AN INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL 
SHOULD PLAN YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS 

With the cost of homes and personal belongings 
escalating at such a tremendous rate today, the average 
person may find it almost impossible to ensure that his 
worldly assets are adequately protected in the event 
disaster strikes 

For example, homeowners should consider all options 
Do you need or want standard insurance which provides 
broad coverage for your home and its contents against a 
wide range of specified exposures? Or would you be more 
confident with a comprehensive, all-risk policy which 
protects against all physical damage except for specific 
exclusions? And what about special options? Extended 
coveragss? Or home or contents replacement 
guarantees? 

We suggest that you sit down with a professional who 
can give you precisely the right type and amount of 
insurance protection you need to fit your budget 

If you are considering protection get in touch with the 
insurance professionals at RH«y A Rielly Inauranc* 
Agency, Inc. Please visit our office at 1050 Hancock StrMt 
In Ouincy or give us a call at 471-6200. 




BARBARA FONTAIM . wile of WJDA news editor. 
Herb I onlainc. faces a long 
rehabilitation period and possible 
surgery lor injuries suffered last week ^^^ -fW^^'S 
when she and the family poodle. Pierre, 
were struck by a speeding car vvhile 
crossing at a light on Quincy Shore Drive 
near Caddy F'ark. 

Barbara sutlered si\ fractures under BARBARA 
her right knee and other injuries. Pierre was killed instantK. 

"If Barbara had been in the exact spot that Pierre was in. she 
would have been the one killed." I ontaine said. 

He and Barbara are heartbroken over Pierre's death. 

"He was like a member of the family." I ontaine says 

Barbara. 1 oniaine says, lay 10 minutes alongside the road, 
calling lor help alter the 6:.^0 a.m. accident, belorc someone 
came to her aid. 

Fontaine was broadcasting the news at VV.ID.A when he 
heard about the accident on a police scanner. He put it on the 
air nol realizing the woman hit was his wile. 

He learned a hall-hour later when he received a telephone 
call from Quincy Hospital where Barbara had been taken bv 
ambulance. 

The driver, a 22-year-old Lawrence man was cited lor 
excessive speeding, operating to endanger, failing to stop tor a 
pedestrian and disregard of a tralTic control signal. 

He has an appearance coming up in Quincv District COurl. 

D 

ERNEST ARISTIDE of the Quincy Tourism 
Council and his wife. Peg, like to go to Cambridge now 
and then to attend Mass at St. Paul's Church in 
Harvard Sq. 

Ihe church's huge stained glass windows and the 
interior with its columns of marble take on the 
appearance of a cathedral, they note. 

But most impressive, they say. is the tact that those in 
the last row of pev\s receive Holy Communion first and 
those in the front row receive last. 

And those familiar words, they say. come to mind: 
"He who is last shall be first." 

Recreation Dept 

To Conduct 
Ceramic Classes 



Ihe Quincy Recreation 
Department has a limited 
number ol openings lor its 
winter session of instructional 
ceramic classes. 

Ihis program is open to 
boys and girls age eight 
through middle school who 
are residents of Quincy. Basic 
and intermediate instruction 
in painting, gla/ing. staining, 
and cleaning of ceramic 
greenware are included in this 
program. 

Ihe program will be 
conducted at the Dawes 
Memorial Instate located on 
the corner of Channing St. 
and Quincy Shore Dr. 
(opposite Squantum Yacht 
Club). 



Classes are held: 

• Monday: .^ to 4:.^() p.m. 

• Wednesday : .^-4:.^() p.m. 

• Saturday: Iwo Classes - 
8:.^()a.m.to lOa.m.; lOa.m.lo 
Ih.^Oa.m, 

Registration is done at the 
class location beginning 
Saturday. .Ian. 27. Mondav. 
Jan. 2*Jand Wednesdav. .Ian. 
.11 at the regular schedule time 
of the classes. Registration 
will continue as long as 
openings exist. 

Ihe program runs lor 10 
weeks and the cost is $10. 

Additional information can 
be obtained by calling the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment at 77.VI3KO, ext. 204. 




Quincy 
Pound ^ 
Adoptables ^ 




IJkT« 



Shepherd-cross female. 5 months, black l;in, vcrv 

Incndly. would be good pet lor child.vn. 
Small lerricr male. M; years, long tan coal. 
Setter Bcaglc-mi.x. female, black, I year 
Setter-cross male, black white, long coat. 2 years 
Labrador female, black with a little white, I year 
Small Shepherd-cross, black tan, smooth coat. 

screw type tail, choke collar 

Collie lab-mi.\ male. 2 years, black white. 

smooth coat 

Cat, brown angora tiger, fluffy tail. Ilea collar. 

found in South Quincy 

C untact OfricK Phyllis Brrlucchi and Bruce DiBella. 

773-6297, daily hours. 8:30 am-4:30 pm 

Except Sundays 



Thursday, January 25, 1990 Quincy Sun Pace S 



MDC Hopes To Reop 
Caddy Park Gates 



en 



The Metropolitan District 
Commission is hoping to 
reopen the gates to Caddy 

Memorial Park at the 
Wollaston Beach Reservation 
in the spring but the state's 
fiscal troubles may prevent it, 
an MDC spokesperson said 
Tuesday. 

The gates have been closed 
and locked this winter 
because of budget cuts. 
Because the MDC was unable 
to hire skating rink 
employees, the agency 
transferred its reservation 
officers to the rinks. As a 
result, all gates leading to 
MDC parks were closed and 
locked earlier this winter. 

According to MDC 



Spokesperson Leanne 
DelVecchio, the agency could 
be cut by 18 percent in fiscal 
1991 which begins this July 1. 
Therefore, the fate of the gates 
is unknown. 

"We're hopeful to open (the 
gates) in the spring but we 
can't make that promise 
because our budget could be 
cut by 18 percent," she said. 

Although the gates 
are locked, DelVecchio said 
the parks are still open for 
recreational purposes. 
"People are still welcome to 
walk on the reservations." 

Last week, Quincy State 
Representative Michael 
Morrissey contacted MDC 
Commissioner Illyas Bhatti 
inquiring why the gates to 



Caddy Memorial Park have 
been closed and locked this 
winter. 

"While the closing may be 
due to budget cuts, there are 
other parks under the MDC 
jurisdiction that have not 
been closed," Morrissey said. 

However, DelVecchio 
refuted this claim, saying the 
gates to every MDC park 
have been locked while the 
areas have been kept open. 

In his letter to Bhatti, 
Morrissey asked the 
commissioner to open the 
gates at least on a part-time 
basis during the day and 
weekends for the residents of 
Quincy and the surrounding 
areas to enjoy. 

The representative stated 



many area residents enjoy the 
park and the walk way in the 
Wollaston area. "I have been 
a supporter of the M.D.C. 
over the years because they 
have provided valuable 
services to my constituents," 
Morrissey wrote. 

"Caddy Park will give local 
residents access to Black's 
Creek and the jogging path 
between Fenno St. and 
Furnace Brook Parkway, if it 
proves to be a safety hazard, 
this should be the only reason 
that the park should be 
closed," he added. 

DelVecchio said the 
commissioner may grant this 
request. At press time, Bhatti 
was drafting his response to 
Morrissey. 



The Montclair Men's Club 
Slips Quietly Into History 



(I'.onl'tl from Pai(v I) 

Johnny Pesky, Bob Feller, 
Bobby Doerr, Tommy 
Collins, Ellis Kinder, Mike 
Holovak. Dick Donovan, Bill 
Sharman, Harold Connolly, 
Pete Runnels, Frank 
Malzone, Jack Donahue, Jim 
Colclough. Bob Dee, Butch 
Songin, Munroe MacLean, 
Sam Mele, Dick Radatz, Bill 
Sullivan, Gino Cappelletti, 
Joe Foss, Carl Leone. Jim 
Nance, Ken Coleman, Nick 
Buoniconti, Bill Veeck, Rico 
Petrocelli, Carl Garrett, Joe 
Kapp, Upton Bell, Milt 
Schmidt, Dick Koch, Mack 
Herron, Tom Currier, Max 
Zides, Dick O'Connell, Bob 
Montgomery, Tommy 
McCarthy, Chuck Fairbanks, 
Curt Gowdy, John Havlicek, 
Bobby Orr, Ken Harrelson, 
Marvelous Marvin Hagler, 
and Billv Sullivan. 

Did the honor mean much 
to them? Well, of the 61 



honorees, only three were 
unable to attend. 

The Montclair Men's Club 
began with men playing 
baseball at Bishops Field and 
as a baseball team in the Park 
League. Those associated 
with the team rented the 
Montclair Improvement 
Association building for 
meetings and decided to call 
their organization the 
Montclair Men's Club. 

That organization started 
Sept. 12, 1946 and received its 
charter Sept. 24, 1947- 
almost a year later. 

The latter date is the club's 
official beginning and 
Matthew Smith became the 
first official president, serving 
1947-48. He was succeeded by 
Gildea in 1949. 

The other presidents: 

Frederick Farrell, Daniel 
Haley, James Kelley, Sr., 
Richard Post, John White, 
Gordon Paige, George Hayes. 



Sr., Dana Valencia, Edward 
Middendorf, William Rendle. 
Jr., Leo Santoro, Raymond 
Cunningham. Andrew 
Orrock. Edward Adams, 
James Locke, Joseph 
MacGillvray, George Hatfield. 
Sr.. William Walter 
Berezniewicz. Leo Doyle, 
Stanley Kovalski, Sr., Stanley 
Kovalski. Jr. and Stanley 
Kogut. 

The charter members of the 
club were: 

John LeRoy, honorary 
president; Matthew Smith, 
first official president; John 
Ardini, vice president; 
Thomas McPartlin, treasurer; 
Philip O'Donnell, recording 
secretary; William O'Donnell, 
financial secretary; Grover 
Clark, sergeant at-arms, 
Joseph Gildea. Edward 
Barton and Paul Mclver. 
trustees. 

The preamble of the club's 
charter said what the club was 



all about: 

"Recognizing the need of a 
progressive group of men in 
our community and without 
regard to race or creed, we 
dedicate our organization to 
sponsoring interest in various 
social activities and to the 
promotion of civic interests. 

"It is our intention to 
concern ourselves with 
recreational activities of the 
youngsters, to organize get- 
togethers and sports events 
and to take part in civic affairs 
and any other programs that 
will improve our community. 

"Believing that our 
individual and joint purpose 
are one and the same, we have 
united ourselves into one 
representative group to 
promote our objectives." 

And for 42 years, they did it 
well. 

The club may be gone but 
their deeds will be remem- 
bered. 



Board Suspends Restaurant 
On Fire Code Violations 



(C.onl'il from I'a/cv ll 

remained at the bar because 
she had injured her knee. 

O'Connell noted that there 
was no mention of this in 
Gorman's official report. He 
noted that, according to usual 
procedure, Gorman should 
have offered city services to 
her because she was injured. 
Prete said services were not 
offered. 

Prete also told O'Connell 
she remained at the bar 
because the bartender told 
her, "don't worry," indicating 
that alarms were often set off 
and that there was no fire. 

"It was poor judgement on 
my part (to stay)," she told the 
board, "but the bartender 



basically said 'don't worry.' " 
O'Connell. noting that this 
attitude toward alarms is an 
ail-too common occurrence in 
the city, said. "I wish I could 
tell my men 'don't worry'. . . I've 
been to too many 'don't 
worries.' " 

O'Connell maintained that 
during an alarm, all 
customers must be im- 
mediately removed from the 
establishment. 

In relation to the closing 
violation. Police Chief 
Francis Finn noted that the 
practice of a bartender 
drinking after hours, "is 
certainly not condoned" but 
"happens traditionally." 

He said the department is 



more concerned that 
bartenders are not drinking 
during the course of the 

evening as it could impair 
judgement about customer 
age and intoxication. 
(Directly after the hearing on 
Kelly's, the board voted to 
adopt a regulation making it a 

license violation for an 
employee to be intoxicated 
while on duty.) 

Sgt. Laracy said that he was 
mainly concerned with the 
two customers seen with 
drinks at the bar, and told the 
board that violations had 
been broken regardless of 

whether the drinks were 
alcoholic. 



"I am not calling (Prete) a 
liar," he said, "but the 
regulation states that all 
drinks must be removed from 
the bar... and that would 
include grapefruit juice." 

While Police Chief Finn 
said he would agree to only a 
reprimand concerning the 
liquor violations, O'Connell 
strongly urged a license 
suspension for the fire code 
violation. Finn agreed. 

The board agreed to 
suspend Kelly's license for a 
period of five days. 

Kelly will have the 
opportunity to appeal the 
decision before the five days 
are named. 







For Your Comenience 

A New Location For: 

South Shore 

Evening Medical Care 

500 Congress Street 3-C 

Crown Colony Park • Quincy, MA 02169 

(617) 773-2600 

Reasonable Fees • Qualified Physicians 

• Insurance Accepted • Adolescent and Adult Medicine 

• Walk In Service • Courtesy Blood Pressure Friday Evenings 

• No Appointment Necessary • Cholesterol Screening 

HOURS: Monday thru Friday: 6 PM - 9 PM; Saturday: 9 AM - 4 PM 
South Shore Evening Medical Care was formerly located at 21 School Street, Quincy 

, A Medical Association of Quincy Inc. Affiliate 

\ , • — ^— — ^^_^^^^»^^— 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



Jan. 25-31 
1963 



3 Prime Sites 

For Industrial 

Development 

City Planning Director James E. Lee. speaking 
before the City Council's special Committee on 
Shipbuilding and Industrial Development, cited three 
locations in Quincy as prime ____^^____^_^_^^^ 
sites for potential industry. 

They were land in West 
Quincy owned by Granite 
manufacturer Peter G. 
Ruscitto, the former Naval Air (y— yr a 

Station in Squantum. and land ^^ learsA^O 
to the rear of the new Patriot mmmtmmm^i^m^^i^ 
Ledger plant in South Quincy. 

He also listed si.x locations for possible high rise 
apartment development, including; 

Clay St. or the Wollaston parking area. Quarry Hill 
in West QuincN, Morrissey Boulevard and Sea St. land 
across the street from Central Junior High School. Pine 
Hill off Willard St. in West Quincy. and the old 
Squantum Naval Air Station. 

YARD PLANS LOWER BIDS 

Daniel D. Strohmeier. vice president in charge of the 
Bethlehem Steel Co.'s shipyard division, said changes 
are being planned at Fore River to increase production 
and cut costs to meet competition. 

Strohmeier's disclosure came in the wake of 
comments by San. Leverett Saltonstall (R-Mass)that 
"Quincy Fore Ri\er Shipyard is pricing its bids too high 
in the competitive shipbuilding market." 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Pfc Kenneth B. Eaves of 282 Wilson Ave., Wollaston, 
a helicopter gunner, was awarded the Distinguished 
Flying Cross for heroism during the battle of Ap Bac in 
Vietnam in which he was shot down twice ... Mayor 
Amelio Delia Chiesa testified in favor of a bill by Sen. 
John E. Powers (D- South Boston) to build a bridge or a 
causeway from Thompson's Island to Chapel Rock, 
-Squantum ... Bob DeBoer scored /9point.s to lead the 
North Quincy High School basketball team to a 62-55 
victory over Medlord in a Greater Boston League game 
... The roast beef dinner, including appeti/er, salad, 
potatoes, vegetable, beverage and dessert, was $3. 50 at 
Sherry's Restaurant. 579 Southern Artery ... Costanzo 
Pagnano. 73, announced that he will seek a fourth term 
as president of the Granite Cutters International 
Association of America ... Charles Caradonna, 69. of 
218 Federal Ave.. South Quincy. who operated a news 
and fruit stand in Quincy Center for 40 years, died at 
City Hospital ... Greenville. III.. College eliminated 
Eastern Na/arene College from the Malone Basketball 
Tournament in Canton. Ohio, by a score of 80-79 ... 
THe Rev. Horace O. Tatum announced his retirement, 
effective May I. after 24 years as pastor of the 
Wollaston Baptist Church ... Folk singer Bob Riley and 
the Magic Trumpet of Lou Columbo were featured at 
the Beachcomber on Wollaston Boulevard ... Mrs. 
Edna B. Austin was named chairman of the Hospital 
Board of Managers, succeeding Paul E. Hurley who 
resigned ... Mrs. Frank N. Grossman was elected 
deaconess emeritus at the annual meeting of the First 
Church of Squantum ... Sirloin steak was 79 cents a 
-pound at Ro.xie's, 479 Southern Artery ... John T. 
Howland, state deputy of the Knights of Columbus, 
presided at the dedication of the new S85.0OO North 
Quincy K of C bungalow ... Mayor Delia Chiesa was 
readying a $24,763,507 budget for presentation to the 
City Council, indicated a $5.50 increase in last year's 
$82.80 ta.\ rate ... Reginald Reed, district airport 
engineer for the FAA in New England, called for 
establishment of a municipal airport to serve Quincy. 
Braintree, Weymouth and Hingham ... Perley E. 
Barbour, 83. of 28 Glendale Rd.. Quincy Center, mayor 
of Quincy in 1925-26. was a patient at City Hospital ... 
Pete Mariano had 23 points but Quincy's basketball 
team lost to Archbishop Williams. 64-49 in a non- 
league game ... Dr. Robert A. East, author of the 
recently published "John Quincy Adams - The Critical 
Years. 1 785- 1 794." spoke at the Rotary luncheon in the 
Neighborhood Club ... Sam Mele. manager of the 
Minnesota Twins, and White So.x pitcher Dick 
Donovan were honored at a testimonial ... William F. 
Fit/gerald of 52 Russei; St.. North Quincy. was 
confirmed as a member of the State Board of Elevator 
Appeals ... Anthony Quinn was starring in "Barabbas" 
at the Wollaston Theater on Beale St.. off Hancock ... 
City Councillor David S. Mcintosh said he will seek a 
waiver to allow Cit\ Historian William C. Edwards to 
remain on the job after 70. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thuraday, January 2S, I9M 




Chinese New Year 
4488 Being Celebrated 



THE NORTH QUINCY High School Asian-American Club recently presented a check for 
SIOO to Father Bill's Place. Shown from left are Tram Dieu, vice president; IVIong Chiu, 
secretary; Ms. Mary Jo Dion, Father Bill's Place, Lai Fai Lee, president; Sue Ng, treasurer; and 
Mr. Peter J. Chrisom, principal. 

Medical Decisions Workshop 
At United First Parish 



On Wednesday. Jan. 24, 
at 7:30, Dr. David Clarke 
will lead a two-hour dis- 
cussion on ethical, financial 
and legal questions arising 
from advancing medical 
technology. 

The workshop will be 
held in the Parish Hall at 
United First Parish Church, 
"Church of the Presidents," 
At 1306 Hancock St., in 
Quincy center. 

Topics will include ac- 
cess to health care, in- 
dividual's rights and obli- 



gations in health care de- 
cisions, distribution ofiimited 
health care resources, 
and appropriate use of 
medical technology. 

Dr. Clarke is a Unitarian 
Universalist minister and 
an attorney with a public 
health degree. He is Dir- 
ector of "Massachusetts 
Health Decisions", which 
is a project sponsored by 
the Massachusetts Health 
Research Institute. 

The program will inc- 
lude videotaped drama- 



tizations of real-life situ- 
ations and dilemmas, open 
discussion, and particip- 
ation in a personal opinion 
survey. Hundreds of sim- 
iliar workshops are being 
held throughout the Great- 
er Boston Area planning 
to involve six thousand 
people in direct citizen 
dialogue. Results of the 
surveys will be shared 
with health care providers, 
administrators, public policy 
makers, legislators, and the 
public. 



The Chinese Year of the 
Horse 4488 which begins 
Saturday, is already being 
celebrated in Quincy Public 
Schools by students and 
teachers. 

Through grants from the 
Massachusetts Council on the 
Arts and Humanities and the 
Quincy Arts Lottery Council, 
the Chinese Culture Institute 
is bringing cultural programs 
to all elementary and middle 
schools in Quincy. 

Jan. 19 Merrymount 
School students celebrated 
with a Chinese dinner of tea, 
rice, pineapple and apples (for 
good luck) and fortune 
cookies, with a dragon parade 
on the following day. 

Monday, Jan. 22, artists 
visited the Montclair and 
Point Webster Schools to 
teach students how to do 
paper folding and how to 
draw Chinese characters. 
On Friday, Jan. 26, Snug 



Harbor and Bernaz/ani 
School students will have a 
water color painting 
demonstration and paper 
folding. 

Tuesday. Jan. 23, second 
and third graders at Point 
Webster held their fourth 
Chinese New Year parade. 
Good luck souvenirs were 
distributed as a forty-foot 
hand painted dragon danced 
through each classroom to the 
beat of drums and the bang of 
firecrackers celebrating the 
new year. 

Thursday, Jan. 25, the 
Montclair School is 
presenting "Memories of a 
Chinese Grandmother" by 
puppeteer Judith O'Hare. 
Students will help in the 
production, and teachers will 
have a follow-up workshop. 

Monday, Feb. 5, artists will 
visit Parker and Broad 
Meadows Middle School to 
show a lantern festival and 



Chinese calligraphy 

At Squantum School, 
students practiced drawing 
Chinese characters to 
illustrate Gung Hoy Fat Choy 
or Happy New Year, They 
have discussed what the New 
Year means to their Asian 
classmates, and ha\e 
prepared for it by making 
paper lanterns, kites, dragons 
and puppets. 

Staff members of Lincoln 
Hancock School journeyed to 
Chinatown to visit shops. 
grocery stores and Chinese 
bakeries and to lunch at a 
Chinese restaurant. All have 
planned surprises for students 
to celebrate the New Year. 

All schools will have 
displays illustrating the rich 
cultural heritage of the 
Chinese people and their 
lengthy involvement with 
such pursuits. 



Slide Show Program For Eventide Auxiliary 



The William B. Rice 
Eventide Auxiliary will meet 
Monday, Jan. 29 at 2 p.m. at 
the home, 215 Adams St., 
Quincy. 



Mrs. John Dobbie will 
preside. 

A slide program by Thomas 
Hurlebus entitled "West 
Germany and Switzerland" 

Irish Dinner At 



will be introduced by Mrs 
Bryce M. Lockwood. 
program chairman. 

A social hour will follow. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



'Dance For Heart' At YMCA Feb. 3 



The South Shore YMCA, 
79 Coddington St., Quincy, 
will hold a "Dance for Heart" 
Aerobathon to benefit the 
American Heart Association, 
Saturday, Feb. 3, from 9 a.m. 
to 12 p.m. 

In recognition of February 
as National Heart Month, 
YMCA members will be 



collecting pledges based on 
the number of minutes they 
dance. Funds raised from this 
event will help support the 
American Heart Association's 
programs of heart research, 
public and professional 
education and community 
services. Prizes of T-shirts, 
crew neck sweatshirts. 



sweatsuits, water bottles and 
sports bags will be awarded to 
participants based on the 
amount of money they raise. 
This event is open to the 
public and participants are 
welcomed. For more 
information contact Donna 
Whitcomb or Ellyn Robinson 
at 479-8500. 



4 Quincy Residents On SMU Dean's List 

Anthony M. Scola, English/ 
Writing; and Teresa 



Four Quincy students have point average of 3.2 or higher, 

been named to the Southeastern They are: Michelle L. 

Massachusetts University Belanger, nursing major; Beth 

Dean's List, requiring a grade A. Manning, liberal arts; Noenickx, Marketing. 



St. Joseph School Registration Feb. 1 



St. Joseph School, 22 Pray 
St., Quincy Point, will hold 
registration for next year 



Thursday, Feb. I from 9 a.m. 

to 2 p.m. in the school library. 

Registration is open to all 



in kindergarten through grade 
eight. 

Kindergarten is an all-day 
program. 



A corned beef and cabbage 
dinner will be held Sunday, 
Jan. 28, at 3 p.m. in 
Fellowship Hall at the 

4 Thayer On 
Honor Roll 

Four Quincy residents are 
on Thayer Academy's first 
term and semester honor roll. 

They are: 

Dana Gurwitch, senior, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Gurwitch, high honors. 

Alvaro Vacchiano, senior, 
an exchange student from 
Madrid staying with Marie 
Pearce of Quincy; honors. 

Virginia Foley, sophomore, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Foley, honors. 

Paul Ginns, freshman, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Ginns, honors. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 
Church. 

Tickets at $5. for adults 
must be obtained in advance 



from Ken Stone or Mary 
Fisher. Children under 12 
years are admitted free if 
accompanied by an adult. 



6 Quincy Students 
On Massasoit Dean^s List 



Six Quincy students are on 
the Dean's List at Massasoit 
Community College for the 
Fall Semester in the Day and 
Evening Divisions. 

They are: 

Eileen M. Monahan. 119 

Woodward 



Winthrop Ave., Kevin M 
Walsh, 79 Farrington St., 
Stephanie Byron, 34 Webster 
St., William V. Bellew, 4.1 
Pelican Rd., Jeanne M 
Beckwith, 41 Sea Ave.. Dona 
M. Barnes, 8 Winthrop PI 

Entrance 



Testing Jan. 27 



The Woodward School 
Entrance Testing will be held 
Saturday, Jan. 27 at 10a.m. at 
1 102 Hancock St., Quincy. 

Open to students from all 



communities. The archdiocese 
testing will be accepted. To 
obtain further information or 
to register for this testing call 
773-5610. 







JEWELRY, GIFTS 



14 Kt. Wedding Bands 

Buy One-Get One FREE! 

All styles available 

PHASE II 

Jewelry & Gifts 

136l'Hancock Street 

Quincy Square 472-6618 



CASSANDRA'S 

Custom Designers 

of 

Fine Jewelry 

2.1.1 Hridt-c Si. Ric lA 

\. Wcvmouth .140-5.155 



CATERING 



"Party Platters" 
barry's/ 

/deli 

21 Beale St 
Wollaslon 
47l-«99 



MUSIC 



Sdv 

"I LOVE YOU TRULY" 
with 

BARON HUGO 
AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

698-9047 or 482-4550 




LIMOUSINES I RECEPTION HALLS 



HAWKES 
LIMOUSINE 

WEDDINGS 
Starting atM10.o° 

331-0405 



PHOTOGRAPHER ■ BRIDAL FASHIONS 



Photography 



Mcintif«'L-o 



679 HancocK Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6668 



PRINTING 



CHURCH PROGRAMS 

Your Pre-printed Covers 

or Custom Made 

THE QUINCY SUN 

1372 Hancock St , 

Quincy Square 

471-3100 



Creative Bridals 

54 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

472-7670 

Hours Tues. Wed, Thurs. 10-9 
"C Fri* Sat. 10-5 visa 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



« 



Have an 

affair with 

Amelia" 

Amelia's in Quincy. 
overlooks Marina Bay. 
with a panoramic view of 
the Boston skyline. This 
spacious 120 seal 
function room has an 
extensive menu at 
affordable prices This is 
an open invitation to join 
us for that specia 
reception 



I 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

Telephone 471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 




QUINTREE 

FLORIST 

Specializing in Fresh & Silks 

Open 7 days and 6 nights 
444 Quincy Ave . Brainiree 

848-9075 




Barry's 
Flower Shop 

Flowers for all occasions 

337-0970 

1000 Washington Street 

Bramtree. MA 


Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 


"** « 



ThuMday, January 25, I WO Qulncy Sun Page 7 




KATHLEEN A. COUGHLIN and SEAN W. CALVIN 

IShanin'n Sliiilifil 

Kathleen Coughlin Engaged 
To Sean Galvin 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. 
Coughlin of Quincy announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter. Kathleen A. 
Coughlin of Quincy, to Sean 
W. Galvin of Quincy, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. 
Galvin of Quincy. 

A graduate of Sacred Heart 
High School in Weymouth. 
Miss Coughlin received her 
B.S. in Nursing in 1988 from 
Nor»hcn>;tern University. She 



is a registered nurse at 
University Hospital in 
Boston. 

Mr. Galvin graduated from 
Quincy High School and 
received his B.S. in Marketing 
from Stonehill College in 
1988. He is a project manager 
for the Ricciardi Company in 
Quincy. 

A June 2 wedding is 
planned. 



Christine Golden Engaged 
To Jeffrey Johnston 



The engagement of 
Christine M. Golden to 
.leffrey W. Johnston is 
announced by her parents, 
Donald and Kathleen Golden 
of Squantum. Mr. Johnston is 
the son of Jerry and Annette 
Johnston of Fort Walton 
Beach, FU. 

The bride graduated from 
Emerson College with a 
bachelor's degree in Mass 



Communication and is 
employed by M-Geough and 
Company, Boston. 

Mr. Johnston received his 
bachelor's degree in electrical 
engineering from Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology in 
1988. A lieutenant with the 
U.S. Air Force, he is stationed 
in Kunsan, Korea. 

An October, 1990 wedding 
is planned. 



Christ Church Valentine 
Dinner Dance Feb. 3 



Christ Church, 12 Quincy 
Ave., Quincy, will hold a 
Valentines Dinner and Dance 
Saturday, Feb. 10 at the 
Quincv Neighborhood Club, 
Glendale Rd. 

There will be a cocktail 
hour beginning at 6:30 p.m. 
and a roast beef dinner will be 
served at 7:30 p.m. There will 
also be dancing, door prizes 



and a drawing. 

Tickets are $22.50 per 
person and are available by 
calling Cindy Cacicia at 849- 
7741, Roger and Judy Hamel, 
472-4201 and Bev at the 
Christ Church Office, 773- 
0310. 

Tickets are limited and no 
tickets will be sold after 
Wednesday, Jan. 31. 



'In The Bag' Topic 
For Bethany Churchwomen 



"It's In the Bag," a review 
and update of Morgan 
Memorial Goodwill Industries, 
Inc., will be given by Rev. 
Henry E. Helms at the Feb. 7 
meeting of Bethany Church- 
women. 

Rev. Mr. Helms, executive 
director of Goodwill 
Industries for 25 years, is the 
son of the late Dr. Edgar J. 
Helms, the founder. 

The Rev. Mr. Helms 
"retired" in 1977, "retired" 
again in 1982, and is now 
teaching English as a second 
language, as a part of Morgan 
Memorial Goodwill Indus- 



tries philosophy. 



Social 




MR. and MRS. ANDRKW (. KI.KINS 



lljlitiiril ( III kill ^ I 



Patricia Brown Wed 
To Andrew Elkins 



Patricia M. Brown, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James F. Brown of Quincy. 
was recently married to 
Andrew C. Elkins. son of 
Mrs. Ann Elkins and the late 
Mr. Phillip Elkins of 
Worcester. 

The double ring interfaith 
ceremony was held in Marsh 
Chapel at Boston University 
and performed by the Rev. 
Joseph F. Byrne, a longtime 
friend of the bride's family 
and Rabbi Albert Ginsburgh. 
The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 

A reception followed at the 
Top of The Ridge in 
Braintree. 

Susan M. Brown of Quincy 
served as Maid ol Honor tor 
her sister. Bridesmaids were 
MarvAnne Weishaupt of 
M ilford , Conn. , and 
Catherine Brown of Merrimack, 
N H . >"♦ h sisters of the bride. 



Irene Papamarkou and 
Christine Francis, both of 
Quincy. and Kathleen Keeley 
of South Boston. 

Richard Ross of Man- 
chester, Conn, was best man. 
Ushers were Craig Dwy of 
West Roxbury, Sam Baum of 
West Caldwell, N.J., Aaron 
White of Mechanic Falls, 
Maine, Alex Cherlin of Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla., and Murad 
Khan of Great Barrington. 

A graduate of Quincy High 
School, the bride attended 
Northeastern University and 
is employed by Sheraton 
Boston Hotel and Towers. 

The groom is a graduate of 
Dogherty High School and 
College of Boca Raton. He is 
employed by A-Copy 
America. 

After a wedding trop to 
Hawaii, the newlyweds are 
living in Natick. 



^Russia Today' Topic 
For Quincy Women's Club 



Thomas Hurlebaus will 
speak on "Russia Today" at 
the Feb. 13 meeting of the 
Quincy Women's Club at 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. 

After the noon coffee 
hours Mrs. John Debbie will chairmen. 



preside at the business 
meeting. 

Hostesses will be the 
Veterans Committee, Mrs. 
Robert P. Nordstrom and 
Mrs. William F. Greene, Co- 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERSM6 



TUES. 4 THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 
PERM SPECIAL ^ 

UNIPERM ' 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 
Cn slightly highe 
Complete 



GOLDWELL complete 

^^^^*"*^ eCCin ^''^''•'y '^'S'^®^ Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 

FOAM PERM ^OO^^oronger'^air Sculptured Na... Ss/ 

All soecials oerlormed bv one of Russell s stall Pedicures $22 



All specials performed by one ol Russell s stall 
— » Russell Edward's 



Q/(/7/l/i/^f€ (-'^le 



Body and Facial Waxing Available" 



Y/r^ 



OPEN 9-5 DAILY WED, THURS & FRI EVENINGS --,o-inoA 

Corner Hancock. Chestnut & Maple Sts, 1 Maple St., Quincy 472-|0dU 




LISA M. MELLO 



(Amor PhotoKraphy) 



Lisa Mello Engaged 
To Lawrence Laing 



Mr. and Mrs. Antone 
Mello, Jr. of Fall River 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Lisa M. Mello 
of Brighton to Lawrence 
Laing of Brighton, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Laing of 
Wollaston. 

Miss Mello is a 1983 
graduate of Boston College 
anH is employed as an 



Associate Director of Public 
Relations for the American 
Red Cross. 

Mr. Laing, also a 1983 
graduate of Boston College, is 
employed as an Account 
Supervisor for the Tufts 
Associated Health Plan. 

A January, 1991 wedding is 
being planned. 



Mr., Mrs. Paul Garity 
Parents Of Two Daughters 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Garity 
of Manhattan Beach. Calif, 
are parents of twin daughters, 
Caroline Bell and Kimberly 
Jean, born Dec. 14, at Cedars 
Sinai Hospital in Beverly 
Hills. Calif. 

Mrs. Gantv is the former 



Dana Bell. 

Grandparents are Mr, and 
Mrs. Joseph I. Garity Jr., of 
Quincy and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert J. Bell of Winston- 
Salem, N.C. Great-grand- 
mother is Mrs. Robert G. 
Stuart of North Quincy, 



Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Formerly the 

If infield House Restaiiranl 

Christmas Sale Now On! 
thru Jan. 31st 

OPEN 6 DAY.S A WEEK 

Hours: Tues-Sat 10:00 AIVf-5:00 PM 

Sundays 12:00 Noon-S:00 PM Cl«>sed Mondays 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 479^9784 




rTTTTTTTrr -iTi' f '1' r-i' i '■' irrTTTnfTTYTTrTTTTrrTT ; 



^ ,^J044CA (f W^:^:, 



^(ni^ie ^ixUetla^ d 




0" 



(J 



s|l 



1(" 



Senior 

Citizens 

Discount 




flt 



G,oa3V 



iiiP 






^^ 




28 Greeniwood Ave 



7\ 



Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. - 5 30P M 

M g 30 



Wollaston 

OM Irom the \*B 



kOp*n Thu'S e»es i-i 8 
773-5266 



VliA 



■w 



P»tt I Quincy Sun Thursday . January 2S. 1990 




Spotlight on 
HEALTH 

AND 

FITNESS 




Guide Targets Healthy Food Choices 



How To Deal With Chronic Pain 



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WORKOUT 



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Jacki Sorensen's Aerobic Workout 

Drop in Anytime, Pay As You Go 

Workout - featuring VERTIFIRM ™ 
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2 Classes $^tM FREE 

(new students with this ad) 






QUINCY CLASSES 

Woodward School, 1102 Hancock Street 

Mon./Wed. 6:30 p.m. Sat. 9:00 a.m. 

500 Victory Road, Marina Bay 

Tuesday/Thursday 6:30 p.m. 

Call Claire For Details - 698-4607 

JU 



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A programs 




Chiropractic 
Update 

by 

Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 



SAVE YOUR BACK WHILE SHOVELING SNOW 

The storm that blew several inches of snow in our 
direction recently provides an appropriate time to offer a 
few suggestions on proper shoveling techniques. At the 
risk of sounding "like a wiseguy" the best way to prevent 
problems shoveling snow is to avoid doing it altogether by 
using a snowblower or by paying someone to do it for you. 
Most importantly, any person with a history of heart 
problems or any person at risk of heart problems should 
ask their doctor for approval. If you absolutely must shovel 
snow, the following guidelines may be helpful: 

1. Warm up prior to shoveling as you would do before 
exercising 

2. Pace yourself depending on the conditions. Shoveling 
heavy wet snow takes a heck of a lot more energy than 
shoveling fluffy white snow 

3. Use the proper shovel Using a short, wide, flat bladed 
shovel may be perfect for pushing light snow, but could be 
disastrous in trying to shovel (the heavier wet snow). 

Generally speaking a long handled shovel, or better yet. 
a "back saver" shovel with a bent shaft, reduces the strairi 
on your back. 

4. Keep your back straight, bend with your knees and 
turn your feet and legs when "throwing the snow ' This is 
crucial because it is usually the quick twist of your back 
while you are bent over slightly that causes most injuries, 

5. Switch sides when shoveling so that you're not always 
throwing the snow In the same direction. 

If you have any questions or would like to make an 
appointment please call Or Mark Jaehnig. a lifelong 
Quincy resident, at Quincy Chiropractic Office. 440 
Hancock Street, North Quincy, 773-4400 



cl, Mills .is 'liiilii.' "no L'holi's. 
kiol. "liMtroiicn.iIi'ir .llkl 
"p.nii.ilK h\ilroi;i."n.ik'il." .Ami 
ilk-\ iv ivmiiulcil lo liiiiil s.iiurak-il 
l.ils: 1.O1.0IUI1 .llkl p.iliii oils. I. ml. 
s.ill pork .llkl Inilk'r 

\ikl ihc iv.ilK pivsMiis; qiK's- 
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uhik- si.iikliiii; 111 itlkl .iisk- with ;i 
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Jk', kills; oiil.' 

Ilk- \iik'rk,iii nk-k-lK' .Asso 
ci.iIiom's f\>i Ll'l Siipiiiihiikcl 
(.iiiij,- olltTs «i'll-inlonik'J, am- 
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pers troiii ik-li 111 ikiiiA «ilh sue 
eiikl. spceilk' lips .iboiil i.-om- 
nionl\ piiali.isi-il l>pi.'s ol iooil 
(hi.iiki iwiik's MX luil iiklikk-ill. 

Ill >.',kll ol .^4 ■.■;ik-j;oik-s. in- 
lonn.ilion is .irnintial in two col- 
iimns--onc «illi i;ciicr;il luilriliim 
iiuiJcliiics, ihe oiher wiih moncv- 
s.iMiii!. dicl-trii-ndiv hints 

.Similar help covers every- 
ihiiii; lioin salad dressint; lo fro- 
zen dinners lo sn;ick foods in Ihe 
Pihkci Siipvnmiikci Ciiidc. an il 
liislraled. l2-pai:c hooklei thai Ills 
easiU inio pocket or purse. To 
order Ihc Pocket Siiiwimaikct 
(iiiiilc. send S2.50 and a sell-ad- 
dressed, sianiped (45 cenis) enve- 
lope lo Deparlmenl T2, The 
.•\merican Dielelic .Associalion, c/ 

Anderson Secrclarial Senice. 

1 I. '2 .S. Jellerson .Si.. Chic.ijio. IL 
6()6(»7, 



By DANIELS. KARP 

There are millions of people 
who suffer with chronic pain. 

They are veterans injured in 
wars, cancer patients, 
paraplegics, neuralgics. 
amputees, arthritics; patients 
suffering with migrane, disc 
diseases, tendonitis, muscle 
spasm, psychogenic pain and 
others. 

Numerous methods are 
available to deal with pain. 
They encompass drug 
therapy, biofeedback, 
behavioral therapy, neuro- 
surgery, nerve block, and 
electrical stimulation. All of 
these play an important role 
in pain management, but 
none is a universal remedy. 

Evidence reveals that 
acupuncture relieves chronic 
pain. Research shows that it 
has significant therapeutic 
potential. It is also free of side 



effects and toxic burdens 
which accompany the use of 
many modern drugs. 

In a long-term study 
conducted by Prof. C.W. 
Waylonis at Ohio State 
University, it was consluded 
that "acupuncture appears to 
be of significant value in the 
sumptomatic control of pain. 
From the standpoint of 
physical medicine it appears 
to be a modality w hich may be 
more effective than any other 
single method (i.e., drugs, 
injections, and physical 
agents) in the treatment of 
fibrotisis syndrome. It was 
more successful by a 3:1 ratio 
than any other method of 
treatment. The duration of 
acupuncture's effectiveness 
was best and exceeded all 
other methods by a 6: 1 ratio." 

Another report from the 
lini^ersitv of Alabama 



Medical School Pain Clinic 
concluded that acupuncture 
worked in more than 5."^ 
percent of the 300 patients in 
the study. The various types 
of pain problems treated had 
been present from one to 
thirty years and the duration 
of significant pain relief was 
as long as six months in some 
41 percent of those treated 

Acupuncture has been a 
valuable part of Chinese 
medicine for 4,000 years. It is 
taught in the medical faculties 
of universities, is included in 
the medical curriculum, and is 
practiced by one millions 
doctors in China. 

For further inforniatuui 
contact Daniel S. Karp. I.ic 
Ac, Acupuncture Associates 
of the South Shore. 12 
Dimmock St,, Quincv. 4^1- 
5577. 



QJC Sponsoring 2 
AIDS- Related Seminars 



Quincy Junior College's 
Continuing Education Office 
is sponsoring two AIDS- 
related seminars in coopera- 
tion with the AIDS Action 
Committee of Massachusetts, 
Inc. 

The first seminar will 
provide general information 
and is titled, "Understanding 
AIDS — It's Everyone's 




THE SIVIART 
WAY TO 
A HEALTHY 
LOOKING 
TAN. 

knowing how to tan 
be dangerous. 

At Tanline 2001 we care about your skin and 
understand how important it is to deveJop 
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Try our FREE Introductory session. 

Ask about it by calling: 

773-1611 

i-ipANLINE2001. 

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(next to the Registry) 



Problem" and will focus on 
the symptoms, treatment, 
testing procedures and 
dealing with people who have 
tested positive with the 
disease. Also to be covered 
will be how to decrease fear in 
the community and a question 
and answer period will follow. 
A person with AIDS will be 
present to share his 
experiences. 

This seminar is for 
educators, nurses, counselors, 
administrators and parents. It 
will be held Wednesday, Feb. 
7 from 7-9:30 p.m. 

The second seminar is 
designed for Human 
Resource Managers, Corpo- 
rate Trainers, Nurses. 
Managers and Supervisors 
and is titled "A IDS Education 
in the Workplace." This 
seminar will focus on the 
needs and responsibilities for 
any office or business to have 
a plan for employee education 
and accommodation of AIDS 



or ARC patients. 

Registrants will also learn 
how to react to co-worker 
harassment, how to propcrls 
manage the employee with 
AIDS, and appropriate legal 
issues, as well as what 
corporate policies and 
employee accommodation 
your place of employmeni 
needs to provide. 

This seminar will be held 
Wednesday, Feb. 21 from "- 
9:30 p.m. 

It is recommended that 
those interested in this 
seminar have prior know ledge 
of AIDS, or have attended the 
"Understanding AIDS 
seminar on Feb, 7. 

Both seminars are S25 each 
and will be held at the 
Woodward School oft 
campus site at 1 102 Hancock 
St., Quincy, 

To get more information or 
to register for either seminar 
call the Continuing Education 
office at 984-1655. 



Health & Nutrition 

by Judith Sheldon 



NAILING DOWN THE TRUTH ABOUT MANI 
CURES: A recent spate of nail problems, including 
infections and allergies, has alarmed dennatologists who 
link these outbreaks to the boom of nail care salons, some 
of which may not follow proper sanitary procedures. 

Among the infections that are being seen are varieties 
of fungal problems; the yeast infection is the most 
prevalent and can cause the nails to deteriorate or 
become deformed. Another fungus is ringworm, in which 
tiie nail turns white, gets thick, and breaks off. Antifungal 
solutions are used to treat the infections, but progress is 
slow, often taking months. Viral infections (warts, etc.) 
are also difficult to treat. Bacterial infections cause the 
nail to turn black or green. Antibiotics are used to treat 
bacteria] infections. 



Do You Suffer From? 

• Migraines 

• Back Pain /Sciatica 

• Arthritic Pain 

• Sports Injuries 

• Obesity 

• Inability to Stop 
Smoking 




Daniel S. Karp 
Licensed Acupunturist 

471-5577 

Conveniently Located 

in Quincy Sq near T Station! 

12 Dimmock St. Quincy 



ACUPUNCTURE ASSOCIATES 

OF THE SOUTH SHORE 

Can Help . . . 

Acupuncture works by slimulaling llic 
body's own healing abilities. 
Acupuncture Associalcs ol the South ShorJ 
is a medical health service specializing in the 
treatment of chronic pain.as wellasoltcring 
iradilionul pic\enii\c care. Accepted b> 
many insurance companies, 

•I're-.SlrriliwMl 




Thursday, January 2S, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 9 



IVfi<;hael Prezioso 
On Honor Roll 

Michael Prezioso, a second 
grader at St. Joseph School, 
Quincy, was inadvertently 
omitted from a listing of 

honor roll students in the Jan. 
4 edition of The Quincy Sun. [ 



FRANCIS X. McCAULEY 

Announces the opening of his office for the 

practice of State and Federal Income Tax 

preparation for individuals. 

The Quincy Cooperative Bank Building 

1245 Hancock St. 
Quincy Square 

479-6230 773-9927 



WCiei^CUT CLUe 



INTRODUCES 



A CHRISTMAS CAROL - Parker School students presented "A Christmas Carol" as part of 
their recent holiday celebrations. From left: The Ghost of Christmas Present (Tim Shubert)and 
Scrooge (John Heim) look on as the Cratchet family (Kvan Ha, Tasha Belus and Trina Aitken) 
prepare for the holiday. Tiny Tim (Sean Glennon) and Bob Cratchet (Maureen Sullivan) relax. 

((Jiiincy Sun phnin h\ Tnnt (iorman) 



Healing Service At Sacred Heart 

A Healing Service will be Rev. Charles Flaherty will P^"- Jamie, Christian 

held Tuesday Jan. 30, at ,,,,i,rate Mass and conduct """^f "^' *'" P^^^'^^^ '^' 

Sacred Heart Church, North music. 

Quincy. the healing service at 7:30 "^'^ ^""^ welcome. 



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Page 10 Qulncy Sun Thunday, January 25, I9M 



Quincy Democrats To Caucus Feb. 3 



Ward 1 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward I will hold a caucus 
Saturday. Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. at 
the Houghs Neck Community 
Center, Sea St., to elect 
delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Leo Kelly is the chairman 
of the Ward 1 Democratic 
Committee. 

Ward 1 will elect five male 
delegates and five female 
delegates and one alternate to 
send to the convention. The 
apportioned number of 
delegates has been allocated 
on the basis of a formula 
giving equal weight to the 
Democratic Party registra- 
tion and the average vote for 
Democratic candidates in the 
last general elections for 
governor and president for 
which figures were available 
at the time delegate 
tabulations were prepared. 

The caucus is open to all 
registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to register 
and media representatives. 
The only persons eligible to 
participate in any portion of 
the caucus are those who are 
registered Democrats in the 
ward or town as of Dec. 29, 
1989. There will be no 
absentee voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate miist also be 
present, \oting and give his or 



her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomina- 
tion must be seconded by two 
persons at the local caucus. 

All ballots will be written 
and secret. Those candidates 
receiving the greatest number 
of votes on the first ballot will 
be elected. 

Each candidate will be 
allowed to make a two-minute 
speech and to distribute on his 
or her behalf one sheet of 
paper listing qualifications 
and ideas. 

Slate-making is allowed, 
but no special preferences 
shall be given to slates. There 
is no quorum requirement for 
the caucus. 

There will be no admission 
or expense charge at the 
caucus, although donations 
may be solicited. 

Discrimination on the basis 
of race, sex, age, color, creed, 
national origin, religion, 
ethnic identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic status 
in the conduct of the caucus is 
strictly prohibited. 

Challenges to the delegate 
selection process can be filed 
in writing with the Compli- 
ance Review Commission, 
c/o the Massachusetts 
Democratic Party, 45 
Bromfield St., Boston, MA 
02108 no later than Feb. 5, 
1990. 



Ward 2 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 2 will hold a caucus on 
Saturday, Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. to 
elect delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 2 will elect 12 
delegates and four alternates 
equaJJy divided between men 

and women to send to the 

convention. 

Ward 2 Democratic 
Committee Chairman Ronald 
Mariano will call the caucus 
at the Fore River Clubhouse, 
16 Nevada Rd. Quincy. The 
caucus is open to all registered 
Democrats, persons ineligible 
to register and media 



rcpreseniatives. The only 
persons eligible to participate 
in any portion of the caucus 
are those who registered 
Democrats in the ward as of 
Dec. 29, 1989. There will be 
no absentee or proxy voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate must also be 
present, voting and give his or 
her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomi- 
nation must be seconded by 
two persons present at the 
local caucus. 

Ballots will be written and 
secret. Candidates receiving 
the greatest number of votes 
on the first ballot will be 
elected. 



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Ward 3 



Ward 5 



Registeied Democrats in 
Ward 3 will hold a caucus 
Saturday, Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. to 
elect delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 3 will elect 12 
delegates and four alternates 
equally divided between men 
and women to send to the 
- convention. The apportioned 
number of delegates has been 
allocated on the basis of a 
formula giving equal weight 
to the Democratic Party 
registration and the average 
vote for Democratic 
candidates in the last general 
elections for governor and 
president for which figures 
were available at the time 
delegate tabulations were 
prepared. 

Chairman John Lydon Jr. 
will call the caucus at Granite 
Place, 125 Granite St., 
Quincy. The caucus is open to 
all registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to register 
and media representatives. 
The only persons eligible to 
participate in any portion of 
the caucus are those who are 
registered Democrats in the 
ward or town as of Dec. 29, 
1989. There will be no 
absentee or proxy voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate must also be 
present, voting and give his or 



her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomina- 
tion must be seconded by two 
persons at the local caucus. 

All ballots will be written 
and secret. Those candidates 
receiving the greatest number 
of votes on the first ballot will 
be elected. 

Each candidate will be 
allowed to make a two-minute 
speech and to distribute on his 
or her behalf one sheet of 
paper listing qualifications 
and ideas. 

Slate-making is allowed, 
but no special preferences 
shall be given to slates. There 
is no quorum requirement for 
the caucus. 

There will be no admission 
or expense charge at the 
caucus, although donations 
may be solicited. 

Discrimination on the basis 
of race, sex, age, color, creed, 
national origin, religion, 
ethnic identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic status 
in the conduct of the caucus is 
strictly prohibited. 

Challenges to the delegate 
selection process can be filed 
in writing with the Compli- 
ance Review Commission, 
c/o the Massachusetts 
Democratic Party, 45 
Bromfield St., Boston, MA 
02108 no later than Feb. 5, 
1990. 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 5 will hold a caucus on 
Saturday, Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. at 
the Wollaston Methodist 
Church, 40 Beale St. 

Ward 5 will elect 1 1 
delegates and four alternates 
to the 1990 Massachusetts 
Democratic Convention. 

Stephen McGrath will 
chair the caucus. 

The caucus is open to all 
registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to register 
and media representatives. 
The only persons eligible to 
participate in any portion of 
the caucus are those who are 



registered Democrats in the 
ward as of Dec. 29, 1989. 
There will be absentee or 
proxy voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate must also be 
present, voting and give his or 
her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomina- 
tion must be seconded by two 
persons present at the local 
caucus. 

Ballots will be written and 
secret. Candidates receiving 
the greatest number of votes 
on the first ballot will be 
selected. 



Ward 6 



Ward 4 



Registered Democrats in 
Quincy Ward Four will hold a 
caucus Saturday, Feb. 3 at 2 
p.m. in the cafetorium of 
Lincoln-Hancock School, 
Water St. entrance. 

The purpose of the caucus 
is to elect delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 4 will be electing W 
delegates and four alternates 
to the convention, evenly 
divided between men and 
women. The number of 
delegates allowed a ward is 
based upon the number of 
registered Democrats in the 
ward and the average number 
of those who voted in the past 
Presidential and Gubernator- 
ial elections. 

The State Convention will 
be held June I and 2 at the 
Springfield Civic Center. The 
purpose of that convention is 
to nominate Democratic 
party candidate for U.S. 
Senate and Governor, 
Lieutenant Governor, 
Treasurer, Secretary of State 
Attorney General and 
Auditor. 

Registration fee for 
delegates costs $35 and the 
forms for filing those and for 
housing at the convention will 
be provided to those who are 
elected to be delegates on the 
day of the caucus. 

Bernice Mader, Ward 
Chairwoman and Democratic 
State Committeewoman, will 
call the caucus to order at 2 



p.m. Any person who was a 
registered Democrat in Ward 
4 as of Dec. 29, 1989 may 
participate in the caucus by 
either voting for candidates or 
running as a candidate. 

Candidates must be present 
and voting, give their written 
consent to being nominated 
and must have their 
nomination seconded by two 
persons who are eligible and 
present. Each candidate for 
delegate may give a two 
minutes speech and distribute 
one sheet of paper listing 
his/her qualifications and 
ideas. 

All ballots will be written 
and secret. Slates are allowed 
but they are not given 
preference nor are they 
allowed to be nominated as a 
group at one time. Each 
person must be nominated 
individually. 

There is no official quorum 
required to hold a caucus. The 
caucus is free and open to 
view by all interested 
spectators and members of 
the press. 

Caucuses will not discrim- 
inate on the basis of race, sex, 
age, color, creed, national 
origin, religion, ethnic 
identity or economic status. 

A regular Ward 4 
Democratic Committee 
meeting will follow the 
caucus. The major item on the 
agenda will be the election of 
officers. This meeting is also 
open to the public. 

I SUBSCRIPTION FORM I 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 6 will hold a caucus 
Saturday, Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. to 
elect delegates to the 1990 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 6 will elect 1 1 
delegates and four alternates 
equally divided between men 
and women to send to the 
convention. The apportioned 
number of delegates has been 
allocated on the basis of a 
formula giving equal weight 
to the Democratic Party 
registration and the average 
vote for the Democratic 
candidates in the last general 
elections for governor and 
president for which figures 
were available at the time 
delegate tabulations were 
prepared. 

Chairman Marcia McCarthy 
will call the caucus at Quincy 
Lodge of Elks Hall, 440 East 
Squantum St. 

The caucus is open to all 
registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to register 
and media representatives. 
The only persons eligible to 
participate in any portion of 
the caucus are those who are 
registered Democrats in the 
ward or city as of Dec. 29, 
1989. There will be no 
absentee or proxy voting. 

Candidates for delegate 
and alternate must also be 



present, voting and give his or 
her written consent to be 
nominated and that nomina- 
tion must be seconded by two 
persons at the local caucus. 

All ballots will be written 
and secret. Those candidates 
receiving the greatest number 
of votes on the first ballot will 
be elected. 

Each candidate will be 
allowed to make a two-minute 
speech and to distribute on 
his/her behalf one sheet ot 
paper listing qualifications 
and ideas. 

Slate-making is allowed, 
but no special preferences 
shall be given to slates. There 
is no quorum requirement lor 
the caucus. 

There will be no admission 
or expense charge at the 
caucus, although donations 
may be solicited. 

Discrimination on the basis 
of race, age, color, creed. 
national origin, religion, 
ethnic identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic status 
in the conduct of the caucus ^ 
strictly prohibited. 

Challenges to the delegate 
selection process can be filed 
in writing with the Compli- 
ance Review Commission 
c/o the Massachuset!^ 
Democratic Parts. 4 5 
Bromfield St., Boston. M\ 
02108 no later than F-eb .^ 
1990. 



Census Bureau 
Seeks Employees 



The U.S. Census Bureau is 
looking to fill nearly 500 
temporary jobs throughout 
Norfolk County which 
includes Quincy, 

The jobs will last from a few 
weeks to a few months. Work 
will begin at intervals during 
February and March, 

The jobs will be part of the 
1990 US. DECENNIAL 
CENSUS, when every 
household and resident of the 
United States will be counted 
as mandated by the U.S. 
Constitution. Many jobs will 
be office jobs in the Randolph 
Census District Office, but 
most positions will be for 
door-to-door census takers. 



Cftxi.±n.oar 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY. MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



2iP_ 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $11.00 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $12.00 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $15.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 




Pay is $6.75 to $7,50 an hour 
for census takers and mileajic 
is paid. Employees also will be 
paid for training. 

"It's very important that we 
have residents of Norfolk 
County to work in these 
census operations, said 
Connie Canniff, manager ol 
the Census Bureau's office in 
Randolph. "We want people 
who are familiar with this 
area. Then we will have the 
best possible census count. 

This year's Census counts 
will be used to determine 
political representation and 
how billions of dollars in 
federal and state funds are 
distributed. Local govern- 
ment and businesses also use 
census numbers for planning. 

To apply or for more 
information, call the 
Randolph Census District 
Office at (617) 986-0175 or 
write the office at 247 North 
Main Street, Randolph, MA 
02368. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Thursday, January 2S, I9M Quincy Sun Page II 




Real Estate News 



Is Now A Good Time To 
Refinance Your Mortgage? 




Surgeons Lease Space 
At Crown Colony 



With interest rates 
dropping, many homeowners 
who purchased their homes 
when rates were higher are 
considering refinancing. 

But is refinancing worth it? 

"Refinancing can be 
worthwhile, but it does not 
make good financial sense for 
everyone," says Patricia 
Downing, president of the 
Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors. 

A general rule of thumb is 
that refinancing is worth your 
while if the current interest 
rate on your mortgage is at 
least two percentage points 
higher than the prevailing 
market rate. This figure is 
considered a safe margin 
when balancing the costs of 
refinancing a mortgage 
against the savings. 

"There are other factors to 
consider, however," adivses 
Downing. "For instance, how 
long you plan to stay in your 
home is an important factor. 
It generally takes at least three 
years to realize fully the 
saving from a lower interest 
rate." 

The Quincy and South 
Shore Board of Realtors 
advises that refinancing 
should be considered for 
homeowners who meet one or 



more of the following 
criterion: 

• Want out of a high 
interest rate loan to take 
advantage of lower rates and 
plan to stay in their homes for 
at least three years. 

• Have an adjustable-rate 
mortgage (ARM) and want a 
fixed rate loan to have the 
certainty of knowing exactly 
what the mortgage payment 
will be for the life of the loan. 

• Want to build up equity 
more quickly by converting to 
a loan with a shorter term. 

• Want to convert to an 
ARM with a lower interest 
rate or more protective 
features, such as a better rate 
or payment cap. 

• Want to draw on the 
equity built up in their home 
to get cash for major 
expenses. 

If you are deciding whether 
to refinance an adjustable- 
rate mortgage, consider 
whether the next interest rate 
adjustment on your existing 
loan is likely to increase your 
monthly payments sub- 
stantially, and whether the 
interest rate will two or three 
percentage points higher than 
the prevailing rates being 
offered for either fixed-rate or 



other ARMs. 

Also, if there is a cap on 
your current monthly 
payments, are those payments 
large enough to pay off your 
loan by the end of the original 
term? Will refinancing a new 
ARM or a fixed-rate 
mortgage enable you to pay 
your loan in full by the end of 
the term? 

"These are questions that 
are important to consider 
before proceeding with 
refinancing an adjustable-rate 
mortgage, says Downing. 

"Homeowners who decide 
to refinance should be aware 
of the costs involved," advises 
Downing. Much like a first 
mortgage, refinancing 
includes fees for the 
application, the title search 
and title insurance, and the 
lender's attorney's review. In 
addition, there are loan 
origination fees (charged for 
lender's work in evaluating 
and preparing the loan) and 
discount points (prepaid 
finance charges imposed by 
the lender at closing), an 
appraisal fee and other 
miscellaneous fees. 

Homeowners should plan 
on paying an average of three 
to six percent of the 



outstanding principal in 
refinancing costs, plus any 
cost of paying off a second 
mortgage that may exist. 
Costs may vary significantly, 
however, from lender to 
lender, so it's important to 
shop around.j 

"You may want to first 
check with the lender who 
holds your current mortgage," 
suggests Downing. "The 
lender may be willing to waive 
some of the fees, especially if 
the work relating to the 
mortgage closing is still 
current." 

If you are interested in 
refinancing, the Members of 
the Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors recom- 
mend that you meet with a 
lender to discuss the process, 
expenses and potential 
benefits in detail. "A fully 
informed homeowner will be 
in the best position to make a 
sound decision regarding the 
refinancing of his or her 
home," says Downing. 

The Quincy and South 
Board of Realtors is one of 
more than 1,800 boards 
nationwide that comprise the 
National Association of 
Realtors, the nation's largest 
trade association and the 
voice of real estate. 



Dr. David Heller and Dr. 
David Henry, orthopedic 
surgeons, have recently leased 
office space in Crown Colony 
Medical Office Condomin- 
ium, located at 500 Congress 
Street within the Crown 
Colony Office Hotel complex 
at the intersection of Routes 3 
& 128. 

Drs. Heller and Henry will 



share a state-of-the-art office. 
Their practices include a total 
of 33 years experience in joint 
replacement surgery, fracture 
surgery and arthroscopic 
surgery. Having worked 
together for ten years, the 
doctors are relocating their 
office from 549 Washington 
St. in Braintree and are 
affiliated with South Shore, 
Carney and Quincy Hospitals. 



Century 21 Raises 
$8,244 For Disabled 



CENTURY 21 Annex 
Realty in Quincy is among the 
local area CENTURY 21 
offices who have raised a total 
of $8,244. in 1989 for the 
benefit of the physically 
disabled children and adults 
in their communities through 
local Easter Seal programs. 

The offices' major events 
included yard sales, a sock 




House 
Hunting Hints 



A good thing to remember 
after you've found the right 
house and before you close i.s 
to .see if it has a warranty and 
if so, does this warranty 
transfer. 



Tax Information Program Feb. 21 



The Mayor's Commission 
on the Status of Women will 
conduct an informational 
program on taxes Wednesday, 
Feb. 21 at 7:15 p.m. in the 



second floor conference room 
of Quincy City Hall. 

Tax specialist Sharon 
Lemoff will speak on 



i 


\ k) \l 


8^- \\\ 


@ 




"Women and Taxes — Tax 
Survival." She will give tax 

tips for women including 
single mothers, widows, the 
elderly and college students. 

The program is free and 
open to the public. 



Every year, one out of every five American families 
moves. 




So far, more than two 
million homes are protected 
with a ten-year HOW war- 
ranty. 

Most builders will use their 
warranty as a basis for the 
walk-through, pointing out 
areas of coverage and attempt- 
ing to alleviate any confusion 
over coverage responsibilities. 
Get a copy of the warranty prior 
to the walk-through and be 
prepared to ask questions. 

Most warranties will trans- 
fer from one owner to another 
during their life cycle, but it's 
always best to ask. 



NEED A QUICK 



NO HASSLE DECISION? 

Get fast, friendly service from people 
who understand your real estate needs 

• CONSTRUCTION • REMODELING • 

• SECONDS • SMALL INCOME PROPERTY • 

• WRAPAROUNDS • BRIDGE LOANS • 

• REFINANCING AND TEMPORARY FINANCING • 

• MAXIMUM LOAN VALUE • 

• NO FANNIE MAE/FREDDIE MACorPMI REDTAPE • 

Contact Charles R. Butts. President/CEO 

Meetinghouse 
Cooperative Bank 

2250 Dorchester Avenue 

Dorchester, MA 02124 

617-298-2250 

■ SINCE 1914 



TULLISH & CLANCY R E INC 

1440 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

(617)773-7300 

(617)331-3232 

Come in 

and speal< to us 

about housing 

or a career 
in Real Estate 



ROFFO RENTS! 
TAKE YOUR PICK! 
1 STOP SHOPPING! 

QUI-BRA-WEY 
SOME PETS O.K. 

Nice Studios. $$495-525 
heated 

Large Modern ONE & 
TWO BEDROOMS. 
Walk to T. $495-1850 
heated. Some-Option/ 
Buy 

Ultra Modern Luxury 1 & 

2 bedroom. Amenities+. 
$700-$950+ 

3 bedroom HOuses 
$900-$ 11 00+ 

LARGE, MODERN 2 
BEDROOM. All painted, 
new carpet, amenities+. 
Near X-way. $850 
heated. 

SYLVIA ROFFO 
& ASSOC. 

688 Hancock Street 
Wollaston 

328-5800 





LET'S GO With LUKOW 

Let me help with 

Your Real Estate Needs in 1990 




SELLING? 



BUYING? 



m 



mis 



Ask me about my proven 30 day Marketing 
Plan 

I can save you money with my flexible tees 
Call me today and let's talk about your plans 

You've picked a great time to buy! 
Rates are down and prices are right! 
I know the market from Quincy to Plymouth 
CALL ME TODAY and Let's Go! 
SEE MY LISTINGS on Channel 20 - Cable T.V. 
I will put your home on T.V.I 



ROBERT LUKOW 



WOLLASTON - Easy walk to T. 
Don't ml» this charming, 
•unny 3 l>«droom home. New 
bath, oak floors, fireplace. 
$150'« 

OUINCY-MERRYMOUNT - 
Direct ocean front - YOUR 

OWN BEACH! Plus 7 room 
Colonial for only $289,90011 



(S) 



of the south shore 



ADAMS PROFESSIONAL BLDG. 770-1444 

6 Fort St Oulncy - Voice Mail - 24 Hrs. Toll Free 230-5012 



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hop, donation of interest from 
escrow and a volleyball 
marathon. 




The Sound investment . 

Yes, you can .. live in it, 
enjoy it, grow in it, improve 
it, but, first you have to BUY 
IT ... here's the l<ey to the 
sound investment: 

WOLLASTON. Dream 
kitchen with cathedral 
ceilings, skylites, sliders to 
deck. Formal living and 
dining room. Three 
bedrooms, two full baths. 
New family room. Walk to 
T. $178,000. 

WEST. Residence B Zoned 
15120 square foot lot with 
two single family homes 
five room, two bath 
Co\or\\a\, four room 
bungafow. %22S,,000. 

SOUANTUM. Two bed- 
room, two bath Colonial. 
10400 square foot lot, high 
on a hill. $199,900. 

328-9400 



SfiEOUni.lSIINOS()N 



■Wfl 



cnble di, 20 
7(/WF \N AND SEC THE DirrEHf^NCEi 



Quincy 

independence Condo- 
minium - great buy, pool - 
storage - laundry - 
attractive one bedroom 
$84,900 

Squantum - Charming 6 
rm. Colonial, lovely side 
street, retiring owner. We 
invite you to compare 
$179,900 

Loulsburg Square - 

exceptional 4 bedroom 
brick town home. Gracious 
use of space - lots of 
privacy $179,900 

Quinqr Square - Profes- 
sional side street quality 4 
bedroom Dutch Colonial. A 
garden lover's dream come 
true. $179,900 

Penn't Hiii - Income and 
more- 2 family with in-law. 
2 car garage, excellent 
condition. A rare find. 
$240,000 

Preiidenti Hill - This 
you've got to see. Excellent 
buy in top prices neighbor- 
hod. Immaculate inside 
and out. Custom built 7 rm. 
Garrison. $349,900 

You're invited Super 
Sunday - January 28, 12-4 
p.m. - Open House, 49 
Beale St. Stop in - meet 
mortgage broker for 
qualifying - get to visit all 
our condo listings that you 
choose. Refreshments. 

Century 21 
Annex Realty 

49 Beaie SL 
Woliaston 

472-4330 



fage 12 Qvincy Sun Thursday, January 2S, 19M 



Church News 



Rev. Tom Nelson Guest Speaker 
At Covenant Congregational 



At the 10:45 a.m. worship 
service at Covenant Congre- 
gational Church, Whitwell 
and Granite Sts., Rev. Tom 
Nelson of the Cape Cod 
Covenant Church will preach. 

This is part ot the First 
District pulpit exchange. Rev. 
Kathleen Graves, co-pastor 
with Rev. Kirk Johnson, will 
preach at the Waltham 
Covenant Church. 

The choir will be directed 
and accompanied on the 
organ by Richard Smith, 
Minster of Music. Luisa 
Dano will be soprano soloist. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for ages nursery 



through adult, will begin at 
9:30 a.m. During the worship 
service, a nursery is available 
for children age five and 
younger. The attendant will 
be Robert Purpura. For 
children up to age twelve there 
is junior church, led by Arlene 
Morse. 

Immediately following the 
service there will be a 
sandwich luncheon after 
which the annual meeting of 
the church will be held. The 
1990 budget and slate of 
officers will be presented. 

Activities for the week 
include the regularly 
scheduled Bible study on 
Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. at 



David and Linda Day's, the 
prayer service on Wednesdays 
at 6:30 p.m. at the church and 
choir rehearsal at 7 p.m. 

Coming events include an 
Ash Wednesday evening 
service Feb. 28 and a special 
Lenten lecture series March 
23-25. The lecturer will be Dr. 
F. Burton Nelson of Chicago 
and his subject will be 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer. 
Invitations will be extended to 
the various theological 
institutions in the greater 
Boston area. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 




REV. CHARLES LOGIE, at right, was installed Sunday as new pastor at Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church, Houghs Neck, by Bishop Daniel Hart, center. With them is Jack Menz, vice 
president of the Parish Council. 

((Jiiincy Sun i>hitlit h\ Charlvs h'hififii 

^Some Guilt Is Healthy' 
Sermon At Bethany Church 



St. Joseph School To Observe 
National Catholic Schools Week 



St. Joseph School in 
Quincy Point will join all 

other Catholic schools in the 
nation in celebrating National 

Catholic Schools week 
Sunday. Jan. 28 through 
Saturday, Feb. 3. 

Many activities are planned 
for the week. They include: 
Facultv breakfast by the 



student council as part of 
teacher appreciation day; and 
a playlet of St. Julie, 
foundress of Sisters of Notre 
Dame who are celebrating 150 
years of service in the United 
States this year. 

Registration for next year 
will also be held and a special 
open house. 

Highlight of the week will 



be a special Liturgy celebrated 
Wednesday, Jan. 31 at 11:45 
a.m. Celebrant will be Rev. 
Michael Steele from Catholic 
Schools Office. 

Concelebrants will be Rev. 
Joseph Downey, pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church; and Rev. 
Kevin Sepe, associate pastor. 

All parents, relatives and 
friends are welcome to attend. 



Asian Cultural Festival 
At Beechwood Center Feb. 10 



There will be two worship 
services Sunday, in Bethany 
Congregational Church, Cod- 
dington and Spear Sts., Qui- 
ncy Center, at 9 a.m. in the 
chapel and at 10 a.m. in the 
sanctuary. 

The Rev. J William Arnold, 
senior minister, will preach 
the sermon at both services 
on the subject "Some Guilt is 
Healthy." 

The lay scripture readers 
will be Lois Nordstrom in the 
chapel and Linda Nicholson 
in the sanctuary. 

At the sanctuary service. 



the Chancel Choir will be 
directed by Charles J. Blue, 
Sr. 

The Sunday School will be 
in session from 10 to 11 a.m. 
with classes for pre-school 
through ninth grade. Child 
care is also provided for 
babies and toddlers. 

Beginning at II a.m. imm- 
ediately following the late 
worship service, a fellowship 
time with light refreshments 
will be held in the Allen 
parlor. 
' '■ ' ' ' -i"H families from 



the area are welcome to att- 
end the worship and fellow- 
ship, and to enroll children in 
the Sunday School. 

On Tuesday evening, Jan. 
30, from 7:30 to 9:00p.m. 
Pastor Arnold will lead the 
continuing Bible Study group 
on "Peter, a Journey of Fai- 
th."' The study is open to 
everyone and is held in room 
3 of the Parish House. 

For additional information 
on Bethany's programs and 
ministry, contact the church 
office at 479-7300. 



An Asian cultural festival is 
scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 
10 from 12:30 to 4 p.m. at 
Beechwood Community Life 

I Umon Cwigrt^tional I 
' Church of Wolhsfon 

Beach Street at Rawson Fi d 

Chvrch School 9 a.m. 
Sun. Worship 10 am. 

479-6661 (Child Care Provided) 
Rev Zaven [)ohanian. Pastor 

Join Us In Foith 
and Fellowship 



Center, 225 Fenno St., 
Quincy. 

Dancers, musicians, food 
and craft vendors will 
represent aspects of 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner Southern Artery 
and Wastiington St . Quincy 

Owrdi SdMol 9:30 AJl 
Woniii|i«t 10:30 AJL 

Rev Fred Atwood-Lyon 

Rev Ca'Ol E Atv»(00d-Lyon 

773-6424 (Child Care provided) 

Call The Daily Bible 4/2-4434 



traditional and contemporary 
Asian culture. 

Admission to the event is 
free. Transportation is 
available. Those interested 
should call Beechwoodat 471- 
5712 for more information. 

The festival is sponsored by 
the Quincy Arts Council and 
the Heritage Program of the 
Mass. Council for the Arts 
and Humanities. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Church School Open House 
At First Parish Unitarian 



United First Parish Unit- 
arian Church School will hold 
their annual Open House 
Sunday. Jan. 28, at 11:30 
a.m.. after the morning ser- 
vice. Children will show their 
projects, and Religious Educ- 
ation Committee members 
and teachers will answer 
questions about curricula 
and programs. 

Anticipating the Open Ho- 
use Dr. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister, v%ill deliver the 



The Covenant Congregational Church 

315 Whitwell Street. Quincy 

I 

Invites YOU to worship 
with them each Sunday 

Morning Worship 

10:45 a.m. 

Rev. Kathl*«n J. Grave* 

Rev. Kirk E. Johnson 

PMtors 







CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHURCH 



^ 



65 Washington Street 
Quincy, IMA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

Sunday School 9:30 am 

Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. 

Evening Service 6:00 p m. 

Wed. Evenings 7:00 p.m 
Bible Study & Prayer Service 

10:45 AM: Speaker: Pastor John Mantle 
Where is God when i need Him? 

6:00 PM: Speaker: Pastor Robert Zarges 
Individualism vs. Duty 

Affiliated with: Baptist General Conference 
tJortfteast Baptist Conference 



sermon"The Great End of 
Religious Education" during 
ihc service beginning at 
lOr.lO a.m. 

The Youth Group, for teen- 
agers, is field testing "What 
Are We and What Do We 
Stand For?", a new UUA 

curriculum teaching the 
principles of Unitarian 
Universalism and its history. 
Brenda Powers will represent 
the Youth Group teachers. 

Representing the Le\cl I 
teachers will be Cynthia 
Cramer and Josce Sullivan. 
I heir class, ages 4-6. is using 

"Tell Me A Story." a liter- 
ature based on curriculum 
that teaches children U.U. 
values. Children's Craft pro- 
jects will also be on display. 
The Level 2 class, ages 7- 
!>'"•. will be represented by 
'cachcrs Amy Ross and Jane 
Molloy. Their curriculum, 
"What is Religion-For others 
and for Us?", acquaints 
'lie children with religious 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 
Now ... 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informal look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist. 44 School St., Quincy 773-1021 







Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School St. Quincy, Mats 

PASTOR 
Rev. William R. McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev. James C. Tuxbury 

Rev. Gary S. Sullivan 

Rev. Richard McEntee 

Rev. Theodore L. Fortier 

(Quincy City Hospital Chaplain) 

Rev. Mr. Chartet Sullivan, 



concepts and language and 
provides opportunities to 
practice their values. Pro- 
jects on display will include a 
survey of Quincy churches, a 
poster with concepts of God. 
and a Buddhist prayer with 
the paper flowers made to 
use in a prayer ceremony. 
Cclia Blight will discuss the 
curriculum. "That Book-Thc 
Bible." Part 1: The Old 
Testament is being studied 
by the level 3 group, ages 1 1 
lo 1.1. The children will 
display a giant whale made 
for the story of .lonah. a 
nativity wall hanging, and a 
ceiling-high Tower of Babel. 
The Nursery, which inclu- 
des a loft hide-away slide 
made by the Church School 
parents, will also be open to 

visitors. 
The regular Social Hour 

with refreshments will be 
held downstairs in the dining 
nuim near the class rooms. 

Visitors are welcome to 
attend and learn more about 
U.U. religious education and 
United First Parish Church 
School. For more inform- 
mation, call the church office 
at 773-1290 or Brenda Chin. 
Church School Director, at 
479-1577. The church is loc- 
ated at 1306 Hancock St. in 
Ouincv Center. 



'1 



(Oaacon) 

MASS SCHEDULE 



baturday 400 & 7:00 pm 
Sunday: 7:00. 9:00 am, 1 1 am, 12:30 and 5 30 pm ^ 
Weel< Days: 8 am and 5:30 pm 



Confessions in Chapel 
Sat 3-3 45 PM 
Rectory-21 Gay St 



Wollaston Church 
of the f Nazarene 





37 E. Elm A»«., Wollaaton 

— Sarvica* — 

Sunday 11:00 a.m. A 600 p.m. 

Wadnaaday - 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church 



Thursday, January 25, 1999 Quincy Sun Pa(c IJ 



Tips for looking your best on your wedding day 



There are more weddings than ever 
before, according to the Association ot 
Bridal Consuhants. Approximately 2.5 
million couples were married in 1988. 

Preparing for your wedding day takes 
months of planning — from the ceremony 
and reception to the long-awaited honey- 
moon. This also h(.)lds true for looking 
your best on your wedding day. 

"If brides want to look their best on 
this special day, they will need to plan 
ahead, from taking care of their skin to 
testing their makeup," explams Linda 
Harris, vice president of product devel- 
opment for L'Oreal Cosmetics. 

The experts at LOreal offer the fol- 
lowing skincare regimen and makeup lips 
to ensure that every bride will look her 
best on her wedding day. 

The first step to looking your best be- 
gins with radiant, healthy skin, which 
does not happen overnight. The months 

leading up to your wedding day are a 
good time to start taking care of your 
skin for the big day and for the rest of 
your life. 

Skincare regimen 

When you wake up in the morning, 
cleanse your skin thoroughly with a gen- 
tle, but effective cleanser to remove any 
dirt particles that have accumulated dur- 
mg the night. 

If you have oily skin, use a cleansing 
gel; for dry skin, use a cleansing cream. 
Brides with normal skin can use either. 
Bar soaps, Harris explains, can be harsh 
and strip the skin of its natural oils, leav- 
ing the skin very dry. 

Then, apply a good moisturizer under 
your foundation. For winter, use a 
heavier, more emollient moisturizer to 
combat dryness. In the spring and sum- 
mer months, you may prefer a lighter or 
oil-tree moisturizer. 

If your honeymoon plans call for a 
warm climate, be sure to use a lighter 
moisturizer with sunscreens. You'll also 
want to take moisturizer on the plane 
with you to replenish your skin. 

Harris suggests using the high per- 
formance and affordably-priced Pleni- 
tude line of cleansing, moisturizing and 
special care products, available in tubes, 
which are great for honeymoon travel, 
and jars, for at-home use. 

France's number one skincare collec- 
tion. Plenitude, was recently introduced 
into the U.S. at drugstores nationwide, 
conveniently located for the bride to be. 

Makeup tips 

Now that the skin is cleansed and 
moisturized, your face is properly pre- 
pared for makeup application. L'Oreal 
suggests practice makeup sessions 
months before the wedding day and ex- 
perimentation with different makeup col- 
ors depending on the season of your 
wedding. 

One easy and cost-free way is by using 
the "testers" at your local drugstore. 




THE CLASSIC BRIDE looks her best with fre§h, radiant-lookin|{ skin, highlighted 
by ruby red lips and softly defined eyes. Her updated hairstyle complements her 
traditional veil and wedding dress. Photo credit: Reprinted with permission from 
Colors far Brides, by Lauren Smith, published by Acropolis Books Ltd., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20009 

soft, smudgeable, and easy-to-use eye- 
liner pencil. Then, blend the eye shadow 
and pencil together with your finger for a 
subtle look. 

Finally, the lips. Apply a light powder 
under your lipstick to prevent cracking 
and to ensure the lipstick lasts longer. 
Then apply your lipstick. For an extra 
shine, add a light coat of gloss to your 
lips. 

Beautiful nails 



This will guarantee that on your special 
day, and for the cherished and everlast- 
ing wedding photographs and/or video, 
your makeup will look perfect. 

First, apply a foundation under your 
makeup that is the same shade as your 
natural skin tone. L'Oreal's Mattique Il- 
luminating Matte Makeup offers a less 
"made up" look while allowing the natu- 
ral glow of your skin to show through. 

To help your makeup appear fresh all 
day and stay on longer, apply a light dust- 
ing of loose powder to your face. Then, 
apply a blush to your cheekbones in an 
upward, sweeping motion, and to your 
forehead, chin and to the tip of your 
nose. 

For those emotional, teary-eyed mo- 
ments, waterproof mascara will come in 
handy. For eye shadow, se' .'t colors that 
will define your eyes, isui will appear 
soft-looking in photographs. Apply a 



For the bride to have strong, beautiful 
nails, she will have to plan ahead. One 
product. Grow Strong!, builds stronger 
and longer nails in just 10 days, allowing 
every bride to have well-manicured nails. 

Now that you've prepared your skin 
and tested your makeup, you're ready to 
be a beautiful, radiant bride. Most of all, 
have fun and enjoy your very special day. 

BR904925 



An Unusual Gift 
For The Bride 



In this twentieth ccniurx, 
porringers arc becoming 
la\orite silver gills at 
weddings. But the first 
porringers were made in the 
1 7th cenlur\ for eating 
porridge, which was not 
oatmeal but a kind of stev\ 
with meat and vegetables. 



In l.ngland, the porringer 
had two handles, in America, 
it only had one handle and 
was used lor all sorts of tood 
items, including sugar, before 
the advent of sugar bowls. 

Now you will find the 
porringer used for everything 
from an ash tray to a nut dish - 
but rarely for "porridge." 




Say 



«i 



*I LOVE YOU TRULY" 

with 

BARON HUGO 
AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

698-9047 or 48^4S50 




Youmcordklly 
invited to view 

Brides 

1990 



Some thoughts on marriage . 

A happy marriage is a long conversation 
which always seems too short. 

—Andre Maurois 
By all means marry; if you get a good 
wife, you 'II become happy. If you get a 
had one, you 'II become a philosopher 

—Socrates 
Love is much nicer to be in than an auto- 
mobile accident, a tight girdle, a higher 
tax bracket or a holding pattern over 
Philadelphia. 

—Judith Viorst 
Marriage is a great institution, but I 'm not 
ready for an institution. 

— Mae West 
Marriage is hardly a thing that one can do 
now and then— except in America. 

—Oscar Wilde 
Marriage is the ultimate goal of love. 

—George Sand 

Marriage. The beginning and the end are 
wonderful. But the middle part is hell. 
— Enid Bagnold 
By the time you swear you 're his. 
Shivering and sighing. 
And he vows his passion is 
Infinite, undying— 
Lady, make a note of this: 
One of you is lying. 

— Dorothy Parker 
Never go to bed mad. Stay up and fight. 

—Phyllis Oilier 
It 's hobbies you pursue together. 
Savings you accrue together. 
Looks you misconstrue together — 
TJiat make marriage a joy. 

— Stephen Sondheim 

/ gave up a throne for the woman I loved. 

— The Duke of Windsor 



' ioi the WEDDING H^ 



Artistically designed for you 
on your .special day 
at reasonable rates 

We also do long lasting 
silk arrangements 

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ESTABLISHED 1919 

761 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QIINCY, MASS. 02169 

FTD WORLD WIDE Tel. 7737620 




Quintree 
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Let us show you how 
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Specializing in Fresh and Silks 
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Store Hours: Tucs, Wed. & Thurs 10-9 

Friday & Saturday 10-5 



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owns 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1990 




mum 



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A new decade of weddings: Style and 

As the times change, so do the 
styles for the brides of the '90s 

@The biides of" the '90s are not as traditional as tfiosc of the past. Because more 
women arc getting married after they have established careers and independence, 
their ideas about their weddings are very different from those of brides of past dec- 
ades. 

Today's bride and groom are more apt to pay for their own wedding than before. 
The days of the mother of the bride making all the arrangements, the father of the 
bride paying ail the bills, and the groom representing only the figure on top of the 
wedding cake, are long gone 



Modern brides are professional 
women, marrying at an older age, after 
they have established their careers and 
therefore, they are more able to afford 
the high prices that a wedding can incur. 
Today, decisions, expenses and choices 
are shared between the bride and groom. 

A personal touch 

Another difference between the brides 
of yesterday and those of today is in their 
choices of ceremony. Fewer brides 
choose the traditional ceremony: instead, 
they opt for a more personal touch. 
Many brides and grooms write their own 
vows or choose a different type of cere- 
mony, such as the candle lighting cere- 
mony which represents the union of the 
two families. 

The modern wedding may also differ 
in its music. The traditional choice of 
"Here Comes the Bride" is no longer the 
popular favorite: many brides have cho- 
sen softer melodies from current music 
or Broadway themes for use as their en- 
trance song. The use of a singer before 
the start of the ceremony has also be- 
come very popular, adding a more per- 
sonal touch to the joyous event. 

Colorful difference 

The styles and colors that today's 
brides choose reflect the most obvious 
change from previous years. Gone are 
the pastel and earthy tones and flowing 
styles that were the craze during the 
"SOs — the 'QOs bring form-fitting gowns 
with more vibrant colors onto the scene 
and into today's wedding party. . 



More shades of iridescent blue, red 
and purple can be seen in the current col- 
lections by the designers. One recent ad- 
dition to the color of bridesmaid's gowns 
is black. Black-and-white weddings, as 
well as all white (or "snowball") wed- 
dings, have become very popular in the 
past year. 

The look of accessories is also chang- 
ing as we head into the '90s. Glamour 
and detail have taken over where dainty 
and delicate left off. The modern bride 
can look forward to plenty of lace and 

pearls adorning her stockings and veil as 
well as sequins and rhinestones in her 
jewelry. 

The new designs in wedding bands 
hold more gems and detail than the un- 
adorned traditional solid band that has 
been worn in the past. The latest trend in 
wedding bands for women is the ring 
guard that wraps around the engagement 
ring and usually holds clusters of dia- 
monds or other precious gems. This new 
style is becomitig increasingly popular 
with the modern bride and is even being 
purchased as a wedding gitt from the 
groom to the bride. 

(Iroonis get involved 

More grooms are becoming invol\ed in 
all aspects of wedding planning, includ- 
ing the selection of the bride's gown. 
Many brides are now asking their fiances 
to accompany them when they go to 
choose their gown— the age-old super- 
stition of bad luck coming upon a bride 
who has been seen in her gown* by her 
groom is no longer a worrv for tHe bride 
of the '90s. 





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Thursday, January 25. IWO Quincy Sun Page 15 





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'i 




FANTASY 

HONEYMOON 

IN HAWAII 

@A new fantasy resort. Hyatt Regency 
Waikoloa. is a S360-milli()n resort on 
Fantasy Island come true. 

Its three-night honeymoon package of- 
fers ocean- view room, champagne on ar- 
rival and breakfast in bed. It is $968 per 
couple, including baggage handling and 
tax. Extra nights are $285 for the room, 
with tax additional. 

$10,000 Ultimate 

Want the "Ultimate Dream" honey- 
moon? It's $10,000 per couple for four 
memorable nights. 

Stay in the Presidential Suite, dine in 
any of the resort's eight restaurants, en- 
joy massages and pampering treatments 
at the spa. A limousine is at your beck 
and call. 

Options are dinner for two on a private 
yacht and a helicopter ride over active 
volcanoes on Hawaii's Big Island. 

They bought two! 

One newlywed couple liked this pack- 
age so much they to-'k two— for $20,000, 
staying eight nights. 

For more information and reserva- 
tions, call Hyatt Worldwide Reservations 
at 800-223-1234. BR904933 




raiwiiy 



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A 




THE WEDDING OF 
YOUR DREAMS 

AT THE QUINCY 
SOCIAL CENTER 

YOUR WEDDING WILL BE JUST AS YOU HAVE ALWAYS IMA- 
GINED. AT THE QUINCY SOCIAL CENTER. YOU MAY SELECT EACH 
DELUXE SaI^PLANS^ CELEBRATION OR CHOOSE ONE OF OUR 

, J'"^ '^ '''O'J*^ SPECIAL DAY. YOU WILL RECEIVE THE PERSONAL 
ATTENTION OF OUR BRIDAL CONSULTANT WHO WILL HELP YOU 
MAKE THIS YOUR PERFECT DAY 

FOR THAT JUST RIGHT RECEPTION. CALL RITA AT 472-5900 
MON.-FRI. 11 A.M. to 3 P.M. EVE. HOURS BY APPT. 

QUINCY SONS OF ITALY SOCIAL CENTER 

1 20 QUARRY STREET. QUINCY. MA 02 1 69 




rage 16 Quincy Sun lliursday, January 2S. 1990 




• 



/■/"'^ ^ 



/.; 





COUPLES should be billing to let iheir imaginaliuns lake hold when they register 
for gifts at their local bridal registry, items that they might never purchase for 
themselves, but would love to have, are the perfect choice. For instance, this handy 
egg cooker is an easy-to-use item that will make breakfasts quick and easy for the 
newlyweds. And, guests looking for a unique gift will love it! 



YOU'RE INVITED... to join After Six Fomials in celebrating the newest addition to 
the family. Look for the newest After Six Wedding Invitation Catalog, as advertised 
in the national bridal magazines. This beautiful edition features not only the most 
gorgeous selection of invitations and bridal party gift items, but also important in- 
formation concerning gowns, tuxedos, flowers and cakes; in essence, every aspect of 
that most special day, your wedding. For your free copy, call 1 (800) 777-6646. 
From this day forward, happily ever After Sixl BR904934 



Plenty of Free Parking beside Our Store 




AIELLO 



122 Water St. 
Quincy 479-6360 

Try our 
ready to bake: 

Lasagna 

IManicotti 

Stuffed Stiells 

—Perfect For Wedding Buffets— 



Lasting marriage in an age of divorce 



@The baby boom generation, unique in 
many ways, also claims this distinction: 
It is the first to have come of age at a 
time when one out of two marriages in 
this country ended in divorce— an all- 
time high. Today, the children of the 
"Age of Divorce" are themselves of mar- 
rying age. Surprisingly, they are tradi- 
tional, optimistic, and marrying in 
record numbers, according to Bride's 
magazine. 

It's no longer chic to bad-mouth mar- 
riage. Today, people speak approvingly 
about commitment and fidelity. 

Characteristic of many of the couples 
marrying today is their renewed sense of 
commitment and determination to make 
their marriages work because the mem- 
ory and possibility of divorce is never far 
away. Children of divorce are more 



aware of the problems of marriage, and 
they often try harder to avoid these prob- 
lems. 

Of course, some scars remain. "Di- 
vorce has colored our attitude toward 
marriage." !^ys Art Carey, author of the 
Bride's article. "Some of us have em- 
braced marriage too impetuously, hoping 
to escape our pasts by creating the Icind 
of 'perfect' relationship our parents 
never had. Others, frightened by the fra- 
gility of marriage, and skeptical about 
the possibility of a lasting, happy mar- 
riage, have avoided marriage, and any- 
thing approaching it." 

Need for intimacy 

Still, nine out of ten young adults will 
marry at least once during their lifetime, 
predicts Andrew Cherlin. author oi Mar- 



riage, Divorce, Remarriage. "People have 
a deep-seated need for the kind of se- 
cure, long-term, intimate relationship 
that marriage promises." 

A time of adjustment 

Finally, as a by-product of the age of 
divorce, marriage today has become 
much more flexible. The modern defini- 
tion of marriage embraces not only the 
traditional husband/wife roles, but also 
marriages in which both partners work, 
marriages in which there are no children, 
and marriages in which the father stays 
home to care for the children. Couples 
today feel free to form creative partner- 
ships, based on love and friendship, that 
can be molded and shaped to meet their 
needs. BRW5IH7 







r-N^ 



GEORGE'S EXPERT 
TAILORS AND CLEANERS 

139 WASHINGTON ST., QUINCY 773-5999 

When you look sharp, you'll feel sharp, and you'll always 
look sharp when your clothes are tailored and kept clean 
by George's Expert Tailoring, 136 
Washington Street, Quincy. George 
and Zanetta have been offering the 
best tailoring and the finest cleaning 
service on the South Shore for over 
15 years. 

Zanetta invites you to bring your 
mother's old wedding gown in, she'll 
bring back memories by altering the 
gown to fit you perfectly. 

See George or Zanetta, 
the experts in all wedding tailoring 








Jioweu iff 76eieH 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
SPECIALIZING IN WEDDINGS 



# 



367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MA 02170 

471-3772 




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FUNCTIONS 

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1 



•v= 



=*#= 






Night To Remember 

North Upsets 
Brockton 



niunday, Juimry 25, IfM Qaktey Sun Page 17 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Last Friday night was one 
to remember for the North 
Quincy boys basketball team. 

Led by Erik DeBoer, who 
continued his phenomenal 



sprained ankle and did not 
return. 

"It was a big factor as he is 
one of the best in Eastern 
Mass. and we missed his 
scoring, rebounding, si/e and 



■ »' — ■"o* ^t*.\f uiiu 

performances, Ted Stevenson's experience. But I don't want 
Raiders upset Brockton, 55- to take anything away from 



50, after having little success 
against the Boxers in recent 
years. The win improved 
North's record to 5-6. 

North has two of its most 
important games this week, 
playing two of the three top 
Suburban League teams. The 
Raiders played at Newton 
North Tuesday and will play 
at Cambridge Rindge and 
Latin Friday afternoon at 
3:30. They will be idle next 
Tuesday. 

DeBoer, averaging nearly 
20 points a game and the 
number three scorer in the 
league, scored 25 points and 
took down 17 rebounds and 
clinched the win with a three- 
pointer from the side with 47 
seconds left and North 
leading only 50-48. 

"1 wouldn't have let anyone 
else shoot that shot in that 
circumstance," said a happy 
Stevenson, who earned his 
first win over Brockton in 10 
tries. "He's a great player and 
to think he is an even better 
baseball player." 

DeBoer, a co-captain, 
earlier had beaten Waltham 
with a shot from three-quarter 
court at the buzzer. "I never 
saw anything like that, it must 
have traveled about 75 feet," 
Stevenson said. 

Last spring DeBoer was 
one of the top pitchers in the 
Suburban League and led 
North to the league title and 
Morrisette Legion to second 
place in Zone 6. He should 
have another brilliant season 
this spring. 

"DeBoer is a great shooter 
both inside and outside," 
Stevenson said. "He was 
hitting from inside against 
Brockton and when they 
shifted their defense, he hit 
from outside. You just can't 
stop him." 

"He was tough both from 
the inside and outside," said 
Brockton coach Vic Ortiz. 
"When he hit that three- 
pointer, it nailed it down for 
them." 

Brockton received a tough 
break when its top scorer. 
Curt Bostic (22 points a game) 
went out of the game late in 
the first quarter with a 



the outstanding job that Ted 
did in preparing his team for 
us," said Ortiz. 

Brockton had a 15-14 edge 
after a quarter when Andre 
Garner hit a three-pointer 
with three seconds left. 
North's stifling pressure took 
its toll in the second and third 
quarters as the Raiders held 
the Boxers to 1 1 points in the 
second and seven in the third. 

DeBoer led the way with 18 
of his team's 30 points in the 
first half, including a super 25- 
foot turnaround three-pointer 
at the halftime buzzer, giving 
North a 30-26 lead. 

North opened up a 12-point 
lead (40-28) in the third on a 
Dan McLean jumper and held 
Brockton to just two field 
goals until the Boxers' Paul 
Brewer hit a half-court three- 
pointer with two seconds left 
in the quarter. 

Brockton closed to within 
two, 50-48, and DeBoer came 
through with his three-pointer 
to ice it. 

Freshman Sean Donovan 
had 10 points, including two 
crucial three-pointers. 

"We should have a better 
record as two of our first three 
games were lost by two points 
and one by three," Stevenson 
said. "We just made too many 
mistakes in those games. 

"Jeff Calvert, our other co- 
captain, has been superb on 
defense as have Dave 
Cawthorne and Billy Warren. 
Cawthorne has been a very 
pleasant surprise. Donovan 
has been playing well and 
Angelo Kyranis has been 
improving and has been 
scoring well." 

Earlier last week North lost 
to Brookline, unbeaten league 
leaders at the time (Newton 
North upset them Friday), 65- 
52. 

The difference in the game 
was Brookline outscoring the 
Raiders, 24-13, in the second 
quarter. 

Brookline's Victor Koytiky 
scored 10 of his 21 points in 
that quarter. 

DeBoer again was North's 
leading scorer with 22 points 
and Kvranis added 13. 



Rice Hits 1000 
Mark At ENC 



Senior Jonathan Rice, a 
former Patriot Ledger and 
Brockton Enterprise all- 
scholastic, recently scored his 
lOOOth career point for 
the Eastern Nazarene College 
basketball team. 

A 1986 graduate of 
Whitman-Hanson Regional 



High School, Rice is ENCs 
leading scorer with an average 
of 18.6 points a game. 

A physical education 
major, he plans to teach and 
coach both basketball and 
baseball after graduating in 
May. 



I 



.00* 




/ 



COLLEEN TOLAND, left and her sister, Bridget of Quincy 
were members of the Suffuil( University women's cross 
country team. Colleen eraduated from North Quincy High in 



1988 and Bridget in 1989. They are daughters of Robert and 
Patricia Toland. 



Sun Sports 



Victory Eludes Quincy 



The winless Quincy boys' 
basketball team turned in 
another good performance 
but again failed to enter the 
win column as it lost to 
Waltham, 50-44, last Friday, 
dropping its record to 0-11. 

TVip Presidents played 



Brookline Tuesday, will host 
Brockton Friday night at 

7:30 and will play at 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 

next Tuesday afternoon at 
3:30. 

John Franceschlni's 



Quincy team has been in 
nearly every game this year 
but has faded in the second 
half in most games. Poor 
shooting has been a major 
factor in its failure to win but 
the team has continued to give 
100 nercent in every game. 



Mike Scolaro had a good 
night for the Presidents with 
13 points and six rebounds 

and Joe Russell had nine 
points and six assists. Mark 

Bogan turned in an excellent 
defensive effort. 



Brockton Girls Too 
Much For North 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team, following a 
50-45 victory over Brookline, 
found Brockton's undefeated 
Suburban League leaders too 
much last Friday and suffered 
one of its worst defeats in 
some time, 73-32, dropping its 
record to 7-4. 

The North girls will host 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
Friday at 5 o'clock and will be 
home to Canton m a non- 



league game Tuesday at 6:30. 

The Brockton girls (11-0) 

had too much size and 

experience for North, which 
scored only 12 first half 
points. 

Kerry Tolson led North 
with 12 points and Tara Miles 
added eight. 

North trailed Brookline, 
14-13. after a quarter and still 
trailed, 22-19, at the half. 



North came out in the 
second half with a full court 
pressure defense and 

outscored Brookline, 15-9, in 
the third quarter to take a 34- 
31 lead into the final session. 
During the third quarter 

Tricia Hughes scored seven 
points. In the final quarter 
North had a 16-14 edge. 

Leading the way for North 
was Miles with 14 points. 



Hughes scored 13, Tolson 10 
and Kara Sullivan seven. 
Christine Salton had two 
points and Kristen Haddigan 
one. Joanna Rugnetta had 
three points, seven rebounds 
and seven blocked shots. 

During the second half 
Sullivan drew the assignment 
of shadowing Brookline's top 
scorer, Terry Gomez, and 
held her to only four points. 



Quincy Girls Lose To Waltham 



The Quincy girls' basket- 
ball team fell behind, 22-5, in 
the opening quarter and 
couldn't make up the deficit as 
it lost to Waltham, 56-45, last 



Fridav. dropping its record to 
2-9. 

Quincy closed the gap to six 
points, 39-33, but Waltham 
scored the last four points of 



the third quarter. 

Amy Baker had 12 points 
and Erin Doherty added 10 
for the Quincy girls. 

Waltham had a decided 



advantage at the free throw 
line, hitting on 17 of 22 shots 
while Quincy was six for 12, 
accounting for the difference 
in the score. 



Auerbach Track Meet Saturday, Sunday 



The annual Red Auerbach 
freshman-sophomore de- 
velopmental track meet will 
be held Saturday, Jan. 27, and 
Sunday, Jan. 28, at MIT. 



The large schools will 
compete on Saturday and the 
small schools on Sunday. 

The meet is again directed 
bv former North Quincy track 



and cross country coach Lou 
Tozzi. 

Last year 1636 athletes 
from 181 schools competed 
and it is expected this year's 



meet will attract even more. 

Among those competing 
will be a large number of 
North Quincy girls. 



FOOTBALL 

BASEBALL 

HOCKEY 

SOCCER - 

CAMPING 
Canton Hanover 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thuraday, January 2S, ivvtf 

Track 

North Girls Shine 
At Coaches Meet 



The North Quincy girls' 
track team spht a pair of 
Suburban League meets, then 
turned in some outstanding 
performances in the Girls' 
State Coaches Invitational 
Meet at Harvard. 

The Raiderettes lost to 
powerful Cambridge Rindge 
and Latin, always a league 
jower. 56-30, despite most of 
them turning in their best 
performances of the year. 

Sherrin Qu'itiliani won the 
mile and Janet Corrigan won 
the two-mile. Taking seconds 
were Triston Mastrogiacomo 
in the hurdles. Amy Wong in 
the dash. Su/anne Lewis in 
the lOOOand Joan Moriartyin 
the two-mile. Placing third 
were Kelli Gott in the hurdles, 
Cindy Walsh in the mile, liana 
Cobban in the 1000, Jenn 
Flynn in the 600, Su/anne 
Hamilton in the 300 and high 
jump, Danielle Lewis in the 
two-mile and Mastrogiacomo 
in the shot put. 

The North girls evened 
their record at 2-2 with a 
controversial 44-42 victory 
over Brookline. 

An unexpected sweep of the 
high jump by Brookline took 
the meet down to the final 

Pa 



event, the mile relay. When 
Brookline's leadoff runner 
switched lanes too soon the 
team was disqualified, giving 
the Raiderettes the win. 

Mastrogiacomo won the 
hurdles and shot put. Wong 
won the dash. Su/anne Lewis 
won the two-mile and the 
relay team of Wong, 
Hamilton, Cobban and 
Quintiliani also won. 

Placing second were 
Quintiliani in the mile, Cindy 
Walsh in the 1000. Jennifer 
Nutley in the 300 and Alana 
Crehan in the shot put. 

Taking third places were 
Gott in the hurdles. Hamilton 
in the dash. Moriarty in the 
mile, Claire Walsh in the 
1000. Amanda Young in the 
600. Janet Corrigan in the 
two-mile and Voula Regas in 
the shot put. 

Several girls qualified for 
the state championships and a 
number of personal bests were 
turned in at the coaches meet. 

The highlight for North was 
Quintiliani finishing fourth in 
the two-mile in 1 1:58.5. "This 
was by far her best 
performance to date," said 
coach Jeff Hennessy. "We've 
brought her along slowly after 

rker School PTO 



her injury in the fall. She is 
still only running 25 minutes a 
day and doing one easy track 
workout a week. But this 
proves she is back. She settled 
a lot of scores in this meet." 

Freshman Su/anne Lewis 

was eighth in the mile in 

5:31.3; Nutley. another 

freshman, qualified for the 

states with a 42.1 in the 300 

and Young, who missed three 

months of action with various 

health problems, appears to 

be back at full strength with a 

1:39.0 in the 600 to qualify for 
the states. 

The mile relay team of 
Wong, Nutley. Hamilton and 
Lewis ran a 4:38.3 to qualify 
for the states. 

The North girls faced 
Newton North Tuesday and 
will wind up the league 
schedule next Tuesday 
against Quincy. 

They will have 30 of their 
many talented freshmen and 
sophomores in the annual 
Red Auerbach Development 
Meet Saturday, Jan. 27 at 
MIT. The meet is directed by 
former North coach Lou 
To//i. 

-- TOM SULLIVAN 



Offering Lottery Scholarship 

The F, W. Parker School scholarship for this year's graduated from the Parker 
P.T.O. is offering a lottery high school graduates who School. 

Applications are available 
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Deadline is April 10. 




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1372 Hancock Stroet, Qviiicy Squort 471-3100 



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Quincy Youtli Hocltey 



Squirt House 

Doran Sinks Sun, 
Takes Slim Lead 



the Squirt House l.cat-ue 
has started the second half ot 
the season and Doran & 
Horrigan holds a one-point 
lead. 

Doran defeated Ihe 
Quinc\ Sun, 7-4, on gaols by 
Brian Dvgan, A.J. Quinn, 
Owen Nestor. Mike Ryan, 
Dennis Allen, Charis 
O'Donnell and Pual Printiotto. 
Princiotto, Jason Snaith, lim 
lewis. Nestor, Ryan and 
Robbie Pirelli had assists. 
Brian dales, Jeff Spear, John 
Manning and Jeff Coleman 
scored for Ihe Sun with 
assists for Spear and 
Manning. 

Johnson Motor Parts 
defeated Burgin Platner, 7-2, 
as Ryan I'rada scored two 

• Mite House 



goals and Mati I^ngille, Jim 
Hasson. Bill Barron, Mike 
(iailagher and Danny .Stone 
one apiece. Billy (iraney, I im 
Hunter and l.angiile had two 
assists apiece and Barron, 
S I e \ e V e r I i c c o , Malt 
McDonough, Patrick Coughlin, 
Brian Beaton, Matt Jarnis 
and Hasson one each. Dann\ 
Stock and Joe Bracken scored 
for Burgin and Fim Shechan 
and Mike O'Brien had assists. 
Doran & Horrigan also 
topped Johnson, 7-4, as 
Quinn had a hat trick and 
Nestor and Allen two goals 
each. Nestor and Quinn had 
assists. Prada, Hasson, 
Coughlin and Jarnis scored 
for Johnson and Hunter had 
two assists and Coughlin and 



McDonough one each. 

I he Sun and Burgin 
Platner fought to a 7-7 lie. 
David Rowell had two goals 
and Mark DiBiasi. Brad 
Macauley, Spear, Mark 
(ilynn and Rich Perona one 
each lor ihe Sun. Manning 
had two assists and (ilynn, 
Perona, DiBiasi and Dan 
O'Donnell one each. Kor 
Burgin Malt Rad/evich, 
Shechan and Robbie Winter 
had two goals apiece and 
Bracken one. Jon Haddad 
had two assists and Danny 
Hughes, Rad/evich, Bracken 
and O'Brien one each. 

Ihe standings: Doran & 
Horrigan, 2-1-0; Quincy Sun, 
I- 1- 1; Burgin Plainer, I- 1- 1; 
Johnson Motor, 1-2-0. 



Purdy, Balducci Tie 



Purdy's Ice Cream and 
Balducci's played to a 2-2 tie 
in the Mite House League. 

Patrick Grogan and 
Andrew Boyd scored for 
Purdy s and Matt Allen had 
two assists. Paul Flynn and 
Chad Fitzpatrick scored for 
Balducci's and Mike Powers 



had an assist. 

Rogan Hennessy defeated 
N.V. Survey, 4-1, as Sean 
Garvey scored two goals and 
Chris Haidul and Bob Harvey 
one each. Billy Norris had an 
assist. Jimmy Sullivan scored 
for Survey. 

John Barron's hat trick led 



Lydon-Russell to a 4-3 win 
over the Paul Harold Club. 
Pat McGann had the other 
goal and also had three 
assists. Barron and Brian 
Nolan also had assists. Matt 
O'Connell scored all three 
Harold goals and Matt 
Gibbons had an assist. 



Pee Wee As Win 
In Double Overtime 



Quincy's Pec Wcc A hockey 
(cam. sponsored bv the Elks, 
edged Needham, 3-2, in 
double overtime. 

Danny Donahue scored the 
winning goal unassisted. 

Pal Connolly and Joe 
McPhce had the other goals 
and Doug Nolan and David 
Cooper had assists. 



The loss eliminated Need- 
ham from the state plav- 
dovvns. 

The Pee Wee A's also de- 
feaicd Charlestown, 10-0, to 
remain unbeaten in ihe 
Greater Boston League. 

Cooper and Billy Coughlin 
had hat tricks and David 
Pacino, Nolan. Chris Gearv 



and Hric Zimnicrnian had a 
goal apiece. Donahue had 
iliree assists. Zimmerman 
and .lay Fvans two each and 
.Sle\c Prt>\(>sl, Pacino, Lee 
Hughes, Connolly, Andrew 
Vermetle and Scoii 

MacPherson one apiece. 
Dennis Palcras and goalie 
Mike Manganaro were oul 
standing. 



Squirt As Breeze 



Quincy's Squirt A Hockey 
team, sponsored by South 
Boston Savings Bank, rolled 
over Somcrville, 10-1 . in a 
Greater Boston League game 
as Tom Sullivan and Erie 
Wood had four-point games. 



Sullivan had a hat trick and 
an assist and Wood two goals 
and two assists. Joe Bracken, 
Mike O'Brien. Robbie Pirelli, 
John Ryan and John 
Manning had a goal apiece. 
Tim Wood, Manning, and 



Quincy Sun 
Route Available 
in Quincy Point 

Lawn Ave., Hanna St. 

Washington Court, Cherry St. 

Avalone Avenue area 

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Dan Sione each had lwi> as- 
sists and Bill Barron, Pirelli. 
Mall .larmis, Ryan, O'Brien, 
Dan Hughes and Paul 
Princiollo had one each. 

Tim Sheehan had an out- 
slanding game in goal. 

Quincy defeated Dorch- 
ler. 5-1, in a scrimmage, led 
b\ Scoll Cooper's hat trick. 
Pirelli and Princiollo had the 
other goals, Barron had two 
assists and Bracken, Sullivan 
and Pirelli one each. Rvan 
and Manning had outstand- 
ing games as penalty killers 
and Bruce Stenberg. O'Brien 
and Sheehan all had e.vcelleni 
games. 



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Thursday, January 2S, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Hockey 

North Knocks Brookline 
Out Of First Place 



The North Quincy hockey 
team rebounded from its 
toughest loss of the season to 
tie Brookhne, 3-3, knocking 
Brookhne out of first place in 
the Suburban League, last 
Saturday and making its 
record 5-4-2. 

Dave Peters' Raiders faced 
first-place Brockton last night 
(Wednesday), will host 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
Saturday at 7:50 at the Youth 
Arena and will meet Quincy 
for the second time next 
Wednesday at 5:30 at the 
Youth Arena. 

"This was a big game for us, 
tying Brookline after a very 
hard-to-take loss to 
Waltham," said Peters. 



"Brookline was in first place 
and the boys played an 
excellent game. Our two 
games against Brookline and 
Waltham were our two best of 
the year and I think we do well 
over the second half of the 
season." 

Sal Manganaro, one of the 
highest scorers in the state, 
scored all three North Quincy 
goals, tying the game with his 
third with 2:24 left in the 
game. Manganaro has 21 
goals and nine assists. 

Joe Fasano, another high 
scorer, had two assists and 
Armando Mancini one. 
Fasano has 15 goals and II 
assists 



"Pat O'Donoghue played a 
fine game in goal and all four 
defensemen, Jim McCarthy, 
Matt Swierk, Mancini and 
Duane Keegan, played strong 
games," Peters said. "The 
shots were even, 21 apiece, 
and we played them evenly 
throughout the game." 

Earlier in the week North 
had a 3-2 lead over Waltham 
with 68 seconds left, but 
Waltham came back with two 
goals to defeat the Raiders, 4- 
3. 

"We should have had seven 
or eight goals but their goalie 
(Brian Bolio) was superb and 
stole the game from us," 
Peters said. "We outshot 



them, 44-14, but we just 
couldn't beat him. This was a 
really frustrating loss and it 
was good to see the boys come 
back like they did against 
Brookline." 

Fasano had two goals and 
Swierk one. Mancini, Brian 
Zimmerman, Jamie Tapper 
and Chris McCallum had 
assists. Mancini played an 
outstanding two-way game. 

Waltham scored the tying 
and winning goals 19 seconds 
apart as Wayne Duplessis 
scored his second goal and 
Jason Cormier scored the 
game-winner with 49 seconds 
left in the game. 

~ TOM SULLIVAN 




NORTH QUINCY football players receivMl trophies at the 
recent Queen's Dance. Front, from left, Dan Gilmartin, Mr. 
DOffense; Keith Gott, Mr. Versatility, and Scott Kemp, Mr. 
Defense. Back, Kevin MacDougall, Mr. Special Team; Chris 
Deshler, Mr. Special Team; Alex Malasi, Mr. Lineman, and 
Scott Leonard, Mr. North Quincy. 

(Pholo h\ Pete loim) 



Quincy Bows To Brookline 



McCarthy Nominated 
For Hockey Award 



Quincy's young hockey 
team continues to find the 
going rough and last week lost 
to Brookline, in first place in 
the Suburban League at the 
time, 6-2, dropping its record 



to 0-7-3. 

The Presidents played at 
Waltham last night (Wednesday), 
will host Newton North 
Friday at 4:20 at the Youth 
Arena a^H will face North 



Quincy next Wednesday at 
5:30 at the Youth Arena. 

Scott MacGregor scored 
both Quincy goals in the third 
period against Brookhne, and 



Steve Mclnnis, Jim Schatzl 
and Mark Gilmore had 
assists. 

Brookline was led by Eric 
Choi with a goal and two 
assists. 



Youth Teams Win 5 Of 6 Games 



The South Shore Youth 
Basketball League for boys in 
grades six, seven and eight, 
has been formed and has 
opened the season, commis- 
sioner Ken lulesza of 
Hingham announced. 

Quincy has three teams in 
the league which includes 
teams from Quincy, Braintree, 
Hingham, Duxbury, Sharon, 
Marshfield and Canton. 

Each team will play 12 
games during January and 
February and conclude with a 
playoff tournament in early 
March. 

Quincy coaches are Bob 
Cochrane, sixth grade; Mike 
Draicchio, seventh grade, and 
Ron Mariano, eighth grade. 

The Presidents Youth 
teams won five of six games in 



the first week of action. The 
sixth and eighth grade teams 
won two games while the 
short-handed seventh graders 
broke even. 

The sixth graders defeated 
Canton, 39-35, overcoming a 
five-point deficit in the last 
quarter. The team combined 
strong defense and an 
outstanding shooting 
performance by Jeff Russell, 
who scored 26 points. Matt 
Beston had seven points and 
Dave Gunther, Todd 
Sullivan, Joe Mariano, Jeff 
Feiner, Kevin Norton and 
Mike Sheffer had fine games. 

Sunday at home on the Vo- 
Tech court, the sixth graders 
walloped Hingham, 44-20. 

Russell had 1 5 points in two 
quarters. Boston had nine 



points, Guniher eight, Sean 
Joyce five, Sullivan four, 
Feiner two and Anthony 
Chella one. Mariano, Sheffer, 
Norton, Joe McCarthy and 
Jim Rendle all played well. 

The seventh graders edged 
Canton, 51-48, in overtime as 
Jason Downey had 20 points, 
Chris White 12 and Keith 
Martinsen 1 1 . Brian 
Littlewood had two big steals 
in the fourth quarter for four 
points, Kevin Nichols and 
Martin Cloonan had two 
points and Jason Beauvais, 
Sam Brown and Billy 
Mitchell played strong 
defense. 

The seventh graders, down 
by only four points at the half, 
ran into foul trouble and lost 
to Hingham, 39-24. Downey 
had sevpn points, Cloonan 



five, Littlewood four and Jim 
Smith, Mitchell, Nichols and 
Martinsen two each. 

The eighth grade team led 
all the way in walloping 
Canton, 69-40. Brian Raftery 
swept the boards at both ends 
and Quincy's team speed was 
too much for Canton. Joe 
Kelly, Brian McPartlin, 
Harold Mortel, Jason 
Fennessy and Raftery all 
scored in double figures and 
Jim Cipriano, Mike Bartlett, 
George Wirtz and Mike Kane 
all scored. 

Quincy defeated Hingham, 
34-27, as McPartlin scored 20 
points, Raftery had 18 
rebounds and Mike Kane, 
Mortel, Bartlett, Fennessy 
and Kelly played strong 
defense. 



North Quincy hockey coach 
Dave Peters has nom- 
inated senior defenseman 
Jim McCarthy for the John 
Carlton award, given 
annually in memory of the 
late Boston Bruins scout 
to the outstanding scholar 
and hockey player. 

McCarthy is an A student 
and in the top five of his 
class. He is a member of 
the National Honor Society, 
the Pride Committee, SADD 
(Students Against Drunk 
Driving), the Calculus team 
and the Spanish Club. 
He has received the Schol- 
astic Achievemenl Award 
from the Boston Globe 
three times and is captain 
nf the "'^If team. 

He has applied to Boston 
College, Boston University, 
Holv Cross and North- 



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eastern among other col- 
leges and universities. 

"Jim is an excellent 
scholar and an outstanding 
hockey player," Peters said. 
"He is an excellent pen- 
ahy killer and is a stand- 
out on power plays. He 
plays 25 or more minutes 
of every game. I feel he 
would be a very worthy 
choice for the Carlton 
Award. 

.- TOM SULLIVAN 



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Kraunelis Shines At Emmanuel 



Christine Kraunelis of C 
Quincy, who played her high 
school ball al Notre Dame 
Academy, is enjoNinj: a fine 
season for I he Hmmanuel 

Mile As Lose 

Qumcy's Mile A hockey 
team lost to West wood. ()-5,at 
the Skating Club of Boston. 

Michael Ryan had a 
laniastic game, scoring all live 
goals. John Bertucci had three 
assists. 

I he team played without 
Derek McTomney, out with 
an injury, and Matt Lewis, 
who was ill. 



ollege basektball team. 
Kraunelis. a freshman. 



aseraging 6.9 points and 7..1 
rebounds a game. 



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773-4956 



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Sports 
Stumpers 



GOLF QUIZ 

1. What is the term for a hole played in one stroke tinder 



par? 

2. What is the term for a hole played in one stroke over 
par? 

3. What is the term for a shot that moves slightly from 
the left to right through the air? 

4. What is the term for a golf course laid out on land 
behind coastal beaches? 

5. What is the term for a hazardous area of ground, 
usually hollowed and filled with sand? 

6. What is the term for a hole in one? 

7. What is the term for a contest between players or 
teams which is determined by holes won or lost? 

8. What is the term for areas bordering the fairway that 
are natural and not groomed? 

9. What is the term for completely missing the ball? 

10. What is the term of a cry of warning to other players* 
or spectators in danger of being hit by a ball? 



Soorts Quiz Answers 



1. Birdie; 2. Bogey; 3. Fade; 4. Golf links; 5. Bunlcer; 6. 
Ace; 7. Matchplay; 8. Rough; 9. Whiffing; 10. Fore! 
© 1990 by King Features Synd. 

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233 



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\ 



Pifc 20 Quincy Sun Thuraday, January 2S, 1990 



•« 



Arts/Entertainment 




STORYTELLER GEORGE CAPACCIO entertains Lincoln-Hancock school children with 
stories from the Italian Heritage. The event was the first of five sponsored by the Southwest 
Community Relations Committee and Quincy Neighborhood Housing. The program will 
feature storytellers from different ethnic backgrounds and is supported in part by the 
Massachusetts Arts Lottery as administered by the Quincy Arts Lottery Council. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Multi-Cultural Storytelling 
Sessions At Lincoln Hancock 



The South West Com- 
munity Relations Committee, 
with the assistance of Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing, is 
sponsoring a series of multi- 
cultural storytelling sessions. 

The program will feature 
storytellers from different 



cultural backgrounds sharing 
stories, music and mime with 

children from the Lincoln 
Hancock School in after- 
school sessions beginning at 
2:30 in the school cafeteria. 

The program will feature: 



Surb^'a 



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HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 




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68A Bllllngt Rd. 
N. Quincy, MA 

472-8558 




IRISH 

FOLK 

MUSICIAN 

328-0645 

Al - After 6 p.m. 







DINING 
GUIDE 




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Cantonese and Szechuan Cuisine 
Orders To Go - Cocktails 

105 Sea Street, Quincy 
471-2255 




Mon, Tues., Wed..: Dinners $4,99- Every Mon. Nite: C/W Night - Every 
wed. D.J. - Every Thurs: Java Jive - Every Fri: Oldies & Top 40's - Every 
Sat. Irish Music - Every Sun: Sunday Brunch 9-3 p m Kids $2.99 Adults 
$6.49 - Function Room Available for up to 175 people. 

15 COTTAGE AVE. QUINCY (NEXT TO HANLONS) 



PILGRIM 
RESTAURANT 



"Quincy's Family Restaurant" 



1472 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY 



Call Pilgrim II Go 

For Take Out 

773-5356 



^^i^^ J-^r Q"'"cy P*''" **■"' "" 585 Hancocl< St., Quincy. Serving ail fresh 
^ J^^l^^ foods. Lunch and dinner at very affordable prices. Open 

Monday-Sat 11 :30-1 1:00 and Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. 479-8655 
restaurant /bar 



MIKE KELLY of Waltham and Tommie Stevens of Braintree will appear in the adult comedy 
theaters," at the Quincy Center Dinner Theater beginning Jan. 27. 

^Cheaters' Opens Jan. 27 
At Quincy Dinner Theater 



West of the Moon, 
Appalachian, Native American 
on Jan. 25, Doug Lipman, 
Jewish stories, Feb. 8; 
Chinese Cultural Institute, 
March 1, and Len Cabral, 
Afro-American and Cape 
Verdean, March 22. 



Quincy Center Dinner 
Theatre will present the adult 
comedy "CHEATERS" at the 
Masonic Temple, 1170 

Hancock St. on Jan. 27, Feb. 
3, 4, 10 and II. Saturday 

shows are $25., and the 
nightly events are scheduled 



as follows: a social hour at 
6:30, dinner at 7: 1 5, and show 
at 9:00. Sunday schedule 
features a social hour at 4:30, 
dinner at 5:30, and the show at 
7. Tickets for the dinner and 
show on Sunday are $22.50. 
Auditions for the spring 
musical "GREASE" will be 



held Jan. 29-30 at 7 p.m. The 
cast calls for 20 singers and 
dancers of all ages. 

For further information 
regarding the auditions or 
reservations for the Dinner 
Theatre shows, call Darling 
Productions at (617) 843- 
5862. 



Chocolate Industry 
Historical Society Topic 



The Quincy Historical 
Society will meet Jan. 25 at 

7:30 p.m. at the Adams 

Academy Building, 8 Adams 
St., Quincy. 



Dorchester's chocolate 

industry will be the topic ol 
Anthony Sammarco, of the 

Dorchester Historical 
Society. 



This program is offered free 
to the public. Refreshments 
will be served. 

For more information 
contact Elliott W. Hoffman at 
773-1144. 



Piano Recital At ENC Jan. 28 



Eastern Nazarene College 
Professor Brady Millican will 

perform a piano concert at 4 
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 28, in 

ENC's Cove Fine Arts Center 
Auditorium, 23 East Elm 

Ave., Wollaston. It is the first 
concert in ENC's 1990 Artist 

Series. 



A music history, piano, and 
art history professor at ENC 
since 1979, Millican has 

performed at the White 
House, with members of the 

Cleveland String Quartet, and 
in the Prelude Series of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
During the Jan. 28 Artist 





coknAZ 

Super Sunday Special 
2 Large Cheese Pizzas 

^^8.95 

Don't forget our Party Platters 
We Also Deliver 

61 Franklin St. 

Quincy 

770-1086 



ll!ister5UB 

64 Billings Road, No. Quincy 
328-9764 - FAX 786-9792 

— PASTA — 

Linguini 3.95 

Linguini & li/leatball 4.95 

Linguini & Sausage 4.95 

Linguini 

& Chicken Parmigiana . . . 5.95 

Ziti may b« tubstltuled for linguini 

ALL OF ABOVE SERVED WITH 

DINNER ROLL, BUTTER, GRATED CHEESE 



Series Concert, he will play 
piano solos from Bach, 
Mozart, and Schubert. 

Admission to the concert is 
$5 for the general public, and 

free for all ENC students and 
faculty. All proceeds go to 
ENC music scholarships. For 

directions and other 
information, call (617) 773- 
6350. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 

1/26-2/1 



BORN ON 
THE 4th - R 

^11:25 - 2:00 - 4:35 • 7:10 - 9:48^ 

TANGO & CASH -R 

12- 2:15- 4:35- 7:15- 9:30 



WAR OF THE 
ROSES - R 

1 1 :45 - 2:08 - 4:35 - 7:00 • 9:3 5 

INTERNAL 
AFFAIRS - R 

11:35-2:05-4:40- 7:00-9:38 



SKI PATROL - PG 

12:0S - 2:10 - 4:45 - 7:15 • 9:30 



THE WIZARD - PG 

12:00 - 2:10 



STEEL 
MAGNOLIAS - PG 

4:35 - 7:00 - 9t30 

MUSIC BOX -PG-13 

11:25-2:00-4:35-7:00-9:35 

J^JJJ^ShOjj^nSjL 

ADVANCE SHOWING' ^ 
Dk-nnlt Hoppti 
KMcr Sutherland 

FLASHBACK - R 

Sal., 7 p.m. 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.50 

773-5700 



Tliursday, January 25, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 21 



Quincy Cable TV 



Century 21-Easter Seal 
Volleyball At NQHS 



<.li. : 






Hit luc«l program schedule for 
Quincy Cablesystems Ch. 3 from 
Wednesday, Jan. 24 to Kriday, 
Kebruary 2. 

Wednesday, Jan. 24 
5 57 pm Khvincs ol I Ik I ihka 
"I Ik- llirill ui Ski D.iui, ,i Mill ■ 
(i pm I ).iii I c\ii 
7 pm yuiiKV Spmis Silih.- 
S pm Scnioi Sin. Ills 

Ihursda). Jan. 25 
s <;"' pm Klu UK'S ol I Ik- I inu's 



■■Mi)« ii, Sl,i\ I 11 t (.1 I ik-" 

'' pm I HA 

(y.M) pin (;i( M.it;.i/HK- 

"' pm \1cilu.il Wiiuli - 

( hok'sic'iil 

1 M) pm I HA 

lrida>, Jan. 26 
\() I'KOCiK \\1\i|\(, 

Sunday, Jan. 28: 

5 pm Chinese Programming 
Monday, Jan. 29: 

5:57 Rhymes ol the limes. "Are 
you trying to lake oH weight'" 




Nine of our states got their names from the rivers that flow 
through them — Minnesota, Colorado, Connecticut, llli 
nois, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohin Oregon and Wisconsin. 



This Week's 
Coupon Special 



OVEN-READY 



Save $1.00 



ea. 



Shrimp Casseroles 4.95 
Haddock f^-^'"** 4.99Lb. 

Specials Good thru 1/31/90 
Valid Only with this Coupon 

BURKE'S SEAFOOD 

479-1540 



^ 



61 Billings Road 
No. Quincy, MA 

Prices Subieci to Change 

Sorry — No Substitutions 






Quincy's 

Northeast Fish 
and Lobster 

Live Lobser & Shellfish 

Fresh Fish Daily 
Fried Seafoods To Go 

Lobster and Seafood Salad Rolls 
Phone Orders WELCOME 

472-1230 

148 Granite St., Quincy 

(Next to Fruit Basket) 

Mastercard and Visa Accepted 
(Formerly J.G. Quincy Lobster) 




MIGNOSA'S 
FRUIT BASKET 


GREEN 

Cabbage 

290 Lb 


CALIFORNIA 

Cauliflower 

99 V head 


ANDY BOY 

Broccoli 
Rabe 

990 Lt> 


MIX N' MATCH 

Apples 

R*d Ocllclout 
Gokian 

?il 790 Lb. 


LAND O'LAKES 

American 
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SHce'2.49 Lb. 


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*1.99Lb 


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Onions 

290 L. 


Mushrooms 
»1.29Lb 


148 Granite Street v— «c> 
471-971- 



TueMlay, Jan. 30: 

5:57 pm Rhymes ol the limes, 
"What would you do with a 
millionT" 

6 pm l.ihrary hook Nook 
6:.W pm IBA 

7 pm Coastal Concerns 

H pm lalk About the Mind 
Wednesday, Jan. 31: 
5:57 pm Rhymes of the limes, 
"People gelling rich." 
^ pm Big Wheels 
7 pm Sports I ic. 
H pm Senior Spotlight 



Only On HBO 

THE HBO OMGttlAL MGVK/JANUARY 



The annual Century 
21/ Easter Seal Volleyball 
Games will be held March IT- 
IS and March 25 at North 
Quincy High School. 

The games support Easter 
Seal services for men, women 
and children with disabilities. 

Any group can organize a 
team to plav Comr>p»'«>'i" is 



at every level from novice to 
expert. Every team wins a 
trophy. Every player has the 
satisfaction of helping to fund 
Easter Seal services. 

Prizes include T-shirts, 
athletic bags. Converse 
athletic shoes. Red Sox 
tickets, gift certificates and a 





vacation trip through 
Uniglobe Travel. 

For help in forming a team 
or registration for the 1990 
Century 2I/Easter Seal 
Volleyball Games, call 1-800- 
922-8290 or Nancy/Jane at 
the Easter Seal office, (617) 
482-3370. 



A Disney Channel 

WorlJ Premiere 

Film from the 

creator of the 

award-winning 

miniseries, 

"Anne of 

Green Gables.' 



JANUARY 27th 
9:30 p.m.! 

Call 471-9143 



LANTERN HILL 

Sam Woterston, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mairon Bennett 
as "Jane" star in this drama about a girl's struggle to 

reunite her parents. 

SATURDAY JANUARY 27 7PM 



©Disnr 



^ The ^isf^g^ Channel Continental 

Americas Family Network . Cablevision 



ThoieAre 
a406CoIle 



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(^%^ 6S4 on dble TV previews eveiy^ 
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3:00pm Thursdays (ET) Thursdays (ET) 

For information on the colege of yoiv choice, cal 1 -800-344-2872. 



.MM 



P«|e 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1990 

Charles J. Belcher, Sr., 82 



A funeral Mass for Charles 
J. Belcher. Sr.. 82, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 20 at 
Sacred Heart Church. North 
Ouincy. Burial was in Forest 
Hills Cemetery. Boston. 

Mr. Belcher, former owner 
of the Albany Cafe in 
Roxbury and retired bellhop 
at the Statler Hotel in Boston, 
died at home Jan. 17 after a 
long illness. 

Mr. Belcher worked at the 
Statler Hotel in the I940's and 
50's and owned the cafe from 
1956 to 1965. He was a 
carpenter and woodworker 
for the Bradford Hotel. 

He helped form the hotel 
workers union and was a 
member of the local 4 AFL- 
ClO. 



During his youth he was ■: 
welterweight boxer. Ms 
Belcher was born '. 
Mannheim, Germany, anu 
came to the United States 
when he was one year old. He 
lived in New York and in 
Dorchester from 1939 to 1975 
when he moved to Quincy. 

The husband of the late 
Fleanor McKen/ie, he is 
survived by a son, Charles J. 
Belcher Jr. of Maine; two 
daughters. Sue A. Sullivan of 
Squantum and Annette 
"Cookie" Murray of 
Abington; a brother, Robert 
Weiss of New York, eight 
grandchildren and two great- 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 



Annie Lundgren, 92 



A funeral service for Annie 
Lundgren, 92, of Quincy, was 
held Jan. 17 at Covenant 
Congregational Church. 
Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Miss Lundgren died at 
home Jan. 13 after a brief 
illness. 

Miss Lundgren, a retired 
private secretary for Field and 
Cowles Insurance Co. of 
Boston, was a member of 
Covenant Congregational 
Church where she taught 
Sunday School for 50 vears. 

Antoinette 

A memorial service for 
Antoinette (DeCarlo) Grada, 
82, of Quincy was held Jan. 20 
at the Doherty-Gately and 
Loker Funeral Home, 4 
Lincoln St., off Route 135, 
Natick. Mrs. Grada, a packer 
for the Araban Coffee Co., 
South Boston, died Jan. 14 at 
Newton-Wellesley Hospital 
after a brief illness. 

She had retired in 1972. 
Mrs. Grada was born in 
Naugatuck, Conn., and lived 
in Boston he^^^rp moving to 



She was a member of the 
Naomi Society at the church. 

Miss Lundgren is survived 
by two brothers, Bendix A. 
Lundgren of Quincy and Carl 
G. Lundgren of Dennisport; a 
sister, Mildred H. Tingey of 
Quincy, and eight nephews 
and nieces. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens & 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made to 
the memorial fund of the 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. 

Grada, 82 

Quincy 30 years ago. 

Wife of the late William 
Grada, she is survived by a 
daughter, Eileen S. Gillespie 
of Wellesley; two sisters, 
Delia Charos of Newbury and 
Marguerite Lovine of 
Connecticut, four grand- 
children and six great- 
grandchildren. 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society, 
186 Main St., Marlborough, 

01752. 



THAMYOV 
FOR YOUR 




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Obituaries 

Greenough Abbe, 89 

Was A Ski Pioneer 



A memorial service for 
Greenough Abbe, 89, of 
Squantum, was held Jan. 17 
in the First Church of 
Squantum. Burial was 
private. 

Mr. Abbe died Jan. 14 at 
Carney Hospital, Dorchester. 

He was a life member of the 
Appalachian Mountain Club 
and a ski pioneer in the early 
1920's who opened up ski 
trails and led ski trips. 

He was a sales draftsman 
with the former Filing 
Equipment Bureau Co. 

A native of Newton, he 
received his degree in 
csoriolnov from Dartmouth 



University in 1924. He lived in 
Squantum for 55 years. 

He and his wife, Dorothy 
(Adams) Abbe celebrated 
their 55th anniversary last 
October. 

He is survived also by a son, 
Fred Adams Abbe of 
Squantum; a daughter, Susan 
Yates of Mercer Island, 
Wash.; a daughter-in-law 
Susan Abbe of Squantum and 
four grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Deware Funeral Home, 
576 Washington St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made to 
charity. 



Edward J. Downey, Jr., 69 

Past President Si. Ann's HNS 



A funeral Mass for Edward 
J. Downey Jr., 69, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 16 at St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 
Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Mr. Downey died Jan. 11 at 
the Massachusetts Respiratory 
Hospital, Braintree, after a 
long illness. 

A former safety director for 
Cumberland Farms, he 
retired in 1985. He was a 
member of the American 
Society of Safety Engineers 
and attended the Fore River 
Apprentice School in Quincy. 

Mr. Downey was a Navy 
veteran of World War H. 

He was a past president of 
St. Ann's Church's Holy 
Name Society. 

Mr. Downey attended 
Boston University. 



Born in Cleveland, Ohio, 
Mr. Downey lived in Quincy 
for many years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Helen P. (Hourihan) 
Downey, two sons, Edward J. 
Downey III of New 
Hampshire and John B. 
Downey of Quincy; three 
daughters, Susan P. Downey 
of Dorchester, Rosemary J. 
Downey of Quincy and 
Kathleen D. Ingley of 
Maryland; and a grandchild, 
Erin K. Downey. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Friends of Mass. 
Respiratory Hospital 
(M.R.H.), 2001 Washington 
St., Braintree, MA 02184. 




A THOyGHT FOR THE WEEK 

Ever ask yourself the question, 
"Am I really as happy as I can t>e 
and am I giving the t>est I can In 
this life?" Perhaps there really 
Isn't any clear-cut answer to this 
question ... Yet perhaps there Is ... 
nv c .. r.., .„ ^ Through the years, we all have 
D Scott Deware „,^, J.ukes We all have had 
certain habits, moods, fears and feelings of guilt which 
have kept us restless and unhappy at certain times. Yet 
it is possible to turn from the Inadequate and unhappy 
things of life and begin living a new life. This can be 
done by deciding we are through with unhappiness ... 
we are going to cast unhappiness behind us ... 

True ... there is some unhappiness that can never be 
cast aside, but most of it can ... True ... we need 
constantly to remind oursleves that we can be about 
as happy as we make up our minds to be ... True ... 
drcumsUnces play a part In our lives ... but isn't It also 
true that WILLPOWER md FAITH also play an 
important pari? ... True ... It Is never too late to change. 
This has become a truth so often repeated t*iat It is a 
Iniiain. 

CouMnI H be said that happiness can be ours when 
we an supported by tMt hope and confidence? 

Deware Funerai Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

Tel: 472-1137 

Member c, the "New Enyiand Funerai Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist. 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Margaret A. Falconer, 89 

Relired Bookkeeper 

funeral service for many nieces and nephews. 



A lunerai service 
Margaret Ann Falconer. 89. 
of Quincy and Marshfield. a 
retired bookkeeper for Minot 
DeBlois and Madison inc.. 
was held Monday at Christ 
Episcopal Church, Quincy. 

Miss Falconer died Jan. 18 
at the Mayflower House in 
Plymouth. 

She was born in Boston. 

She was a member of the 
Christian Endeavor. 

Daughter of the late 
Charles B. and Mary A. 
(Lindsay) Falconer, she is 
survived by a sister, Mary A. 
Bilker of Marshfield; and 



grandnieces and grand- 
nephews. 

She was the sister of the late 
William Falconer, Warren 
Falconer, Edward Falconer, 
Edith Falconer, Charles 
Falconer and Cecilia Mackay. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Hamel, Wickens & 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made to 
the Children^ Hospital, .WO 
l.ongwood Ave., Boston. 



Cecilia M. O'Connor, 74 



A funeral Mass for Cecelia 
M. (St. Laurent) O'Connor, 
74, a Quincy resident for 58 
years, was celebrated Jan. 22 
at St. John's Church. Burial 
was in Blue Hill Cemetery, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. O'Connor died Jan. 
17 at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

Mrs. O'Connor was born in 
Quebec and lived in 
Somerville before moving to 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late William F. 
O'Connor, she is survived bv a 



son. Robert J. O'Connor of 
Middleboro; a daughter, 
Sally A. This-sell of Dedham; 
a sister, Martha lozzo of 
Medway, and three grand- 
children. She was the mother 
of the late William J. 
O'Connor, sister of the late 
Jean Rogers, and grand- 
mother of the late Todd 
Thissell. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, I 
Independence Ave. 



Katherine M. Gill, 89 



A funeral Mass for 
Katherine M. "Kitty" Gill. 89, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 15 at St. Boniface 
Church by Miss Gill's cousin, 
the Rev, John C. O'Sullivan 
of Seattle, Wash., and her 
nephew, the Rev, Aidan J. 
Walsh of Milton. Burial was 
in Mount Benedict Cemetery, 
West Roxbury. 

Miss Gill died Jan. 12 at 
Milton Hospital after a long 
illness. A former member of 
the Third Order of St. 
Francis, she was a communi- 
cant of St. Boniface Church in 
Oiiin,M' nnri assisted in the Lav 



Apostolate for St. Boniface 
by coordinating the weekly 
celebration of the Eucharist in 
the senior citizen's complex of 
the church. 

She was born in Kenmare, 
County Kerry, Ireland, and 
lived in Quincy for 20 years. 

She is survived by two 
sisters. Elizabeth Walsh of 
Milton and Nora (Gill) 
Hurley of Killarney, County 
Kerry, Ireland, and many 
nieces and nephews. She was 
the sister of the late Mae 
Wilkinson, John Joe Gill, 
Thomas Gill and Daniel Gill. 



Francis C. Skidmore, 75 



A funeral Mass for Francis 
C. Skidmore, 75, of Quincy, 
was celebraced Jan. 18 in St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 
Burial was in Mount Hope 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Mr. Skidmore, a machine 
operator for American 
Biltrite Inc. in Boston for 44 
years, died Jan. 13 at Quincy 
Hospital after a brief illness. 

He retired in 1972. 

Mr. Skidmore was a 
member of the Quincy Deaf 
Club, Brookline Senior 
Citizens Deaf Club, St. 
Francis DeSales Church Holy 
Name Society for the Deaf 
and other local clubs for the 
deaf. 



He was born in Boston. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mary C. (Veglairado) 
Skidmore: two sons, Thomas 
F, Skidmore and Glen 
Skidmore. both of Boston; 
two stepdaughters, Theresa 
Anthony of Scituate and Joan 
Baker of Marshfield; two 
brothers, John Skidmore and 
Paul Skidmore; a sister, 
Sylvia Chism; 10 grand- 
children and eight great- 
grandchildren. He was the 
brother of the late Charles 
Skidmore. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 333 Hancock St. 



Margaret Maibach, 91 



ir-^ I I I ' ' I 



A funeral Mass for 
Margaret (Higgins) Maibach, 
91, of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 8 at Sacred Heart 
Church. Burial was in 
Brookdale Cemetery, 
Dedham. 

Mrs. Maibach, a parishion- 
er of Sacred Heart Church, 
died Jan. 13 at Quincy 
Hospital. 



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Mrs. Maibach was a 
member of the Third Order of 
St. Francis. 

She was born in Hingham 
and lived 60 years in Quincy. 

Wife of the late Edwin C. 
Maibach, she is survived by a 
son, Lawrence E. Maibach of 
Quincy; a sister, Katherine 
Howard of Roslindale; three 
grandchildren, and two great- 
grandchildren. She was the 
sister of the late Mary 
Higgins, Augustine Higgins, 
William Higgins, John 
Higgins, Andrew Higgins, 
James Higgins, and Thomas 
Higgins. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



HALSTON • AVANT GARDE • OSU AH UtLA RENT A e YVES SAINT LAURENT • TUHA 



H 




J. William LeClair, 62 

Past Wollaslon Post Commander 



A funeral Mass for J. 
William LeClair, 62, of 
Quincy. a salesman for the 
Union Gear and Sprocket 
Corp. of Quincy for eight 
years and past commander of 
the Wollaston American 
Legion Post, was celebrated 
Wednesday at St. Joseph's 
Church, Quincy Point. 

Mr. LeClair died Jan 20 at 
Brockton Hospital after a 
sudden illness. 

He was former president of 
the Holy Name Societies at 
St. John's Church and St. 
Joseph's Church and a 
member of the St. Vincent de 
Paul Society. 

Before joining the Quincy 
firm, he was a salesman for 
the Warren and Pike Co. of 
Watertown for many years 
and the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Co. As a young 
man, he was an electrician for 
the New York New Haven 



and Hartford Railroad. 

Mr. LeClair was a World 
War II Navy veteran, serving 
in the Pacific Theater. 

Husband of the late Rita D. 
(Fitzgerald) LeClair, he is 
survived by a son. Stephen T. 
LeClair of Bridgewater; a 
daughter, Laurie A. LeClair 
of Woburn; a daughter-in- 
law, Barbara A. (Pugliesi) 
LeClair; and three grand- 
children, Renee M. LeClair, 
Jacqueline M. LeClair and 
Michael J. LeClair, all of 
Bridgewater. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 
Independence Ave., Quincy. 

Donations may be made to 
the Greater Randolph 
Occupational Workshop, 10 
Pauline ,St., Randolph, MA 
02368. 



Alan L. Erickson, 42 

Carpet Installer 



A funeral service for Alan 
L. Erickson, 42, of Quincy, a 
carpet installer for 10 years, 
was conducted Tuesday in the 
Sweeney Brothers Home for 
Funerals, I Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 

Mr. Erickson died at home 
Jan. 19 after a brief illness. 

Born in Quincy, he lived in 
Weymouth for a short time 
before returning to Quincy. 

He attended school in 
Quincy and Weymouth. 

He is survived by his 
mother and stepfather, Alice 



P. (Rinaldi) and Thomas R. 
Farquhar of Quincy; his 
grandmother, Louise M. 
(Asciloa) Rinaldi of Quincy; 
and several aunts, uncles and 
cousins. He was the son of the 
late Albert C. Erickson and 
grandson of the late Mario 
Rinaldi, and Carl and Helga 
(Winnquist) Erickson. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Donations may be made to 
Father Bill's Place, 38 Broad 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Nicole N. Baszkiewicz 



A Mass of the Angels for 
Nicole N. Baskiewicz of 
Quincy, infant daughter of 
Paul and Patricia (Palma) 
Baszkiewicz, was celebrated 
Jan. 19 at Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Church, Merrymount. 
Burial was in Woodlawn 
Cemetery, Everett. She died 
Jan. 17. 

She is also survived by two 
sisters, Jennifer Baskiewicz 
and Stacey Baszkiewicz, both 
of Quincy; her grandparents, 
Nancy (Masciulli) Baszkiewicz 

Thomas H. 
McCourt, 26 

A funeral Mass for Thomas 
H. McCourt, 26, of Quincy, 
an employee at the John 
Corcoran Management Co., 
was celebrated Wednesday in 
St. Joseph's Church, 
Needham. 

Mr. McCourt died Sunday 
at South Shore Hospital. 
Weymouth, where he had 
been a patient since being 
injured in an auto accident 
Jan. 7 in Marshfield. 

He was a former employee 
of the Thomas J. Flatley Real 
Estate Co. 

Born in Boston, he lived in 
Quincy four months. 

He graduated from 
Needham High in 1981 and 
the University of New 
Hampshire in 1985. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Sandra (Kelly) McCourt; his 
parents. Dr. Thomas H. 
McCourt and Jane P. (Lynch) 
McCourt of Needham; two 
brothers, Scott A. McCourt 
and William J. McCourt, 
both of Needham; a sister, 
Joanne E. McCourt of 
Needham; his grandmother, 
Edna F. McCourt of 
Brookline, and several aunts, 
uncles and cousins. 

Burial was in Evergreen 
Cemetery, Brighton. 

Funeral arrangements were 
hy the George F. Doherty 
Funeral Home. Needham. 



of South Boston, Suzanne 
(Muse) Palma of East Boston 
and Albert Palma of Orlando, 
Fla., and her aunts and 
uncles, Robert and Janice 
Baszkiewicz of Quincy, 
Edward and Joanne Baszkiewicz 
of South Boston, and Debbie 
White, Michael and Helen 
Gaeta and Gloria Palma, all 
of East Boston. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



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Philip J. Doherty, 61 

GTE Engineer 



A funeral Mass for Philip J. 
Doherty, 61, of Quincy, an 
engineer for GTE in Needham 
for 31 years, was celebrated 
Wednesday at .St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mr. Doherty died Jan. 20 at 
St. Luke's Hospital, 
Middleboro, after being 
stricken ill while playing golf 
in Lakeville. 

Born in Boston, he lived in 
Charlestown before moving 
to Quincy 30 years ago. 

He was a Marine Corps 
veteran of World War II. 

U" ie ciirvived bv his wife. 



Eleanor ((iregory) Doherty; 
two daughters, Phyllis 
Doherty Trubiano of Milton 
and Linda Doherty Lee of 
Cheyenne, Wyoming; a sister, 
Hanna DeRosa of Charlestown; 
and five grandchildren. He 
was the brother of the late 
John Doherty, Joseph Helen 
Foley and Grace Callahan. 

Burial was in Milton 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston, 



Patricia M. Woodford, 58 

Secretary 



A funeral Mass for Patricia 
M. (Walker) Woodford, 58, 
of Quincy, a secretary for 
Sullivan and McLaughlin 
Electric Co., Dorchester, will 
be celebrated today (Thursday) 
at 10 a.m. in St. Joseph's 
Church, Quincy Point. 

Mrs. Woodford died 
Sunday at home. 

She was a member of the 
Ladies Sodality of St. 
Joseph's Church. 

Born in Boston, she lived in 
Dorchester until moving to 
Quincy 10 years ago. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Patrick J. Woodford; 
three sons, Mark J . 
Woodford of Braintree, and 
Richard P. Woodford and 
"— »4 Woodford, both of 



Dorchester; two daughters, 
Julie M. Fitzgerald of New 
Hampshire and Laurie E. 
Woodford of Quincy; four 
brothers, William Walker of 
Lowell, Richard Walker of 
Marshfield, Robert Walker of 
Quincy and James Walker of 
Florida; a sister, Marian 
Penny of Quincy and five 
grandchildren. 

Burial will be in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 
p.m. Wednesday at the 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy Center. 

Donations may be made to 
St. Coletta's Day School, 
Braintree. 



Mary A. Flaherty 



A funeral Mass for Mary A. 
(O'FIaherty) Flaherty of 
Quincy was celebrated 
Wednesday at the Star of the 
Sea Church, Squantum. 

Mrs. Flaherty died Sunday 
at Beth Israel Hospital after a 
long illness. 

A native of Ireland, she 
lived in Quincy many years. 
She was the wife of the late 
Michael J. Flaherty. 

She is survived by a son. 



Walter Flaherty of Quincy; 
two sisters, Barbara Madan of 
Brookline and Sidney Dodd 
of London; and a brother, 
Thomas Flaherty of Galway, 
Ireland. 

Burial was in New Calvary 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Lydon-Russell Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 



Quality 
Printing 

at a 

Reasonable 
Price 



Thursday, January 2S, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 23 

Mary Tierney 

Carney Hospital Volunteer 

A funeral Mass for Mary she lived in Dorchester before 

moving to Quincy 35 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late E. 
Raymond Tierney. she is 
survived by two sons, John R. 
Tierney of Brockton and 
Edward R. Tierney Jr. of 
Easton; a daughter. Patricia 
C. Downing of Holbrook; 
nine grandchildren and 1 1 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements were 
made by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St.. 
Wollaston, 

Donations may be made to 
the American Cancer Society, 
247 Commonwealth Ave., 



(O'Herin) Tierney of Quincy 
a member of the North 
Quincy Women's Club and a 
former volunteer at Carney 
Hospital in Dorchester, was 
celebrated Tuesday in Sacred 
Heart Church. 

Mrs. Tierney died Jan, 19 at 
Quincy Hospital after a long 
illness. 

She was a communicant of 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. where she was a 
member of the Sodality and 
senior citizens group. She was 
a member of the Catholic 
Daughters of America, the 
"K" Club of Dorchester and 
was a former communicant of 
St, Ann's Church, Dorchester. 



Born in Graniteville, Vt.. Boston 

Smoking Cessation Course 
At Quincy Hospital 



Quincy Hospital will once 
again offer its Smoking 
Cessation Program, begin- 
ning with a free, introductory 
session Wednesday, Feb. 7 at 
7:30 p.m. in the hospital 
cafeteria. 

The seven-session program 
incorporates behavior 
modification and relaxation 



techniques. Participants learn 
the "cues" that make them 
want to smoke and how to 
avoid them, find substitutes 
for smoking without anxiety 
or weight gain, and learn how 
to "reprogram" behavior to 
eliminate the need to smoke. 
For registration informa- 
tion, call 773-6100, ext. 2072. 



Red Cross Blood 
Drives In February 



Two American Red Cross 
blood drives have been 
scheduled in Quincy for 
February, open to the public. 

Feb. 26, from I to 7 p.m., 
the drive v. ill take place at 
Oi'incv Point Congregational 



Church, 444 Washington St., 
Quincy. 

Feb. 28, from 9 a.m. to 2 
p.m., the drive will be held at 
Quincy Junior College, 34 
Coddington St., Quincy. 



St. Valentine's Dance 
At Fontbonne 



A Valentine's Dance for 
parents and friends of 
Fontbonne Academy will be 
held Saturday, Feb. 10, a 
change in date. 

Dancing will be from 8 p.m. 
to I a.m. in Fontbonne 
Gymnasium, with music 
provided by D.J. John Sweet. 

Tickets at $10. per person 
may be ordered from Barbara 



Daly, chairwoman, at 
Fontbonne Academy, 930 
Brook Rd., Milton, MA 
02186. Tables of ten will be 
reserved upon request. 
Tickets will be held in the 
purchaser's name and may be 
picked up that evening at the 
door. 

The deadline for reserva- 
tions is Friday, Feb. 2. 




Program Books, Brochures, 

Newspapers, Newsletters, Political 

Flyers, Tickets, Stationery, Resumes 

and Typesetting. 

Is Also Our Specialty. 



#^^ 




' K^l^_ 



1372 HaiK'ock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 






Page 24 Quincy Sun Thuriday, January 25, 1990 




Special Features 



GRUBBY 



By Warren Sattlcr 




IT JUST SO HAPPENED 




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Star scope X 

ary 25 U-4 



WEEK OF: January 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK ^ 

You are intellectually inclined, basing actions on logic more than 
on emotion. You are known for your independent stance and 
creative spirit. January through July are favorable for educa- 
tional expansion. Additional responsibilities are offset by financial 
prudence. Romantic commitment is an ongoing theme. 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - February 19 

Others may start to lean on you; be supportive without being 
a crutch. Moneymaking ideas require added thought, bocial 
life is livelier. Unexpected obligation may anrive. 

PISCES - February 20 - March 20 

Plotting an outline is critical, whether you're writing a story or 
shaping your goals for the coming uear. Good week for send- 
ing reminders about outstanding debts. 

ARIES - March 21 - April 20 

Week sees you cutting your losses and thus able to get on with 
the task at hand. More than ever it's important to hear all sides 
of the story that currently is circulating. 

TAURUS - April 21 - May 22 

Bargain-hunting may prove productive-provided the items you 
seek out arc really suitable. An earthier look seems to suit your 
present attitude. Youngster's outlook is now brightening. 

GEMINI - May 23 - June 21 

Combination of events leads to your landing a plum assign- 
ment. News from around the corner may be more interesting 
than news from around the globe. Good week for launching 
a health program. 

CANCER - June 22 - July 22 „...,.. 

A minor risk may pay off, provided you can afford to take the 
gamble. Week sees you both giving and receiving-and enjoy- 
ing both roles. Opportunity may open for earning spare cash. 

LEO - July 23 - August 22 

You excel this week in a leadership role and take on new and 
interesting responsibilities. If signing on any dotted line, 
however, be sure to read all the fine print. 

VIRGO - August 23 - September 22 ..... 

, Ailing or unhappy friend responds well to your high spirits. 
Travel or travel planning is currently on tap. but be absolutely 
certain about your choice of travel companion. 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

Friend or relative is becoming less possessive and allows you 
breathing space. Indeed, this individual is quite willing to take 
on added responsibilities, so don't hesitate to share or delegate 
tasks. 

SCORPIO - October 23 - November 21 

l-riendship favors a lighthearted approach. On the job front, 
important projects demand a combination of diligence and 
creativity. Family member may be loo willing to help you 
decorate. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 - December 22 
Business and travel may mix well at this time, provided you 
understand your priorities. The steady progress you've been 
making may help land you a plum assignment. Don't neglect 
health and fitness. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 - January 20 

Some changes in work environment may make for a livelier 
than usual week. On a personal level, this is a prime time to 
work out a self-improvement plan. Low-key friend become: 
more expressive. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

January 25th, actor Dean Jones; 26lh, singer Eartha Kitt; ^/th, 
conductor Skitch Henderson; 28th, actor Alan Alda; 29fh, 
actress Katherine Ross; 30th, actress Vanessa Redgrave; 31st, 
actress Suzanne Pleshette. 



ACROSS 
1. Compass 



4. 
12. 
13. 

14. 

16. 
17. 
19. 
23. 
24. 

26. 
27. 
29. 
31. 
32. 
34. 
36. 



point 

A medley 

Cereal gross 

Took Into 

custody 

Within, 

comb, form 

Ship 

Sedote 

Trembling 

Digraph 

Varnish 

ingredient 

Huge 

Meodow 

Swob 

Yarn fluff 

Volcano 

Moke lace 

Indus tribesman 



37. Circles 

39. Norrow Inlet 

4). Note of scale 

42. Frightens 

44. Rich milk 

46. Kind of pKjem 

48. Arrived 

49. Said again 



53. 
54. 
55. 



Sol 
Careless 
Superlative 
ending 

DOWN 
Gropplers 
Artificial 
New Zealand 
locust 

Mole porent 
A sphere 
Horse's gait 
Semi precious 
stone 



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l-i.S-1' Solution 

8. Bony 

9. Guido's note 

10. Note of scale 

1 1 . Corp 

15. Lubricate 
18. Water barrier 

20. Overnice 
person 

21. Stupid person 

22. Domage 
25. Smoll bed 
28. Girl's name 
30. Equal 

33. Concurred 
35. Sposm 
38. Flower port 
40. Section of 

circle 
43. Location 
45. Comfort 
47. French 

pronoun 

49. Blood factor 

50. Engir>eering 
degree 

51. Protestont 
Episcopol (abbr.) 

52. College degree 



Councillors Indicate Sewer 
User Fee Will Be Passed 



iC.oni'd front I'afie I) 

quarter and $2X1.19 lor the- 
\\ 1991. 

Other charges, based on 
actual water bills, would be: 

• Kamily of lise: S6K.09 
last quarter, $307.15 lor year. 

• Jamily of nine: $110.29 
last quarter. $497.49 for year. 

• Iwo elderly people, 
without abatement. $24.45 
last quarter. $1 10..12 lor year. 

• I wo elderly people. v\ ith 
abatement. $18. .^4 last 
quarier; $S2.74 for year. 

• Senior cili/en living 
alone, without abatement. 
SI 4.19 last quarter. $64. K« lor 
year. 

• Senior citi/en. with 
abatement. $10.80 for last 
quarter. $48.66 for year. 



However, the rates will 
likely triple in live years as 
ratepayers shaie the cost of 
cleaning up Boston Harboi. 

I he lee will also apply to 
major industrial users and 
small businesses. 

Reacting to the abatement 

amendment. Sheets said he 
supports such a measure. He 
noted that while drafting his 
fee proposal, he considered 
putting an abatement clause 
in it. In the end. he decided to 
leave it up to the council. 

"We had talked extensively 
about some sort ol provision 
to follow for an abatement 
under some circumstances. 



Patrick Wrinn On Thayer Academy 
Middle School Honor Roll 



Patrick Wrinn, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Wrinn of 

Quincy, has received high 

Pat's Peak 
Ski Trip 
Feb. 11 

Recreation Director Barry 
Welch announces the Quincy 
Recreation Department will 
sponsor a one day ski trip to 
Pats Peak Ski Area in 
Henniker. N.H. 

The trip will be held 
Sunday. Feb. 1 1 and is open 
to all Quincy residents age 10 
through adult. Those under 
10 may attend if accompanied 
by an adult. Family groups 
are encouraged to attend. 

The fee for round trip coach 
bus and all day lift ticket is 
$32. Reduced rates for rental 
equipment and optional 
lessons can also be arranged. 
The trip will be supervised by 
Recreation Department staff. 
Registration will be held in 
the Recreation Office at 100 
Southern Artery beginning 
today (Thursday), weekdays 
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., as 
long as openings exist. 

Pat's Peak Ski Area has 14 
trails and slopes, a triple 
chairiift to the top of the 
mountain, two double 
chairlifts, two T-Bars. and 
one J-Bar. The uphill capacity 
is 6,000 persons per hour. The 
elevation is 1,400 feet, it has a 
main lodge, ski school, ski 
shop, nursery, lunch room, 
and ski patrol. 

Participants are urged to 
register early as previous trips 
have been at capacity and 
enrollment is limited. 
Additional information can 
be obtained by calling 773- 
1380, ext. 204. 

Julie Clifford On 
SMU Dean's List 

Julie A. Clifford, of 
Quincy, a Humanities and 
Social Science Major, has 
heen named to the President s 
list at Southeastern 
Massachusetts University in 
North Dartmouth. 

The President's List 
denotes full-time students 
\^ho have achieved a grade 
point average of 3.8 (out of a 
possible 4.0) or higher. 

Save Gas 
and Money 
Shop Locally. 



honors on Thayer Academy's 
Middle School second term 
honor roil. 

He is a student in the eighth 
grade class. 



We looked at a number ol 
possibilities. In the end, it was 
mv conclusion that I would 
leave that decision up to the 
City Council." Sheets said. 

Continuing, the mayor 
said. "I certainly intend to 
support their amendment. I 
don't want a sewer user lee. 
(Councillors) don't want a 
sewer user fee and the people 
of Quincy don't want a sewer 
user fee. 

"But we're at the point 
where we really don't have a 
choice," referring to the state's 
fiscal mismanagement which 
he said has created a "state of 

chaos" because of drastic cuts 
in local aid. 

"Ihe failure to make the 
necessary cuts on Beacon Hill 
means the fiscal problems are 
deepening and worsening at 
the state level." he said. 

Compounding the problem 
are rising MWRA assess- 
ments and insurance costs. 
I h e assessments alone 
increased $2 million, from 
$4.8 million to $6.8 million. 

Sheets is counting on the 
sewer user fee to help offset a 



$2 million deficit at the end of 
this fiscal year in June. A 
deficit this year will be rolled 
over into next year's budget, 
the mavor noted. 

I he mayor also said that 
the weekend storm had wiped 
out the city's $.300,000 snow 
and ice removal budget and 
put the account in the red bv 
an estimated $IOO.(X)0. 

Additional money spent on 
snow removal will be rolled 
over into next year's budget as 
a deficit, he added. 



LOWEST 



PRICED 



PICTURE 



FRAMING 



Tliunday, January 25, 1990 Quincy Sun Page 25 

Parsons & Richardson 

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC 
'Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later' 

65 Winter Street 

P O BOX 509 

So Weymouth, MA 02190 

(1 Block NORTH ofRi 18 

Expressway Exit) 

Tels # 335-1656 & 1657 



^0 



^^^ 



.<^\ 



•^0 '/"' Srninr I)i\ri}untl /^f 



Buffet All Day 

Familx Restaurant 




(at the Quincy Bay Inn) Monday - Friday, 11 am to 8 pm 
29 Hancock St., North Quincy 



All YOU 

Can Eat! 



«550 Adult 
»35o Child 



KENNEDY 
STUDIOS 



1563 Hancock St 

773-6611 



FREE INSTALLATION 



Coffee or Soda Included 

or for your dining pleasure 

Try Our Pull Service Menu 

Breakfast All Day, Sandwiches, Pizza, 
Light Dinners, Fish & Chips 

• Saturday Brunch 10 am to 3 pm 
Lunch and Dinner Entrees til 8 pm 

• Sunday Brunch 1 am til 3 pm Saturday & Sunday 

• Plenty of free parking Brunch Same Price 




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.$1.00 OFF 
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] on Saturday and 
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Buffet All Day 773-3300 



HOT PROGRAMS HHt 
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THE NAKED GUN: FROM THE 
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fiBO, natumlly. See movies like "Rain Man," ■b^^^" ^^^ ""^'^^ *"* P°y ^' ^^^ co™dies, great 

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not all. There's a new HBO Original Movie /jf^fJl/nj/al/mJIoJ/yl ' ^^^^ sizzle. So get HBO and Cinemax 
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NEWSCARRIERS 
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Here's a chance to 
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Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

Norfolk Division 

No 89D1931D1 
JEAN M. BRONDI 
Plaintiff 
vs. 
Order for Service by Publication 
RICHARD J BRONDI 
Defendant 
Upon motion of plaintiff for 
an order directing Richard J. 
Brondi, the defendant 
herein, to appear, plead or 
answer, in accordance with 
Mass. R. Civ. P./Mass.R. 
Dom.Rel. P. RULE 4, it 
appearing to the Court that 
this is an action-to disolve 
the bonds of matrimony that 
the said Richard J. Brondi 
cannot be found within the 
Commonwealth and that his 
present whereabouts are 
unknown; that personal 
service on said defendant is 
therefore not practicable, 
and that said defendant has 
not voluntarily appeared in 
this actioa it is Ordered that 
said Richard J. Brondi is 
directed to appear, pleadm 
answer or otherwise move 
with respect to the complaint 
herein on or before the 11th 
day of April 1990, or in 
default thereof this Court will 
proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this suit; 

Order that the accompany- 
ing summons be published in 
The Quincy Sun once a week 
for three consecutive weeks 
beginning January 25, 1990; 
and it is further Ordered that 
a copy of the summons be 
mailed to the defendant at his 
last known address by 
registered or certified mail. 
Date: January 10, 1990 
ROBERT M. FORD 
Justlct of Probst* 
and Family Court 
1/25, 2/1. 2/8/90 



Pli(r 26 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 25, I9M 



LEGAL NOTICES 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF 

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

ONE WINTER STREET 

BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 

TEL (617) 292-5673 

Pursuant to Chapter 21, Section 43 of the General Laws, and 
314 CMR 7 and 2 06, notice is given of the following 
applications for sewer extention or connection permits and 
proposed actions thereon: 

City of Rockland 

Project Name New England Art 

Applicant New England Art 

Purpose: Connection for Chemical Waste 

Tracking No: 6325 

Proposed Action: Tentative Determination to Issue: 

The above applications, and applicable laws, regulations and 
procedures are available for inspection at the above address. 
Comments on the proposed actions or requests for a public 
hearing on the proposed actions must be sent to the above 
address within 30 days of this notice. 

Cornelius O'Leary 
Acting Director 



LEGAL NOTICES 



1/25/90 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF 

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

ONE WINTER STREET 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 

TEL (617) 292-5673 

Pursuant to Chapter 21. Section 43 of the General Laws, and 
314 CMR 7. and 2.06, notice is given of the following 
applications for sewer extention or connection permits and 
proposed actions thereon: 

City of: Quincy 

Project Name: Quincy Municpl Landfill 

Applicant: Quincy DPW 

Location: Ricciuti Drive 

Purpose: Connection for Landfill 

Leachate 

Tracking No: 6339 

Proposed Action: Tentative Determination to Issue: 

The above applications, and applicable laws, regulations and 
procedures are available for inspection at the above address 
Comments on the proposed actions or requests for a public 
hearing on the proposed actions must be sent to the above 
address within 30 days of this notice. 

Cornelius O'Leary 
Acting Director 

1/25/90 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO 5 
ORDERED: 



January 16. 1990 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinance for the City of Quincy, 1976, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Section 151. 
General Salary Classification and Wages. 



STRIKE OUT THE FOLLOWING: 








STEP 


STEP 


STEP 


TITLE 


ONE 


TWO 


THREE 


FIRE FIGHTER 


$20,604. 


$21,521. 


$26,111. 


AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING 








STEP 


STEP 


STEP 


TITLE 


ONE 


TWO 


THREE 


Effective 7/1/87 








FIREFIGHTER 


21,222. 


22.167 


26.894. 


Effective 6/30/88 








FIRE FIGHTER 


21,646. 


22,610. 


27,432. 


Effective 1/1/89 








FIRE FIGHTER 


22,945. 


23.966. 


29,078. 


Effective 1/1/90 








FIRE FIGHTER 


24.322. 


25,404. 


30,823 


STRIKE OUT THE FOLLOWING: 






TITLE 


STEP 


STEP 


STEP 




ONE 


TWO 


THREE 


FIRE LIEUTENANT 






$32,117. 


FIRE CAPTAIN 






$39,503 


DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 






$48,588. 


AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING: 







TITLE 

Effective 7/1/87 

FIRE LIEUTENANT 
FIRE CAPTAIN 
DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 

Effective 6/30/88 

FIRE LIEUTENANT 
FIRE CAPTAIN 
DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 

Effective 1/1/89 

FIRE LIEUTENANT 
FIRE CAPTAIN 
DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 

Effective 1/1/90 

FIRE LIEUTENANT 
FIRE CAPTAIN 
DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 



1/25/90 



STEP STEP STEP 

ONE TWO THREE 



33,080. 
40,688. 
50,046 



33,761. 
41,501. 
51,046. 



35,766. 
43,992 
54,110. 



37,912 
46.632. 
57,357 

A True Copy 

ATTEST John M GiMis 

Clerk of Council 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk, ss 

75F1292R2 
To WARREN F. MORTONN 
an absentee, whose last 
known address was 37 
Newton Avenue, Qumcy in 
the County of Norfolk having 
property in the County of 
Norfolk: to the Treasurer and 
Receiver General of said 
Commonwealth: to all 
persons claiming an interest 
in the property hereinafter 
described: and to all whom it 
may concern 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court 
praying that Linda Kowilcik 
of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
successor/receiver of the 
following described property 
of said absentee, 37 Newton 
Avenue, Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts in the County of 
Norfolk. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the twenty- 
eighth day of February 1990, 
the return day of this 
citation 

Witness, Robert M Ford. 
Esquire, First Judge of said 
Court, this twenty-seventh 
day of November 1989. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register 

1/4. 11. 25/90 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 90P0070E1 
Estate of THEDA J. FINCH 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that FRANK G 
FINCH of WHITMAN in the 
County of PLYMOUTH be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on February 21. 
1990 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the 
eleventh day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/25/90 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO 7 
ORDERED: 



January 16. 1990 

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
QUINCY AS FOLLOWS: 

THAT THE REVISED ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF 
QUINCY, 1976, AS AMENDED. BE FURTHER AMENDED AS 
FOLLOWS: IN CHAPTER 16, SEWERS. FAULTS AND 
CESSPOOLS, DELETE THE PRESENT ARTICLE III, 
EFFECTIVE APRIL 1. 1990 AND INSERT AFTER ARTICLE II, 
SEWERS, THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE: 

ARTICLE III 

SEWER USE ORDINANCE 

Section 14 

CALCULATIONS OF SEWER USE RATES 

The City shall amend the Ad Valorem Sewer Use Fee for use of 
the City's sewerage system effective with bills rendered on and 
after April 1, 1990 Such fee shall be collected in the following 
manner from the following three classes of users: 

1 MAJOR INDUSTRIAL USERS 

Users who discharge more than 25.000 gallons per day into 
the sewerage system shall be classified as Major Industrial 
Users These users shall pay their share of wastewater 
management costs in proportion to their actual use of the 
sewerage system. Users in this class shall be charged based 
on the actual metered discharge to the sewer system or 
actual water usage, whichever is deemed applicable by the 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

2 TAX EXEMPT USERS 

Users who are exempt from Real Estate taxes shall be 
classified as tax-exempt users. Users in this classification 
shall pay their share of wastewater management costs in 
proportion to their actual use of the sewerage system. Users 
in this class shall be charged based on their actual metered 
discharge to the sewer system or actual water usage, 
whichever is deemed applicable by the Commissioner of 
Public Works. 

3. SMALL COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USERS 

Users who are not exempt from Real Estate taxes and who 
do not discharge more than 25,000 gallons per day of 
sewage into the sewage system shall be classified as small 
commercial and residential users. Each user shall pay their 
share of wastewater management costs in proportion to 
their actual use of the sewerage system. Users in this class 
shall be charged based on their actual metered discharge to 
the sewer system or actual water usage, whichever is 
deemed applicable by the Commissioner of Public Works 

Sewer Use Fees shall be reviewed at least annually to reflect 
changes in operating costs and revenue requirements 

1 Total annual sewer use charges for each user shall be based 
upon the best available measurement or estimate of each 
user's contribution to wastewater flows in the City of 
Quincy, prorated against estimated total annual wastewater 
flow in the Quincy sewer system. 

2 The Mayor shall annually approve, subject to the 
recommendation of the Commissioner of Public Works a 
base sewer use rate expressed as dollars (and fraction) per 
hundred cubic feet of wastewater discharge Said rates may 
include a rate structure designed to encourage conservation 
by way of an inclining block rate if so authorized by 
Regulations of the Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority. 

3. For thos'? users whose wastewater flows are not metered or 
otherwise reliably measured, the Commissioner shall use 
related measures such as metered water usage, the tiest 
professional judgement, in determining each user's 
contribution 

The Commissioner may require metering or another form 
of measurement of any user's contribution to wastewater 
flow at the expense of the user when in his judgment there is 
no other reasonable means ot estaoiishmg or estimating 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P3081E1 

Estate of KATHERINE E 

CONROY late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that KATHERINE 
E. CURRIE of SANDWICH in 
the County of BARNSTABLE 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will with surety 
on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 in 
the forenoon on January 31. 
1990 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) m 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
nineteenth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty nine 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 

Register of Probate 

1/25/90 



St. Agatha 
Registration 

St. Agatha School, 440 
Adams St., Milton, will hold 
Kindergarten registration for 
the 1990-91 school year Feb. 
5, from 9 a.m. -3 p.m. in the 
school's Music Room. 

Enrollment is open to all, 
not just residents of Quincy. 



INSIDEOUT 

Deleading & 
Painting Co. 

» MA Certificateoooi6i 

• Reasonable Prices 

• Free Estimates 

Call 471-2843 
Leave Message 



PERSONAL 



ST JUDE'S NOVENA 
May the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus be adored, glorified, 
loved and preserved 
throughout the world now 
and forever Sacred Heart 
of Jesus, pray for us St. 
Jude. Helper of the 
Hopeless, pray for us St 
Jude, Worker of Miracles, 
pray for us. 

Say this prayer 9 times a 
day for 9 consecutive days - 
on the 8th day your prayer 
will be answered. This is 
never known to fail. 
Publication must follow. 

BR 1'25 



that contribution and the cost of so metering or measuring is 
not unreasonable 

4. The total annual sewer use charges assessed shall equal as 
nearly as feasible the actual net costs and expenses ot 
maintaining, operating, and improving the sewer system 
including charges and assessments against and improving 
including charges and assessments against the City by the 
MWRA. These costs shall be established in March of each 
year for the forthcoming fiscal year. They shall be based on 

a. An appropriate portion of the operating and capital 
budgets for the forthcoming fiscal year for the 
Department of Public Works 

b Other costs, such as overhead, benefits, and debt 
service, not included in (a) above. 

c Anticipated sewer use charges and assessments against 
the City by the MWRA during the forthcoming fiscal year 

d. An adjustment for revenues received or anticipated 
during the current fiscal year and not reflected in the 
current sewer use charges. 

e An adjustment for costs, expenses, and lost revenues 
incurred or anticipated during the current fiscal year and 
not relfected in the current sewer use charges 

f. Anticipated revenues in the forthcoming fiscal year from 
sources other than sewer use charges 

COLLECTION AND DISPOSITION OF RATES 

The Treasurer/Collector shall receive and collect all sewer 
rates and any other income and place same to the credit of the 
Sewer, Water and Drain Division. All fees collected under this 
ordinance shall be dedicated and used to pay for the operation 
and maintenance costs, bonded debt and interests costs, the 
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority costs incurred by 
the City of Quincy sewerage portion of the Sewer. Water and 
Drain Division of the Department of Public Works. In the event 
that revenue exceeds expenses, such excess shall be held m a 
sewer reserve account The City of Quincy Sewer-Water-Drain 
Dept. as part of its mission will provide the consumer of water 
and sewer services in the City of Quincy with information, 
education and technical asistance pertaining to water 
conservation. Financial assistance shall also be made available 
subject to appropriation. 

SECTION 16 
PAYMENT 

All bills for sewer use shall be due and payable quarterly to the 
Treasurer/Collector and shall use the same billing system as 
used for water bills. 

SECTION 17 
POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE COMMISSIONER 

The Commissioner of Public Works shall have full supervision, 
direction and control of the Sewer Division and shall make such 
rules and regulations for its government as may be deemed 
advisable. The Commissioner of Public Works must develop 
and implement a management plan which will be presented to 
the City Council. The Commissioner is required to notify the 
City Council of any changes in the management plan prior to 
their implementation 

SECTION 18 

OBLIGATIONS TO MASSACHUSETTS 

WATER RESOURCES AUTHORITY 

The City agrees to accept and adhere to the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority Rules and Regulations covering the 
discharge of Sewer Drainage. Substances or Wastes as may be 
adopted 

SECTION 19 
ABATEMENTS 

Any user of water and sewer service who has been granted tax 
exemption under MGL Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41C shall 
also be entitled to a 25% reduction m the total water and sewer 
bill 

Passed To Be Ordained 
ATTEST John M Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/25/90 



Thursday, January 25, 1990 Qtiktey Sun Page 27 




HELP WANTED 



ATTENTION: 

EASY WORK, EXCELLENT 
PAY! 

Assemble products at home 
Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext W- 
23791 

1 25 

ATTENTION: 

EARN MONEY TYPING AT 
HOME! 

$32.000/yr income potential 
Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext T- 
2380 

1 25 

ATTENTION - HIRING! 

Government jobs - your area. 
$17,840- $69,485. Call 1-602- 
838-8885. Ext. R2379 

1/25 



SERVICES 



TYPING/WORD 
PROCESSING SERVICES 

Reports, resumes, thesis, 
flyers, slides (text and 
graphs), etc. Printed on a 
Laser Printer 
Call (508)559-7622 

2/8 



REAL ESTATE 



FOR RENT 
STORE AND OFFICE 

600 sq ft plus basement, 
parking 65 Billings Rd by 
Hancock St , Ouincy Ask next 
store to show $440 Owner no 
fee 734-8172 
r25 

APARTMENT 
FOR RENT 

2 bedrms includes 
heat and off-street 
parking. $850+ utilities. 
Near Quincy Square 

471-3866 

1/25 



ATTENTION 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from Si (U-repair) Delinquent 
tax property Reposessions Call 
1-602-838-8885 Ext GH 2379 

I 25 



INSTRUCTION 



JOY of PIANO 

JOY of ORGAN 

Ln>on< 
323-0698 



2/15 



COLEMAN 
CONSTRUCTION 

Carpentry, Painting, Insulation, 
Gutters etc. No job too big or too 
small 10 years experience 
Free Estimate Call: 773-4541 
2/8 



WANTED 



GOVERNMENT SEIZED 

Vehicles from $100. Fords 
Mercedes Corvettes Chevys. 
Surrjijs Buyers Guide (1) 805- 
68/-6000 Ext. S-3019 

2/1 



DEALERS NEEDED 

to sell our casual line of PVC 
pipe furniture. Write to 
Charles Rebello. 45 Pinette 
St., No. Dartmouth, MA 
02747. 

1/25 

SEARCHING FOR 

RELIABLE CHILD CARE 

In my Wollaston home. 

Mother of three ages 8, 5 and 3 
Ijj'oi . Wed. Fri. 9-4:30, Tues & 
ihurs 5-9 p m References and 
owTi transportation required 
'•or more info, call 773-3547 

2/8 



PERSONALS 



ST. JUDE 
Thank you for your 
strength and refuge 

I^.A V 
1/25 

THANK YOU 
Jesus 

Blessed Mother 
St. Anthony & St. 
Jude 

RO 1/25 



WE CLEAN 

Cellars, attics and garages, 
and we haul anything at 
lowest prices 

Call Bob at 479-7323 

2/8 

VINYL 

REPLACEMENT 

WINDOWS 

• Reasonable Rates 

• Reasonable Labor 

• or buy direct and save 30% 

on your own installation 
Call Steve GoMelln 

335-5894 

for Free Estimate 

2/8 

HOME REPAIR 

MADE AFFORDABLE 

Interior-Exterior Work 

No Job Too Small 

Call Dan Brown 472-9662 

1'25 



SPOTLESS CLEANING 
SERVICE 

Have your home, office, etc 
cleaned to perfection Excellent 
references, reliable and efficient 
Phone 471-7788 

2 1 



FOR RENT 



FUNCTION HALL 

American Legion 
Nickerson Post #332 

Squantum 

on Boston Harbor 

Fully Handicapped Accessable 

32S-9824 after 4 

7/5/90 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite- Capacity 300 
Venetian Room-capacity 140 
Call 472-5900 TF 

~ HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St. 

Quinsy 

472-2223 

TF 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 

HALL FOR RtNT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St. 

479-6149 

TF 

WANTED 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Old woodworking tools, hand 

planes, surplus hand tools: all 

trades Precision machinist 

tools, shoplots 

SS8-3889 also 527-1916 

4/5 

WANTED TO BUY 

Furniture - Estates 
Highest prices for entire 
contents -attic to cellar Also 
separate items-lx>ks, clocks, 
wicker, prints, glass, etc Call 
Alden 472-4917 

2/22 

Old and New 
Furniture Bought 

Also rugs, clocks, paintings, 
glassware and bric-a-brac 
. 749-6475 , ' 

OLD OIL PAINTINGS 
WANTED 

Wanted to buy old oil 
paintings. Marine, landscape. 
Impressionist or Traditional 
Also Watercolors. old books, 
prints, frames and postcards 
556-3839 Also 527-1916 

2/12 



EVEKYBODY'S MARKETPIACE 



SERVICES 



THE LITTLE MAN 

Construction 

ROOFING, CARPENTRY, GUTTERS 

DECKS, PORCHES, PAINTING 

STRUCTURAL WORK, REPAIRS 

No Job Too Big or Small 
Call Chris 471-8218 




2/1 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 
& REWIRING 




Protect Your Investment 

Coletti Painting 



Gutters Cleaned ^k, 

-3720 ^ 



Interior & Exterior 



786-1864 Mark Coletti 773-3720 

North Quincy Free Estimates 3/3 



WALLPAPERING 

• FREE ESTIf^ATES 

• REASONABLE RATES 

• SMALL JOBS WELCOME 
CALL RICHARD VESPAZIANI 

479-6160, After S PM 

1/25 



AVON CALLING! 

Do you know what your best 

colors are'' The right colors can 

make a big difference CallGinny 

328-6371 

2 1 



NEW ENGLAND 
EXTERIOR 

Resideniial Commercial 

Renovations 

Vinyl Siding Roofing. Glitters 

R"Placemeni Windows. Insulation 

Licensed and Insured 

1-800-782-0816 

? 1 

SHEETROCKING ~ 

Attn Do It Yourselters ■ 
Semi-retired taper can assist you 
from planning to f'oishing 
Please leave message 328-9685 



EDDIE'S WELDING & 
METAL FABRICATION 

Offers portable service in all 
types of repairs and light iron 
fabrication Free Estimates 
(617)471-2059 



3/1 



J.N. ELECTRICAL CO. 

Fully Licensed and Insured 

No Job Too Small 

Lie #E28696 Free Estimates 

11 Hallam St , Boston. MA 02125 

Jack Nee (617)288-6467 

2/1 

FRANCIS X. 
McCAULEY 

INDIVIDUAL INCOME 

TAX PREPARATION 

Benily College graduate, over 20 

years experience Call 773-9927 or 

<79-6230. 

4/12 

PAINTING 

Interior • Exterior 

Wallpapering • Wood Staining 

Licensed • Insured 

We use 1st Quality Products 

You gel Top Quality Results 

For Estimates Call 

963-1613 1/25 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 

LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 



TAX RETURNS 

Richard McDonough 
Professional Service in your 
fiome. Enrolled to practice 
before the IRS. Registered 
Investment Advisor 472- 
2694, 545-7919 

4/5 



LOSE WEIGHT! 

Safely and effectively as Oprah 

at one fifth the cost with "Food 

For Life Weight Management 

System" 

Call 472-9662 or 

696-1089 

2/17 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc ) 

• Greek XL Vacuums 

• Electroluxw/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



CARPENTRY 

Roofing, Painting, Porch Work, 

Vinyl Siding, Windows, Doors, 

Gutters, Etc. 

No Job Too Small 

Free Estimates 

T. SwMitay 825-1210 

3/29 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin St . So Quincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 




SULLIVAN 

LANDSCAPE 

AND 

TREE SERVICE 

Free Estlmatea 

472-3595 



3/1 



^E DO IT 44^ 
WELDING CO. 



f 



7*x 



QUINCY "^ 479-0991' 

3, 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 




Cban/)e/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 

MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



OUINCY SUN 

OUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D 4.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 3 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable TV. for only $1 per day. 



INDEX 



OUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

OUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4.20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of the same aa 
10<P each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run for 4 days on Channel 26-Sun 
Cable TV. for only $1 per day 



a Services 

D For Sale 

a Autos 

a Boats 

D For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 
a Pets, Livestoctt 
D Lost and Found 
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a Antiques 

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a Personal 

n Electrical & Appliances 



Cable Ads will be 
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OUINCY SUN & 
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D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions fo same ad, 
IOC each additional word. Channel 26-Sun Cable for 5 days at 
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QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
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D $3.85 per insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 
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D With your Sun ad, you can also run for 7 days on Channel 26-Sun 
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D Run your ad on Channel 26-Sun Cable TV alone for 3 days at 
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( 



Page 21 Quincy Sun Thunday. January 25, 1990 



Sheets Names Fishman 
New Personnel Director 



(Cont'd from Pafie h 

done by David Smith. In fact, 
I think David Smith has been 
a valuable asset for the city," 
Sheets said. 

Besides being Personnel 
Director, Smith was 
chairman of the city's 
Environmental Task Force. 
Among the issues it is 
addressing is the proposed 
siting of a hazardous waste 
incinerator near Quincy 
Point. 

Administrative Secretary 
Bernice Mader is now 



chairman of the Task Force. 

"But," the mayor continued, 
"(Personnel Director) is a 
sensitive position and we'll be 
dealing with grievances and 
(contract) negotiations and I 
felt I should deal with my own 
appointment." 

Sheets said he chose 
Fishman based on her 
experience and "comments 
made by professional people 
who work with her." 

"After some inquiry, we 
were convinced without 
question that she was the one 
for the job," the mayor said. 




AGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

Let us give you a 
competitive quote on your 
AUTO, homeowner, business, 
Anthony L. Agnitti ''^e and health 

• Free Registry Service 
• Free Nptary Service • Time Payments 
• Fully Computerized 
• Quotes By Phone 



21 Franklin St. 
Quincy, 02169 



770-0123 



As Benefits Coordinator, 
Fishman has dealt with 
"extremely complicated" 
insurance issues such as Blue 
Cross-Blue Shield, Sheets 
noted. "She has done an 
excellent job and has 
demonstrated professional 
skills." 

A 1981 graduate of 
Syracuse University with a 
bachelor of science degree in 
management, Fishman has 
been Benefits Coordinator for 
approximately five years. In 
that capacity, she recom- 
mended and implemented 
cost-containment strategies 
resulting in excess of $1 
million savings. 

In addition, she re- 
organized an annual open 
enrollment formation 
program to provide better 
communication of alternate 
health plans and calculated an 
$8 million insurance budget 
annually. 

Fishman also performed 
preliminary investigation of 
new alternate benefit plans, 
counselled retired employees 
regarding Medicare and 
Medicare-extension pro- 
grams while handling a wide 
variety of employee benefit 
problems. 

Sheets has not appointed a 
new Benefits Coordinator. 



Good idea! 



All of your Christmas pictures this and past years 

on one video tape 

Add Title and Music Free! 



All work done on premises 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
472-7131 




WEEKLY WORKSHOPS IN FLORAL ARRAN(;IM; 

Won. Tiien. \^etl & Thurt*. Evenings - Mon. Tins. Wed. Days 

Call for informalion and limes a\ailahle. 

DO YOl DO CRArrsy 

Come in and see almul our eonsijjnmeni rorner 

- Valentine (iifls - Weddings - Fimelions - Class Reunions - 

(Come in and do your own eenlerpieres) 

Children's Workshop - Sal.. Feb. .3 & Sal.. Feb. M) 

10:30 a.m. - 12 Noon Ages 8-12 

Roseann's 

1091 Hanroek St.. Quinr>. MA 02lf»9. (617) TT.'i-lii.vi 



DeCristofaro Urges 15 
Local Town Clerks To Join 
Fight Against Incinerator 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

City Council President 
Theodore DeCristofaro has 
written 15 local town clerks 
asking them to join the 
Council in its opposition 
against the siting of a 
hazardous waste incinerator 
in East Braintree. 

Clean Harbors, Inc. has 
proposed a rotary kiln 
hazardous waste incinerator 
in the Fore River industrial 
basin near the East Braintree- 
Quincy line. Already, elected 
officials and civic groups from 
Quincy, Braintree, Weymouth 
and Hingham are trying to 
stop the siting. 

DeCristofaro, who repre- 
sents Ward 2 which includes 
the area nearest the proposed 
site, wrote letters to town 
clerks in these towns: Milton, 
Avon, Boston, Scituate, 
Cohasset, Hingham, Randolph, 
Hull, Marshfield, Duxbury. 
Hanover, Norwell, Rockland, 
Abington and Whitman. 

in his letter, the council 
president said, "We are all at 
risk" since "emissions know 
no boundaries." 




TED DeCRlSTOFARO 

DeCristofaro continued, 
"Air studies indicate that the 
toxic emissions from this 
facility will travel a minimum 
of 10 miles and, depending on 
local winds, up to 40 miles. 
Not only could the air be 
contaminated, but also our 
surface water supplies and of 
course, the ground itself." 

He also noted that 
transportation is another 
concern which surrounding 
communities should address. 



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"These hazardous waste 
and toxic chemicals will be 
coming to Braintree from the 
New England states and 
Canada. These trucks will 
travel over our roads and 
bridges; and in some areas, 
due to construction projects 
or simply the local network, 
the vehicles will pass through 
our neighborhoods threat- 
ening the local population," 
DeCristofaro said. 

He also noted that no 
"substantial" evacuation 
plans for areas outside 
Quincy, Braintree and 
Weymouth exist. 

"Can you imagine what 
would happen if there was a 
serious fire or spill? At the 
same time our fire department 
mutual assistance agreements 
would come into play." 

In closing, DeCristofaro 
asked the town clerks to 
oppose "this threat to 
ourselves and our quality of 
life." 

He also requested they 
forward letters to Gov. 
Michael Dukakis, Secretary 
of Environmental Affairs 
John DeVillars and Depart- 
ment of Environmental 
Protection Commissioner 
Daniel Greenbaum "stating 
our opposition." 

Squantum 
Neighborhood 

Watch Topic 

Officer Robert Hanna of 
the Quincy Police Dept. will 
be guest speaker at the 
Wednesday, Feb. 7, general 
the Squantum 
Association on 
at 7:30 p.m. He 
"Neighborhood 



meeting of 
Community 
Standish Rd. 
will discuss 
Watch." 



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Quincy, MA 



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Hanna Olson Has 

Simple Formula 

For Reaching 100 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

For Hanna Olson, 
Quincy's newest centenar- 
ian, the secret of a long, 
healthy and happy life is 
simple: religion, proper 
diet and no smoking or 
drinking. 

Olson, a native of 
Sweden and longtime 
Quincy resident, cele- 
brated her lOOth birthday 
Saturday with relatives 
and friends at her home 
located at 26 Carlson St. 

"She's very religious, 
doesn't smoke or drink, 
and she reads the Bible 



everyday," said Doris 
Herbert, 60, her only 
granddaughter. 

Hanna also eats fish 
regularly, doesn't wear any 
jewelry and make-up and 
has never cut her blonde 
hair. Instead, she braids 
her locks and puts the 
braids neatly in a bun. 
Relatives say her hair is 
several feet long. 

Born in a small town 
outside Stockholm, 
Sweden on Jan. 27, 1890, 
Hanna came to the United 
States with her late 
husband, Martin, in 1914. 



He worked at the Morgan 
Brothers Ice Cream shop 
in Boston where they lived 
for five years. 

In 1919, they moved to 
Quincy after Martin joined 
the Bethlehem Steel 
Company at the Fore 
River shipyard. He 
worked there as a shipfitter 
for 36 years, retiring at the 
age of 65 in 1950. 

Hanna has lived in 
Quincy 71 years. Today, 
she still does many 
household routines, such 
as cooking, by herself. 

(Con I'll on Paiic 4) 




HAPPY 100th BIRTHD A Y - Hanna Olson of Quincy receives a birthday cake on her lOOth 
birthday last Saturday from Kelly Herbert, 14, a great-granddaughter, and Doris Herbert, 
her grandaughter. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Hosuorih) 





VOL. 22 No. 19 



Thursday, February 1. 1990 




25$ 



Layoffs Coming 



All City Depts. Face 3- To- 5 Percent Cuts 




By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

With the City Council poised to approve a proposed sewer user fee. Mayor 
James Sheets said Tuesday all city departments face between three to five 
percent cuts in the fiscal 1991 budget which begins July I. 



QUINCY COUNCIL ON AGING Chairman John Noonan, left, presents outgoing Executive 
Director Tom Koch with a compass as a small token of appreciation for his work with the 
council. Koch is now executive secretary to Mayor James Sheets. Looking on are Council 
Secretary Mary Kaye Banford, second from right, and Rev. Alicia Corea, vice chairman. 

Counsel Asks Liquor 

Complaints In Double 

Fatality Be Sent To Court 



However, the mayor said 
the level of cuts "could change 
at any time," especially since 
the amount of local aid due to 
Quincy for the second half of 
fiscal 1990 is unknown. 
Furthermore, the mayor 
acknowledged there will be 
layoffs with or without the 
fee. 

If approved, the fee would 
raise $9.5 million to help 
offset a $14.6 million deficit in 
fiscal 1991. The remaining $6 
million in red ink would be 
wiped out by three to five 
percent cuts in all depart- 
ments. 

Without the fee, the mayor 
noted there would be 13.7 
percent cuts in all depart- 
ments across the board to 
balance the budget. 

Since only Ward 6 



Councillor Thomas Nutley 
has objected to the fee, the 
City Council will probably 
endorse it at its Feb. 20th 
meeting. 

Once the proposal is 
passed, Sheets and his 
department heads will begin 
making reductions, including 
layoffs. 

"If there are five percent 
cuts, we're looking at expense 
cuts plus layoffs. If we're 
talking three percent cuts, 
some departments would 
have just expense cuts and 
some departments would 
have both expense cuts and 
layoffs," the mayor said. 

Presently, Sheets has 
projected a $2.6 million deficit 
for fiscal 1990 which ends 
June 30. That deficit would be 
"rolled over" into the fiscal 



199 J budget which is expected 
to be short by $14.6 million. 
That figure includes the 
rollover. 

Much of the city's financial 
future hinges on the fate of the 
sewer user fee and the next 
local aid payment which is 
due in June. A majority of 
councillors have expressed 
support for the fee at three 
recent Ordinance Committee 
meetings with only Nutley 
objecting. 

The councillor has 
maintained that the fee, which 
would cost an average family 
of four $280 a year on top of 
its water bill, is too costly for 
homeowners. Instead, Nutley 
has made several cost-saving 
and revenue generating ideas 

(Cont'd on I'afit' J,'>l 



Nutley Has 3 1 Ideas 
As User Fee Alternatives 



By JANE ARENA 

The Quincy Police Depart- 
ment will take its case against 
the Quincy Bay Inn to Court, 
according to Police Chief 
Francis Finn, as requested by 
Counsel for the inn. 

The case concerns 
alleptions that the Aquarius 
Lounge at Quincy Bay Inn 
served alcohol to two 
intoxicated Quincy youths on 
the night they died in a car 
crash on Route 3A in 
Hingham last September. 

The matter was due to come 
before the License Board 
Tuesday, but was continued 
indefinitely by the board on 



the request of Atty. Richard 
Barry, representing the 
Quincy Bay Inn. 

In a letter to the board 
dated Jan. 29, Barry 
requested that the Police 
Department prosecute the 
case through criminal court so 
that Barry would be entitled 
to evidence which he might be 
denied if the case was brought 
before the License Board. 

Finn said the Police 
Department would request a 
special Assistant District 
Attorney to prosecute the 
case. If found guilty, 
employees of the establish- 
ment could face $50 to $500 in 



fines and from one month to 
one year in jail. 

The allegations concern the 
serving of alcohol to Shawn 
Clancy and Daniel Ward, 
both 19, of Quincy on the 
night of Sept. 25, 1989. The 
teenagers later died in a car 
crash in Hingham when they 
hit a tree and a utility pole. 
Police estimated that the car 
was traveling at over 100 miles 
per hour at the time of the 
crash. 

In his letter, Atty. Barry 
said a central factor in the case 
would be the reports on the 

(Cont'd on I'a/ie 2'it 



Ward 6 Councillor Thomas 
Nutley, who is opposed to a 
sewer user fee as a means to 
closing next year's budget 
gap, has made 31 suggestions 
to James A. Sheets as 
alternatives to the fee. 

His ideas, which Sheets 
received Tuesday, include: 

• Requiring city employees 
to pay 10 percent of their 
HMO payments. 

• Zero pay increases for 
all city employees. With union 
compliance, no layoffs this 
year. 

• Consolidate Quincy 
High and North Quincy High 
School at North. It is the 
newer of the two facilities and 
North is closer to the MBTA 
Red Line, Nutley reasoned. 
North still has bonded debt, 
he added. 




THOMAS NUTLEY 
Ward 6 

• Reorganize Quincy 
Vocational-Technical High 
School with Blue Hills 
Regional School in Canton. 

• Fifty dollar fee on third 



and successive cars in each 
family. 

• One hundred percent 
hiring freeze. 

• Liberalize downtown 
zoning to encourage 
development on both sides of 
Coddington St. from Quincy 
Junior College to Quincy 
Police Station. He suggests 
making the area Planned Unit 
Development (PUD) and 
allowing buildings up to eight 
stories. 

• Increased mitigation 
monies from the MWRA up 
front for hosting interim 
sludge facility at the Fore 
River shipyard. The city will 
receive an estimated $2.2 each 
year from 1991 through 1995 
from the MWRA for hosting 

(Cont'd on Pa/fv 51 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday. February I, 1990 



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THE LEGAL ADVICE AND 
REFERRAL CLINIC (LARC) 

DO YOU HAVE A LEGAL QUESTION - 

OR - ARE YOU CONFUSED 

ABOUT A LEGAL ISSUE? 



The Bar Association of Norfolk County 
is sponsoring legal clinics to assist you 
with questions. There will be a panel of 
attorneys volunteering their time to 
assist you. 

WHERE? 

QUINCY DISTRICT COURT 

One Dennis Ryan Parkway, Quincy, MA 02169 

WHEN? 

FEBRUARY 7, 1990 

(WEDNESDAY EVENING) 

TIME? 
6:00 P.M. TO 8:00 P.M. 

The above is a public service to the 
community and all are invited to 
attend. This wi II be held on a first come, 
first served basis, and is free of charge 
to the public. You will have a one on 
one consultation with an attorney who 
specializes in the area of the law you 
may have a question in. 

ADRIENNE CLARKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
BAR ASSOCIATION OF NORFOLK COUNTY 






S. Quincy Restaurant 

,Warned After Noise, 

Parking Complaints 



By JANE ARENA 

After hearing noise and 
parking complaints from 
several neighbors against the 
Varsity Club, 33 Independence 
Ave., the License Board 
Tuesday placed the matter on 
file. 

However, Police Chief 
Francis Finn recommended 
that if the matter comes 
before the board again, the 
establishment should be made 
to show cause why its license 
should not be suspended. This 
is the second time neighbors 
have complained to the board 
about the club. The matter 
was before the board last 
Spring. 

The complaints, by 
Barbara Elsayed of 38 
Independence Ave., and 
supported by several other 
area residents, allege that 
patrons from the establish- 
ment make noise after 2 a.m. 
by slamming car doors, 
shouting obscenities, driving 
away and sounding horns, 
and playing car radios. 
Elsayed also told the board 
that patrons park on 
Independence Ave. and area 
streets, blocking entrance to 
driveways. She said they also 
park illegally in the parking 
lot at CVS. 

Elsayed told the board she 
has asked the employees, 
including the doorman, to 
have patrons move their cars 
from near her driveway 
several times. She said she was 
"abused and insulted" by 
Varsity Club employees and 



said they were uncooperative 
in carrying out her requests. 

Other neighbors told the 
board that they are disturbed 
at night by the noise of 
employees rolling beer kegs to 
and from an outdoor cooler 
located in back of the 
property. 

David Palmer of 70 Federal 
Ave. said that the cooler, 
which is fenced in and 
measures about 10-feet-by- 
lO-feet, is used by employees 
during the night. He also 
questioned whether or not the 
cooler is legally permitted on 
the property. Building 
Commissioner Matthias 
Mulvey said he will check to 
see if the cooler is permitted in 
the area. 

Atty. Carl Johnson, 
representing Varsity Club 
owner Jon Perette, told the 
board the establishment 
operates on a "system" which 
ensures the cooler is not used 
at night. 

Perette told the board no 
employees go into or out of 
the cooler after 6 p.m. 

Neighbors also told the 
board they are disturbed by 
rubbish collectors at the 
Varsity Club between 5 a.m. 
and 6 a.m. Perette said the 
rubbish disposal company. 
Waste Management, Inc., 
picks up the rubbish after 9 
a.m. 

Board Chairman John 
Giilis said trash collectors 
throughout the City have 
been causing a problem by 



picking up too early in the 
morning. 

Atty. Johnson said the 
Varsity Club closes at 
midnight, earlier than the 
legal closing time of 1 a.m. He 
said the noise after 2 a.m. may 
be caused by patrons who 
leave the Varsity Club at 
midnight, go somewhere else, 
and then return to their cars 
after 2 a.m. 

"1 don't see how the owners 
(of the Varsity Club) can be 
held accountable for 
something that happens at 2 
a.m.," he said. 

Johnson also noted that the 
Varsity Club has installed an 
indoor public address system 
so that they can ask patrons to 
move cars if they are parked 
illegally. 

Johnson said the Varsity 
Club is "sensitive" to the 
concerns of the neighbors and 
told the board that 
management is willing to take 
any measures to correct the 
problems. 

The board suggested that 
Varsity Club erect a fence to 
the entrance of their parking 
lot to be locked after 12:30 
a.m. A sign will be placed 
inside the establishment, 
advising patrons that any cars 
left after that time will be 
locked in for the night. 
On the suggestion of Ward 4 
councillor Thomas Fabrizio, 
present at the hearing, the 
club will also hire an extra 
police detail for outside the 

(Cont'd on Pa/ic 26) 




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Thursday, February I, 1990 Quincy Sun Page J 



Council Approves 

User Fee 
Management Plan 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The City Council Ordi- 
nance Committee has 
approved a sewer user fee 
management plan but 
postponed voting on the 
actual fee until its Feb. 20 
meeting. 

On Monday night, the 
committee delayed the vote 
out of courtesy to Ward 6 
Councillor Thomas Nutley. 
Nutley, who does not support 
the fee, said he wanted to meet 
with Mayor James Sheets, 
who proposed the fee, and 
discuss other cost-saving and 
money-raising measures. 

It appears the fee will be 
approved at the Council's 
Feb. 20 meeting because a 
majority of councillors have 
said they support it. 

The fee would raise about 
$9.5 million in fiscal 1991 
which begins July I. If 
approved Feb. 20, the fee 
would apply to homeowners 
as well as industrial and small 
business users for the last 
quarter of FY 1990: April, 
May and June. 

The fee would cost an 
average family of four $280 in 
addition to its water bill. The 
fee is based on 70 percent 
water usage. 

Public Works Commis- 
sioner David Colton 
estimated the charge will be 
$3.07 per 100 cubic feet, which 
equals about 750 gallons. 

Once the ~ sewer rate is 

Food To Be 

Distributed 

In March 

Quincy residents eligible 
for assistance programs in 
March will receive butter, 
peanut butter, vegetarian 
beans and green beans. 

The food will be distributed 
by Quincy Community 
Action Programs, Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday, 
March 5, 6 and 7, from I to 4 
p.m. at the Sons of Italy on 
Quarry St., and the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center, 1 1 
Hunt St. 

Eligible residents must 
receive Aid to Families with 
Dependent Children (AFDC), 
General Relief, Supplemental 
Security Income (SSI), food 
stamps, fuel assistance, WIC 
or Veterans benefits. 

All others must meet 
income eligibility guidelines. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
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Telephone: 471-3100 



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finally set, Colton said it will 
likely be less than anticipated 
because of savings being 
passed on to Quincy by the 
MWRA. Last week, the 
authority saved millions of 
dollars when a bond issue for 
the Boston Harbor Cleanup 
cost less than expected. 

Colton said the fee could be 
lower because the MWRA's 
assessment to Quincy will be 
$7.9 million instead of a 
projected $8.9 million next 
year. 

The plan approved 
Monday night calls for: 

• Fees to be set by the 
public works commissioner 
and the mayor. 

• Surplus sewer money 
will go toward reducing the 
next year's rates or improving 
the sewer system. 

• Meters be read at least 
twice a year to insure they are 
working properly and fees are 
correct. 

• Spending $5,000 or 
more a year on educating 
residents on water conserva- 
tion to reduce bills. Measures 
include installing water saving 
toilets, shorter showers and 
turning off the faucet while 
brushing teeth. 

Ward 3 Councillor 



Lawrence Chretien, who 
noted with the fee the city still 
faces a $6 to $7 million 
shortfall next year, said the 
council's work on next year's 
budget "is just beginning." 

Chretien said he will 
address the School Commit- 
tee and ask that board to 
adopt a water conservation 
program as part of the 
curriculum. 

He also said the city should 
set a goal of "drastic 
reduction" in water con- 
sumption. "Water conserva- 
tion, like recycling, kills two 
birds with one stone," he said. 

A water conservation 
program could eventually 
lead to lower assessments and 
thus lower bills, he noted. 

The plan also entitles 
homeowners age 70 and 
above to receive a 25 percent 
abatement if their income is 
$13,000 (single) or $15,000 
(couple). The abatements 
would be reviewed by the city 
treasurer and auditor. 

The committee was 
prepared to vote on the fee but 
Council President Ted 
DeCristofaro, as a courtesy to 
Nutley, asked for the motion 
to approve the fee be 
removed. 




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MERRYMOl NT SCHOOL Hfth grade teacher Jeanne Billikas assists students Joe 
Cushera, left, and Ryan Catarius, during a recent Chinese New Year feast. The fifth grade 
classes have been studying China and this celebration culminated the project. 

iQuinry Sun i>holn h\ lorn (iorman) 

Robert Griffin Named 
To Quincy Hospital Board 



Quincy Mayor James 
Sheets has appointed Robert 
J. Griffin to a five-year term 
on the Quincy Hospital Board 
of Managers. Griffin, a 
former chairman of the state 
Rate Setting Commission, is a 



Quincy resident. 

An associate attorney with 
Krokidas and Biuestein, a 
Boston firm. Griffin chaired 
the Rate Setting Commission 
from 1982 to 1985. The 
commission oversees reim- 



Waste Incinerator Opponents 
Launch Petition Drive 



bursement rates to health care 
institutions in Massachusetts. 
Griffin and another, yet-to- 
be named board member will 
replace William J. O'Brien 
and the Rev. Dr. Peter Corea. 
whose terms have expired. 



The Coalition for a Safe 
Environment, which includes 
all communities in opposition 
to the Clean Harbors, Inc. 



hazardous waste incinerator 
proposed for East Braintree, 
is currently sponsoring a 
petition drive. 



The Quincy effort is being 
coordinated by Linda 
Browne. Anyone wishing to 
collect signatures may contact 
her at 328-9183. 



A Community Loan Fund? 




The Hibernia Savings Bank offers 

preferred rates and terms for 
Quincy, Braintree and Weymouth. 

1YEAR 

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RATE 



APR 



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Loans up to $225,000 
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3 YEAR 

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Loans up to $225,000 
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We have established a $20,000,000 loan fund with 
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For more information about the Community Loan Fund, 
come In today or call Roger Meade at (617) 479-2265. 

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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thurulay. February t, 1990 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy. Mass. 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth Jr., Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth, Editor 
Jane C Arena, Assistant Editor 

25C per copy, $11 00 per year by nnail in Quincy 
$12.00 per year by mail outside Quincy, $15.00 out of state 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass. 

Postmaster: Send address change to: 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy, Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility tor 
typograptiical errors in advertisements Ixjt will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs 






-A 



Hanna Olson Has 

Simple Formula 

For Reaching 100 



(Cont'd from Pane I) 

Candi Davis, a great- 
grandchild who lives with 
her great-grandmother, 
says Hanna still washes all 
her clothes by hand. 

Besides her one grand- 
daughter and eight great- 
grandchildren, Hanna has 
nine great-great-grand- 
children. And it appears 
longevity runs in the 
family: Hanna's daughter, 
Marie Johnson, age 80, 
lives with her mother in the 
charming red house on 
Carlson St. 
. Hanna, a member of the 



Seventh Day .\dventist 
Church in Boston, is very 
religious